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Tires- Tube or tubeless?

Old 05-22-23, 04:48 PM
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Billydog
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Tires- Tube or tubeless?

I been looking at getting a set of tires for my vintage 80's style road bike..
Whats better tube or tubeless tires?
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Old 05-22-23, 05:02 PM
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What's on it now?
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Old 05-22-23, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
What's on it now?
Good question....I'm not sure.. lol
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Old 05-22-23, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
What's on it now?

Continental Grand Prix 5000 Performance Road Bike Tire are on there now.

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Old 05-22-23, 05:46 PM
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Tube or tubeless and what size?
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Old 05-22-23, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Billydog
I been looking at getting a set of tires for my vintage 80's style road bike..
Whats better tube or tubeless tires?
well your rims are not tubeless compatible right? that would answer that question unless you have newer rims.
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Old 05-22-23, 05:48 PM
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How come these tires look like they hardly have any tread?
Continental Grand Prix Continental Grand Prix
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Old 05-22-23, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Billydog
How come these tires look like they hardly have any tread?
Continental Grand Prix
Because they donít.
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Old 05-22-23, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by fooferdoggie
well your rims are not tubeless compatible right? that would answer that question unless you have newer rims.
Good answer... I never thought of that.... You are probably correct.
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Old 05-22-23, 06:33 PM
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He IS correct
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Old 05-22-23, 06:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Billydog
I been looking at getting a set of tires for my vintage 80's style road bike..
Whats better tube or tubeless tires?
stay with tubes and tires (make sured tires are not tubeless ready tires). you can convert non tubeless rims to tubless but it is not pretty or reliable especially for road rims
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Old 05-22-23, 06:49 PM
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Tires for a vintage drop handlebar race/road bike? Tubulars = best.
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Old 05-22-23, 07:16 PM
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I would semi-agree-ish with Wildwood but in the end open tubulars would probably be the most sensible option for most people these days. It gives you the handmade casing and feel of a tubular with the ease of a clincher for tire removal and tube replacement.
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Old 05-23-23, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes
in the end open tubulars would probably be the most sensible option for most people
"open tubulars" is really just a marketing term for high-end clincher tires. Back in the day all clinchers were relatively heavy with casings that were not very compliant. These days there are plenty of tubed tires with highly compliant casings and light weight. Some companies call these "open tubulars" because the casings are similar to what a good tubular uses. Other companies have the equivalent performance tire but don't describe it as an open tubular.
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Old 05-23-23, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by KerryIrons
"open tubulars" is really just a marketing term for high-end clincher tires. Back in the day all clinchers were relatively heavy with casings that were not very compliant. These days there are plenty of tubed tires with highly compliant casings and light weight. Some companies call these "open tubulars" because the casings are similar to what a good tubular uses. Other companies have the equivalent performance tire but don't describe it as an open tubular.
Not quite but sort of I guess. A typical clincher is going to be a vulcanized tire throughout whereas an open tubular is going to be un-vulcanized and built nearly exactly like a tubular tire but with beads.

Yes there are some clinchers that are quite good light and compliant but they are not built the same as a tubular so hence not an open tubular.

Not everything is just marketing and even if it was not all marketing is always terrible. I am quite happy with the ride of open tubulars marketing or not they ride quite nicely and look good.
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Old 05-23-23, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Billydog
How come these tires look like they hardly have any tread?
Continental Grand Prix
Riding on hard, relatively smooth surfaces, like pavement, a tread pattern would increase rolling resistance. Smooth is fast.
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Old 05-28-23, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
He IS correct
Though you could still opt for tubeless tires run with a tube though. Though not sure why you'd do this unless you really want a specific model tire and it's not available in a tube-only option.
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Old 05-30-23, 08:12 PM
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Misnomer for tubeless is that they are lighter than tube type, and when you first use tubeless that is true, but every 3 to 6 months you have to put in fresh sealant, the first time you add sealant that tire will weigh the same or more than a tube tire will be, and the second time you have to add sealant after the initial application you will definitely weigh more than a tubed tire.

Mounting a tubeless tire can be a *****, they are extremely tight fitting which is necessary to make a solid seal against the rim, but in the mean time you're cussing like a Marine. Then you have to have a special pump designed for tubeless tires, because you need a blast of air to seat the bead onto the rim.

Now you can begin to see that a tubeless set up is more expensive, the tires and wheels are more expensive, you have to buy sealant, you have to buy a special pump, money money money.

Going tubeless means, you may need to carry extra sealant, tubeless plugs, a sewing kit, super glue, and a high-volume pump to repair a large puncture or sidewall tear. You’ll also need a spare tube or two in case you can’t make the tire airtight after making the repair. All of this gear adds weight and costs. Things to consider if you are considering to go tubeless.

A lot of other forums I've been on some people who have gone tubeless are quietly switching back.
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Old 05-30-23, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Misnomer for tubeless is that they are lighter than tube type, and when you first use tubeless that is true, but every 3 to 6 months you have to put in fresh sealant, the first time you add sealant that tire will weigh the same or more than a tube tire will be, and the second time you have to add sealant after the initial application you will definitely weigh more than a tubed tire.

Mounting a tubeless tire can be a *****, they are extremely tight fitting which is necessary to make a solid seal against the rim, but in the mean time you're cussing like a Marine. Then you have to have a special pump designed for tubeless tires, because you need a blast of air to seat the bead onto the rim.

Now you can begin to see that a tubeless set up is more expensive, the tires and wheels are more expensive, you have to buy sealant, you have to buy a special pump, money money money.

Going tubeless means, you may need to carry extra sealant, tubeless plugs, a sewing kit, super glue, and a high-volume pump to repair a large puncture or sidewall tear. Youíll also need a spare tube or two in case you canít make the tire airtight after making the repair. All of this gear adds weight and costs. Things to consider if you are considering to go tubeless.

A lot of other forums I've been on some people who have gone tubeless are quietly switching back.
Honest question: have you run tubeless, or is this all hearsay?
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Old 05-30-23, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Misnomer for tubeless is that they are lighter than tube type, and when you first use tubeless that is true, but every 3 to 6 months you have to put in fresh sealant, the first time you add sealant that tire will weigh the same or more than a tube tire will be, and the second time you have to add sealant after the initial application you will definitely weigh more than a tubed tire.

Mounting a tubeless tire can be a *****, they are extremely tight fitting which is necessary to make a solid seal against the rim, but in the mean time you're cussing like a Marine. Then you have to have a special pump designed for tubeless tires, because you need a blast of air to seat the bead onto the rim.

Now you can begin to see that a tubeless set up is more expensive, the tires and wheels are more expensive, you have to buy sealant, you have to buy a special pump, money money money.

Going tubeless means, you may need to carry extra sealant, tubeless plugs, a sewing kit, super glue, and a high-volume pump to repair a large puncture or sidewall tear. Youíll also need a spare tube or two in case you canít make the tire airtight after making the repair. All of this gear adds weight and costs. Things to consider if you are considering to go tubeless.

A lot of other forums I've been on some people who have gone tubeless are quietly switching back.
At least you have a open mind on the subject! In reality tubeless is great and there is a reason why it is so popular with most engaged cyclists. I could disassemble your screed one exaggeration at a time but not sure it is necessary given how obvious the flaws are.
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Old 05-30-23, 09:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged
At least you have a open mind on the subject! In reality tubeless is great and there is a reason why it is so popular with most engaged cyclists. I could disassemble your screed one exaggeration at a time but not sure it is necessary given how obvious the flaws are.
geez.

An endless FAQ to tubeless bicycle tyres - CyclingTips

Tube Vs Tubeless Bike Tires: Pros and Cons - Where The Road Forks

The internet listings go on and on, but I guess I ran into a religious zealot.
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Old 05-30-23, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
geez.

An endless FAQ to tubeless bicycle tyres - CyclingTips

Tube Vs Tubeless Bike Tires: Pros and Cons - Where The Road Forks

The internet listings go on and on, but I guess I ran into a religious zealot.
Many of your claims about tubeless are nonsense...Hence my question about whether you've ever actually tried it.
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Old 05-30-23, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Misnomer for tubeless is that they are lighter than tube type, and when you first use tubeless that is true, but every 3 to 6 months you have to put in fresh sealant, the first time you add sealant that tire will weigh the same or more than a tube tire will be, and the second time you have to add sealant after the initial application you will definitely weigh more than a tubed tire.

Mounting a tubeless tire can be a *****, they are extremely tight fitting which is necessary to make a solid seal against the rim, but in the mean time you're cussing like a Marine. Then you have to have a special pump designed for tubeless tires, because you need a blast of air to seat the bead onto the rim.

Now you can begin to see that a tubeless set up is more expensive, the tires and wheels are more expensive, you have to buy sealant, you have to buy a special pump, money money money.

Going tubeless means, you may need to carry extra sealant, tubeless plugs, a sewing kit, super glue, and a high-volume pump to repair a large puncture or sidewall tear. Youíll also need a spare tube or two in case you canít make the tire airtight after making the repair. All of this gear adds weight and costs. Things to consider if you are considering to go tubeless.

A lot of other forums I've been on some people who have gone tubeless are quietly switching back.
Some of this is true. Some of it is exaggeration. Some of it is true only sometimes. Some of it is just false.

Iím going by my actual experience with multiple bikes, not an article I read somewhere.
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Old 05-30-23, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Misnomer for tubeless is that they are lighter than tube type, and when you first use tubeless that is true, but every 3 to 6 months you have to put in fresh sealant, the first time you add sealant that tire will weigh the same or more than a tube tire will be, and the second time you have to add sealant after the initial application you will definitely weigh more than a tubed tire.
Dried sealant is significantly lighter than fresh sealant.

You really shouldn't have any more than 60 grams of liquid sealant in a 28mm road tire. If you ride 5000 miles a year you'll likely only top off sealant twice before you get a new rear tire. Let's say 50 grams dried sealant and 60 grams liquid sealant in the tire after one year. Add the valve stem 7 grams. 117 grams tubeless, I run 80 gram tubes in my road tires, so 37 gram weight penalty at the end of one year in order to not have to change a tube for 90% of punctures. Pretty good trade off there.

I carry a spare tube whether riding tubeless or tubed. It's a wash on that account. On long solo centuries on a tubed bike, I'd carry a patch kit, two spare tubes and a spare tire.

An air compressor is handy for other things besides installing tubeless, might as well get one.

...
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Old 05-30-23, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Misnomer
Your use of this word is a misnomer.

Also, your information is false. How many miles have you ridden on tubeless road tires?

Every single flat I have seen on group rides for the past three years has been a tube, and the tires are split about 50/50.

I now carry only a plug kit and a couple of CO2 cartridges. I also have had a puncture on a solo ride this year and I didn't know it had happened until I went to top up the tires the next morning and they were down 20 psi. That and the sealant on the frame were the only clues.
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