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1978 Huffy All Pro 10 Speed (restoration)

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1978 Huffy All Pro 10 Speed (restoration)

Old 04-03-10, 02:14 PM
  #1  
TFS Jake
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1978 Huffy All Pro 10 Speed (restoration)

At least I think that's what it's called.

EDIT: So it's a Murray.

Here is it so far


Does anyone have more info on this bike?

Last edited by TFS Jake; 04-03-10 at 02:29 PM.
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Old 04-03-10, 02:20 PM
  #2  
Amani576
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Frankly...
It's not worth restoring.
It's cheap hi-ten steel tubing, extremely low-end everything, and wasn't built very well.
I mean, if you want to build it back up for a cheap cruiser, go for it.
I just hope you didn't spend too much/any money on it.
-Gene-
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Old 04-03-10, 02:22 PM
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Mos6502
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It's actually a Murray, not a Huffy.
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Old 04-03-10, 02:29 PM
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TFS Jake
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I'm not spending but about 40 dollars on it, total. All I have are mountain bikes and hybrids and I wanted a road bike.
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Old 04-03-10, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Amani576 View Post
It's cheap hi-ten steel tubing, extremely low-end everything, and wasn't built very well.
Yeah, I could tell when I was pulling it all apart.
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Old 04-03-10, 03:25 PM
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We used to use these bikes for bike tossing contests. I would definitely NOT restore that bike. I think you should save whatever money you were planning to blow on it, and buy a real bike used after you've saved a couple hundred bucks. You can get some fantastic deals at yard sale. I bought a Cannondale all Dura Ace road racing bike along with Look pedals, and all the riding clothing including Sidi shoes (and a watch) for 40 bucks once.
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Old 04-03-10, 03:31 PM
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Maybe restore is the wrong word? If you have all the parts, it'd be worth repacking the bearings and putting new tires on. More than that, maybe not. But there's nothing wrong with it.
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Old 04-03-10, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Mos6502 View Post
Maybe restore is the wrong word? If you have all the parts, it'd be worth repacking the bearings and putting new tires on. More than that, maybe not. But there's nothing wrong with it.
Very much the wrong word, i'm pretty much just replacing the few things that are broken, and putting it back together.
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Old 04-03-10, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by TFS Jake View Post
Very much the wrong word, i'm pretty much just replacing the few things that are broken, and putting it back together.
Even crap bikes deserve a refurb! Save the Murray. Years from now, it'll be one of those little bits of history that most often gets destroyed.
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Old 04-03-10, 04:55 PM
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unterhausen
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I'm not sure if I'm kidding about this, but you should think of the poor bike mechanics that might be asked the impossible (i.e. to try to fix this bike-like-object) and take it to the recycling center.
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Old 04-03-10, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
I'm not sure if I'm kidding about this, but you should think of the poor bike mechanics that might be asked the impossible (i.e. to try to fix this bike-like-object) and take it to the recycling center.
You don't need a bike mechanic when you have a flat head screw driver, an adjustable wrench, and an American made bike.
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Old 04-03-10, 05:20 PM
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I would not put any money into it. If you spend some time looking, you can find something worth working on for around $25. Whenever I run across a Murray or Huffy, I just take them straight to my favorite thrift store.
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Old 04-03-10, 06:28 PM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
I would not put any money into it. If you spend some time looking, you can find something worth working on for around $25. Whenever I run across a Murray or Huffy, I just take them straight to my favorite thrift store.

If they are worthless why bother to give them to a charity....unless subconsciously you believe they have worth... to some rider?
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Old 04-03-10, 06:38 PM
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I commuted for a year on a Huffy 3 speed I paid $25 for. I could have paid over $1000 for a Pashley that would have been a worse bike for the job...

Everyone assumes that just because it's not a bike built for competition, it must not be worth using, it's a silly, biased viewpoint. I don't think the OP is planning on doing any time trials with his All-Pro - so there's no real reason he shouldn't repair the bike and ride it if he wants to. It should be perfectly suited to toodling round the neighborhood or going to the post office as any bike costing five times as much.
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Old 04-03-10, 07:03 PM
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I think it's worth spending a little money on because you'll get your money's worth out of the stuff you buy for it. You'll put it to good use. A cheap bike can provide a lot of service.
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Old 04-03-10, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Mos6502 View Post
It should be perfectly suited to toodling round the neighborhood or going to the post office as any bike costing five times as much.
That's what I plan on using it for.

I got it torn completely down, and all I used was an adjustable wrench, and a flathead screwdriver. The bike is clearly low quality, but I plan on keeping it just to have. Like I said earlier, I live in a place (Alabama) where no one is serious about cycling, so there is no used market. I spent 4 dollars on the tube, 20 on the bike, and about 5 hours of work. I now have a bike that I can do w/e the heck I want on it and not worry.
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Old 04-03-10, 08:39 PM
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Originally Posted by soonerbills View Post
If they are worthless why bother to give them to a charity....unless subconsciously you believe they have worth... to some rider?
I am amazed the Huffys, Roadmasters, and etc., that people gobble up at the thrift stores, sometimes at pretty substantial prices. So you are right, they do have a value to someone, just not me.

I donate a lot of stuff, and I am amazed how quick some of the "worthless" items are scooped up, mainly by the semi-pro flea market crowd. I assume they know their business, so apparently they are able to turn it at a profit.

Last edited by wrk101; 04-04-10 at 11:37 AM.
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Old 04-03-10, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
I am amazed the Huffys, Roadmasters, and etc., that people gobble up at the thrift stores, sometimes at pretty substantial prices. So you are right, they do have a value to someone, just not me.
I won't argue that point. I too find them not something I would buy but only because I know that there are better deals out there. But to some they are only a tool and so as long as it works it is worth buying. Being a little more knowledgeable about bikes can make you somewhat jaded!
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Old 04-03-10, 09:04 PM
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The quality of the bike aside, I don't see what needs to be "restored." Paint looks fine, all it needs is a little refurbishing. Throw on a pair of decent rims (with a coaster rear hub) from a donor, throw the brake and derailer systems away, and put a single ring on the front.

I normally don't encourage such conversions, but on one of these, making a drop-bar coaster SS is sometimes the best and easiest way to make them reliable and enjoyable.

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Old 04-03-10, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
I normally don't encourage such conversions, but on one of these, making a drop-bar coaster SS is sometimes the best and easiest way to make them reliable and enjoyable.
Yeah I used the wrong word in "restore".

I'm not sure about the SS conversion, I think I may make it a 5 speed though.
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Old 04-03-10, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by TFS Jake View Post
I'm not sure about the SS conversion, I think I may make it a 5 speed though.
Try to dig up a chainring with guards on both side; it'll keep the chain from trying to wiggle itself off under harsh shifting or road bumps.

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Old 04-04-10, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
Try to dig up a chainring with guards on both side; it'll keep the chain from trying to wiggle itself off under harsh shifting or road bumps.
Good idea, thanks.
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Old 04-04-10, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by TFS Jake View Post
Good idea, thanks.
I don't know. There's no substitute for correct chain length and adequate derailleur tension. You can get a new Falcon rear derailleur from Amazon which is a lot like the unit on that Huffy. Its spring may be tired due to rust pits or fatigue cracks, if you have a problem with the chain coming off. I've had lots of bikes with no chainguards, good ones and cheap ones, and no problem with chain derailment if the chain tension was good.
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Old 04-04-10, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by garage sale GT View Post
I don't know. There's no substitute for correct chain length and adequate derailleur tension. You can get a new Falcon rear derailleur from Amazon which is a lot like the unit on that Huffy. Its spring may be tired due to rust pits or fatigue cracks, if you have a problem with the chain coming off. I've had lots of bikes with no chainguards, good ones and cheap ones, and no problem with chain derailment if the chain tension was good.
I was talking about making it a 5 speed, so I would remove the front derailer.
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Old 04-04-10, 10:43 PM
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This would be a good bike to learn basic repair on. My first bike to work on was a low end Schwinn followed by a Huffy.
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