Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

The importance of bicycle weight for the fifty plus

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

The importance of bicycle weight for the fifty plus

Old 02-10-23, 11:12 PM
  #1  
hsea17
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 98

Bikes: Giant SCR / Felt FR5 / Trek Emonda ALR 6 / Trek Domane AL2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 10 Posts
The importance of bicycle weight for the fifty plus

Would there be any benefits for a man well over 60 who exercises regularly but varies the week between slow jogging/swimming and cycling 3-5 hours with a lighter bike except when I carry it up the stairs? My current bike weighs about 9 kg + ! I can still cycle at a speed of 17 - 19 mph but then it's mostly flat road? I have a low/normal body weight versus height so not much to gain by losing weight and could actually like to gain a few kilos, but in muscle but that is not easy at this age.
Any input welome
hsea17
hsea17 is offline  
Old 02-11-23, 12:20 AM
  #2  
HelpSingularity 
Full Member
 
HelpSingularity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: San Diego, California USA
Posts: 282

Bikes: 1974 Masi GC, 1982 Trek 728 (aka 720), 1992 Trek Multitrack 750

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked 164 Times in 108 Posts
Eddy Merckx supposedly said instead of upgrading bikes, ride up grades. I think that advice is still valid.

But if you're angling for a new ride, well, I'm in no position to judge. Life is short.
HelpSingularity is offline  
Likes For HelpSingularity:
Old 02-11-23, 12:24 AM
  #3  
79pmooney
Senior Member
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,221

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4354 Post(s)
Liked 3,417 Times in 2,214 Posts
Originally Posted by hsea17
Would there be any benefits for a man well over 60 who exercises regularly but varies the week between slow jogging/swimming and cycling 3-5 hours with a lighter bike except when I carry it up the stairs? ...
Any input welome
hsea17
Yes. Lighter bikes are easier for us old guys to hoist onto the pegs for storage.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 02-11-23, 02:12 AM
  #4  
hsea17
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 98

Bikes: Giant SCR / Felt FR5 / Trek Emonda ALR 6 / Trek Domane AL2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney
Yes. Lighter bikes are easier for us old guys to hoist onto the pegs for storage.
Yes, but seriously sometimes when I go down the stairs before 6 am with a bike in one hand and shoes in the other (fortunately only from the second floor), 9Kg + is heavy enough and I don't even want to mention the walk back up. Well I don't know if that excuse holds up to get the better half to open the safe and more likely she will recommend saving for a wheelchair

hsea17
hsea17 is offline  
Old 02-11-23, 08:19 AM
  #5  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 23,615
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7192 Post(s)
Liked 7,446 Times in 3,763 Posts
Regardless of one's age, a lighter bike will accelerate a bit faster and climb a bit faster. Whether those things are a benefit to you only you can decide. If you're just riding alone probably not.

A nice, new bike will make some people excited to get out and ride more, however.

Your bike isn't especially heavy, btw. One of my road bikes is a few pounds heavier than that and my main ride is just a pound or so lighter. You can, of course, buy a bike of the shelf that is under 16 pounds, depending on $$$ and how far you want to go.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 02-11-23, 08:20 AM
  #6  
skidder
Coffee Groundskeeper
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,762

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1421 Post(s)
Liked 1,169 Times in 801 Posts
Besides the portage up-and-down a flight of stairs, what do you want to accomplish by buying a new (or newer) bicycle? From your opening post it sounds like you're using the current bicycle to keep in shape, but any goals beyond that? As HelpSingularity mentions above, finding some hills and pedaling up & down those will help with better conditioning. I'm quite happy with my current collection of bicycles, which are all less than 'top-of-the-line', and would be considered somewhat heavy and slow, but they do what I want them to do and are reliable.
skidder is offline  
Likes For skidder:
Old 02-11-23, 08:25 AM
  #7  
easyupbug 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,529

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 520 Post(s)
Liked 484 Times in 352 Posts
I come from a cycling family and at 72 need to keep up with the kids and grandkids when we visit. We are snow birds and have places in road bike friendly locations, only complicated by my arthritis that on some bad days has me in a recumbent trike. Published studies have shown that when it comes to building muscle moderate weights can be as effective as heavy weights. In the last 2 to 3 years I have stopped riding my beloved vintage/classic road bikes (+20 lbs) and now riding only titaniums (-20 lbs) as my back/hand/wrist arthritis seems to prefer them to steel or carbon, can not explain it but the compliance/vibration is different. These being lighter have decreased times on my training routes. I don't do stairs but did some cyclocross and if I had to I would us the carrying methods we did or the multitude to straps, etc. made to carry folding bike for office workers, one daughter has a nice strap between the ST and DT on a bike she commutes with and carries into her office.
easyupbug is offline  
Old 02-11-23, 11:21 AM
  #8  
terrymorse 
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 5,963

Bikes: Scott Addict R1

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2409 Post(s)
Liked 2,420 Times in 1,224 Posts
When I was in my early 40s, I had a heavy touring bike (about 11 kg). I rode that thing for tens of thousands of miles, and millions (yes, millions plural) of vertical feet.

My ride buddies told me I should get a lighter bike, but I resisted for several years. When I finally broke down and got a fairly light bike, it was like night and day. Climbs were easier, and it was winning all the sprints against my ride buddies.

I'm in my 60s now, and I have become a full on weight weenie. My bike weighs about 6 kg, and I love riding it.

My advice is to start small. Get a nice, light, slightly aero carbon wheel set with low rolling resistance tires, and use them on your current bike. You will feel the difference. If you decide to get another bike, you can use those wheels on it.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat

terrymorse is offline  
Likes For terrymorse:
Old 02-11-23, 04:07 PM
  #9  
pbass
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,176

Bikes: 2016 Surly Cross Check, 2019 Kona Rove ST

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 307 Times in 206 Posts
I've never put a bike's weight at the top of my list. I'm 62 and ride two different steel gravel bikes. One is a singlespeed. They are not light, but I Iove a good steel frame first and foremost. I ride them everywhere, including where I used to mountain bike, and I call the singlespeed my "gym on wheels" - between pulling myself up rocky pitches to the occasional hike a bike when it just gets too steep, I'm getting an all-body workout with that beast. Not everyone's cup of tea I realize, but man, my upper body is way stronger and more muscular the more I ride the ss (especially offroad).
pbass is offline  
Likes For pbass:
Old 02-11-23, 09:35 PM
  #10  
50PlusCycling
Senior Member
 
50PlusCycling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 899
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 420 Post(s)
Liked 549 Times in 301 Posts
Lighter bikes usually have more advantages over heavier bikes than just less weight. They tend to be built with better materials and with better components. They are also quicker-handling and more responsive. And, in my opinion, they are better looking.
50PlusCycling is offline  
Old 02-11-23, 10:13 PM
  #11  
rsbob 
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 5,009

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2015 Post(s)
Liked 4,077 Times in 2,210 Posts
Just buy it.
__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️








rsbob is offline  
Old 02-12-23, 05:21 AM
  #12  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 6,322
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3218 Post(s)
Liked 3,525 Times in 2,223 Posts
Bike weight is unimportant when riding at steady speed on flat roads.

It only becomes a bit more important when you are climbing and only then if you want to be fast. If you went from a 9 kg bike to a 7 kg bike then you would climb a little faster and the bike would ďfeelĒ more nimble, but thatís all.

Having said the above, I hate the feel of heavy bikes on the road. But 9 kg is not really that heavy.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 02-12-23, 06:32 AM
  #13  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 15,022

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2017 Workswell 093, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 143 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7383 Post(s)
Liked 3,015 Times in 1,611 Posts
I think @skidder sums it up in his tag-line: "Are we having fun yet?"

I like lighter bikes. I am exceedingly overweight. I am the guy everyone references when they joke about spending more to shave grams than to shave calories. I have a pair of sub-7-pounders---all -up, ready to ride, with lights and tools and tubes , cages etc (not "showroom-ready" but road-ready.) My third most favorite ride is my work-rain bike which is ten pounds heavier. It has some nice CF wheels, light and strong and with those wheels (I tried two other sets) is a real joy to ride. I also have on old steel Raleigh, which is about the same weight as the work bike---heavy, in modern terms---but which is also a joy to ride.

Because I am not paid by the hour to ride, how long I ride, how fast, my times compared to other rides, all that---and I track all those metrics on a spreadsheet---Really Don't Matter. By the time I am doing the math (or the Excel sheet is doing it for me) I have already finished the ride. I had the fun, made the effort, saw the sights, lived the life .... I might have set a dozen personal bests and never knownn it or I might have had the slowest speeds of the year. Whether or not I enjoyed The Ride is not related. I might have loved every minute of the slowest ride of the year.

Are my lighter bikes more responsive? Sure ... but after a few hundred yards, it feels like it feels on that bike on that day. I have never thought in the middle of a ride, "This other bike would have been better." Also, I find that according to metrics, How I feel on a given day matters more to my metrics than what I ride. I have done back-to-back rides on new carbon and old steel and had the same times, pretty much ... with a 9-pound weight swing.

So ... if you Want to buy or build a really light bike, for some reason, whatever, go ahead.

It will possibly make you a few seconds faster or a tenth of a mph faster on some rides, if that is a thing for you. It might feel a little quicker in the first few hundred yard, when you hit the gas and it squirts forward .... but if you ride the same bike every day, you will lose that sense of comparison anyway. And yes, a lighter bike, if it fits and meets your needs, can be a pure joy to own and ride. But so can a heavier bike.

What do you want? if you want a higher average speed at the end of the ride .... sure, buy a lighter bike. But anyone will tell you, it is 95% the engine. If speed Really matters, train harder .... Also as we age we slow .... sorry but we know that. At some point there won't be a bike light enough to make up for time .... so that light bike you buy today won't be giving you those same gains after a few years, likely (but maybe ... we are all different.) If you just want to see what it is like, rent or borrow one.

If you don't want to "train" but just want to ride (like me) then sure, nothing wrong with a lighter bike .... but no guarantee you will like it as much as your current ride.

Ultimately ... we cannot take it with us, so we need to do it now .... so Yes. Buy a light bike. Don't mess around, either. get one of those 14.9-lb. S-Works Aethos machines .... Don't go from 9 kg to eight, got to six. Really feel it. After all, the trade off is just that you will have to be buried in a cardboard casket instead of oak or maple. I would do that trade Every day.

If I could justify it to my wife, and if my health let me ride more, I would buy an Aethos just for kicks ... I have no real use, but I love light bikes. I would still be slower than the neighbor's three-year-old on his Big Wheel but i would love the bike even though I was wasting it.

What I would Not do would be to imagine that it would make me faster, or better in any way, or make riding more fun. My state of mind determines if I enjoy a ride, and my fitness determines pace. I cannot buy mental or physical health (or I would .) But I would love to own the bike and ride it.

IMO, light weight is Mostly a marketing ploy. I had more fun on a 46-pound Schwinn Suburban or an almost-as-heavy 3-speed Robin Hood (Sturmey-Archer!!) as I have had on any bike since my childhood. Unless you race weight isn't really an issue ... and lately, even racers are saying aero is more impactful----for racers.

Treat yourself. I just don't want t you to disappoint yourself. Go buy or build a weight-weenie wars steed and thrash it soundly. So long as you are smiling, you win!

Last edited by Maelochs; 02-12-23 at 06:36 AM.
Maelochs is offline  
Likes For Maelochs:
Old 02-12-23, 07:40 AM
  #14  
OldsCOOL
Senior Member
 
OldsCOOL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: northern michigan
Posts: 13,303

Bikes: '77 Colnago Super, '76 Fuji The Finest, '88 Cannondale Criterium, '86 Trek 760, '87 Miyata 712

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Liked 579 Times in 308 Posts
My lightest bike is a Trek 760 with full 531 frame and tubular wheelset. It weighs 19lbs and just scoots when hammered. And today it would be considered heavy. Get the bike that turns you on or you just wont ride it as much.
OldsCOOL is offline  
Old 02-12-23, 07:49 AM
  #15  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,432

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 177 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5849 Post(s)
Liked 3,355 Times in 2,011 Posts
This is more about what makes you happy than any need so go for it if you want. My idea of a light bike is around 21-22 lbs but then I ride old steel racing bikes. I know they're old technology but then so am I, . No doubt new bikes are nicer in many ways but fixing up and riding old bikes makes me happy and that's what this is about.
bikemig is offline  
Likes For bikemig:
Old 02-12-23, 08:07 AM
  #16  
bblair
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 603

Bikes: Lynskey R230, Trek 5200, 1975 Raleigh Pro, 1973 Falcon ,Trek T50 Tandem and a 1968 Paramount in progress.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked 274 Times in 171 Posts
If you are looking for permission to buy a new bike, here it is: Go Buy the New Bike!

This coupon redeemable at a Local Bike Shop near you. Offer valid indefinitely.
bblair is offline  
Likes For bblair:
Old 02-12-23, 03:10 PM
  #17  
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Posts: 5,553

Bikes: Day6 Semi Recumbent "FIREBALL", 1981 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2018 Specialized Red Roubaix Expert mech., 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1041 Post(s)
Liked 742 Times in 479 Posts
Originally Posted by hsea17
Would there be any benefits for a man well over 60..........................................
If a new lighter bike = more fun and is easier to lug up the stairs, I'd buy it if I were you.

I'm 72, have PCa (Prostate Cancer) and ZERO TESTOSTERONE, biked yesterday 56 miles on my RANS V squared weighing in at 40+ pounds and worked my butt off in 16+mph winds. Had 1 short 1/2 mile section just 2.5 miles from home and end of ride with wind directly behind so was able to crank it up to 25.4mph. Was more fun than riding my Aero Giant Propel Advanced SL at 17lbs. hitting 36mph.

Buy and enjoy 'cause tomorrow ain't guaranteed.

Last edited by OldTryGuy; 02-12-23 at 03:13 PM.
OldTryGuy is offline  
Likes For OldTryGuy:
Old 02-12-23, 05:28 PM
  #18  
Biker395 
Seat Sniffer
 
Biker395's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 5,506

Bikes: Serotta Legend Ti; 2006 Schwinn Fastback Pro and 1996 Colnago Decor Super C96; 2003 Univega Alpina 700; 2000 Schwinn Super Sport

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 891 Post(s)
Liked 1,582 Times in 479 Posts
On paper, considering pure physics, a lighter bike will make little difference in speed. But they have a way of feeling livelier and more pleasurable to ride.

Go test ride one!
__________________
Proud parent of a happy inner child ...

Biker395 is offline  
Likes For Biker395:
Old 02-12-23, 08:37 PM
  #19  
Daniel4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,480

Bikes: Sekine 1979 ten speed racer

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1470 Post(s)
Liked 630 Times in 432 Posts
I'm 61 and the bikes I ride are all heavy- like 35lb plus pack. If I need to carry a bike up or down the stairs, I just lift by the top tube on the palm of one hand and hold the rest of the bike against my back like a knap sack or performing one half of a barbell back squat. The rest of the work is in the legs.

Who knows in ten or fifteen years?

I'm not concerned with speed. Everybody passes me on the trails and bike lanes.

Last edited by Daniel4; 02-12-23 at 08:41 PM.
Daniel4 is offline  
Likes For Daniel4:
Old 02-12-23, 08:44 PM
  #20  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 12,415

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1486 Post(s)
Liked 708 Times in 436 Posts
That's a sub-20 lb bike. While it's possible to get one that's much lighter these days, it's far from being 'heavy.' If you want a new bike, go for it; but you'll barely notice 4 pounds' difference from a fancy new light bike when going up a set of stairs.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Likes For BlazingPedals:
Old 02-13-23, 07:15 AM
  #21  
staehpj1
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,567
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1119 Post(s)
Liked 624 Times in 472 Posts
I'll just say that while yes I think a lighter bike is nice and makes a difference, my light bike is just a bit heavier than the heavy bike you mention. I guess that is because all my bikes were fairly inexpensive and are either fairly of very old.

All that said, buy what makes you happy assuming you can afford it.
staehpj1 is offline  
Likes For staehpj1:
Old 02-13-23, 07:27 AM
  #22  
RB1-luvr
I don't know.
 
RB1-luvr's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: South Meriden, CT
Posts: 1,729

Bikes: '90 B'stone RB-1, '92 B'stone RB-2, '89 SuperGo Access Comp, '03 Access 69er, '23 Trek 520, '14 Ritchey Road Logic, '09 Kestrel Evoke, '17 Surly Wednesday, '89 Centurion Accordo, '15 CruX, '17 Ridley X-Night

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked 558 Times in 304 Posts
if you do get a lighter bike, keep the old heavier one. I like that feeling of going back and forth with them and feeling the difference.
RB1-luvr is offline  
Likes For RB1-luvr:
Old 02-13-23, 09:07 AM
  #23  
LeeG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 5,170
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 71 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by hsea17
Would there be any benefits for a man well over 60 who exercises regularly but varies the week between slow jogging/swimming and cycling 3-5 hours with a lighter bike except when I carry it up the stairs? My current bike weighs about 9 kg + ! I can still cycle at a speed of 17 - 19 mph but then it's mostly flat road? I have a low/normal body weight versus height so not much to gain by losing weight and could actually like to gain a few kilos, but in muscle but that is not easy at this age.
Any input welome
hsea17
When I had my bike shop I told customers that focusing on weight matters for liting the bike up stairs otherwise for a non racer itís somewhat irrelevant. And for a racer it matters if your competition is a few feet away from you otherwise the extremes in light weight come at significant cost and noticeable reduction in durability.
Thereís nothing like seeing a training partner leave you in the dust riding on wheels and tires that significantly out weigh yours.
In other words itís the motor, not the bike.
LeeG is offline  
Likes For LeeG:
Old 02-13-23, 09:34 AM
  #24  
hsea17
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 98

Bikes: Giant SCR / Felt FR5 / Trek Emonda ALR 6 / Trek Domane AL2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanks for all the posts. I agree with all of your opinions. From those who don't believe that a lighter bike makes me faster to those who say "treat yourself and stretch it to the point that you can't take anything with you whether the coffin is made of precious wood or a cardboard box . However in reality I probably lean more towards "it's not about the bike but the engine" I had a friend who unfortunately died a few years ago who had the thighs of a track cyclist and beat the rest of us with he using a old folding bike. But he was a rare example of a natural athlete, whatever the sport. Well, I'm not there, but I like speed on the bike and participate (Goal is to finish every year not race) annually in a triathlon with hills that go up to 20% + gradient but have not yet had to get off the bike as many prefer to save energy so a lighter bike will at least me a plus in that race. However I also start to understand that also my time is limited on this wonderful earth, even if my head are still like a boy when it comes to sport so yes I think it will be a new bike this spring.
Thanks & Regards
hsea17
hsea17 is offline  
Likes For hsea17:
Old 02-13-23, 09:38 AM
  #25  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 29,264

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r, Marin Muirwoods 29er, Trek FX Alpha 7.0

Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5151 Post(s)
Liked 3,411 Times in 2,235 Posts
sounds like the OP's bike is pretty light, as it is. maybe he needs a heavier bike
rumrunn6 is offline  
Likes For rumrunn6:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.