Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Chain compressor tool

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Chain compressor tool

Old 05-01-21, 12:55 AM
  #1  
PimpMan
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 75
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Chain compressor tool

Need a tool to connect split chain together, i believe its called "chain press", but way too expensive for this simple design $15.


I have this chain breaker tool, can i convert it to use as chain compressor tool say if i put something that prevents pin from going trough the opening at the exit/opening end where the pin come out of the chain?





Last edited by PimpMan; 05-01-21 at 01:02 AM.
PimpMan is offline  
Old 05-01-21, 01:01 AM
  #2  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 12,778

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1371 Post(s)
Liked 603 Times in 451 Posts
I used a washer to act as a spacer back when I used that type tool.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 05-01-21, 08:25 AM
  #3  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 15,169

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3011 Post(s)
Liked 1,336 Times in 934 Posts
If I read this correctly the question is how to not push the pin all the way out of the side plates. The classic method is to stop turning the tool's handle/pushing pin before the chain pin falls out. Sure this takes both thinking before the pin is fully out and looking at the pin's partially removed state then reusing the tool to continue the push a tad more. Once this technique is done it becomes obvious why many BICYCLE chain tools have no pin push limit device, because it's so easy to just check during the process. Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Likes For Andrew R Stewart:
Old 05-01-21, 05:01 PM
  #4  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 22,865

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2694 Post(s)
Liked 1,407 Times in 873 Posts
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
If I read this correctly the question is how to not push the pin all the way out of the side plates. The classic method is to stop turning the tool's handle/pushing pin before the chain pin falls out.
Chain plier tools like the VAR #303 or Gian Robert would come with pins just long enough to not push the chain pin all the way out. Worked pretty well until chains got narrower and narrower to accommodate more and more sprockets on the cluster. Of course, now with the riveted chains you may as well push the pin all the way out and re-connect with a master link.

And tools like the Park CT-2 chain pliers had an adjustable stroke that could accommodate a range of chain widths.

JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 05-02-21, 10:26 AM
  #5  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,750

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Liked 194 Times in 150 Posts
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
Once this technique is done it becomes obvious why many BICYCLE chain tools have no pin push limit device, because it's so easy to just check during the process.
THIS^^
Most chain tools also have more than one way to hold the chain. This allows one of the side plates to be supported as the pin is pushed through *just enough* to release the link, and when reassembling the link the other side plate is supported allowing the "tight link" to be released.
sweeks is offline  
Old 05-02-21, 05:29 PM
  #6  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,750

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Liked 194 Times in 150 Posts
Here are some images of my old CYCLO chain breaker... I've had this thing for 50 years.

Vintage "Cyclo" chain tool.


The "business end" of the tool.


This is the chain in position to be opened. With care, the pin remains in the side plate while providing clearance to remove the inner section. The side plate away from the tool's pin is supported.


This is the chain positioned to relieve the "tight link" after driving the pin to close the chain. The side plate away from the tool's pin is unsupported.
sweeks is offline  
Likes For sweeks:
Old 05-02-21, 06:14 PM
  #7  
Crankycrank
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 2,441
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 471 Post(s)
Liked 351 Times in 278 Posts
^^^ I've been waiting 40 years for my Cyclo tool to break so I can get a new one with a nice cushy handle but it just keeps working, dang it. Anyways excellent post on how to use a chain tool in the different grooves properly.
Crankycrank is offline  
Likes For Crankycrank:
Old 05-02-21, 06:19 PM
  #8  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,750

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Liked 194 Times in 150 Posts
Originally Posted by Crankycrank View Post
...how to use a chain tool in the different grooves properly.
Hahahaha... I read the instructions! They're long-gone, but somehow my otherwise porous memory retains them.
sweeks is offline  
Old 05-02-21, 06:28 PM
  #9  
kingston 
Jedi Master
 
kingston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Posts: 3,555

Bikes: https://stinkston.blogspot.com/p/my-bikes.html

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1630 Post(s)
Liked 372 Times in 241 Posts
That chain press is for the master link on a motorcycle chain. I've seen guys on the trail replace a master link with a small socket and a rock, but the press is a lot easier. There's no need for a chain press with a bicycle chain.
kingston is offline  
Old 05-04-21, 01:15 PM
  #10  
PimpMan
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 75
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by kingston View Post
That chain press is for the master link on a motorcycle chain. I've seen guys on the trail replace a master link with a small socket and a rock, but the press is a lot easier. There's no need for a chain press with a bicycle chain.


My question was more on how to connect the new chain permanently (without using quick link), but with pin that you need to press in. how can this be done without a chain press?

I don't want to use quick link because sometimes they fall off and i want to use this for coaster (brake) hub.
PimpMan is offline  
Old 05-04-21, 01:34 PM
  #11  
kingston 
Jedi Master
 
kingston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Posts: 3,555

Bikes: https://stinkston.blogspot.com/p/my-bikes.html

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1630 Post(s)
Liked 372 Times in 241 Posts
You just push the pin in with the chain-break as others have explained above. Line it up with the pin on the tool and push it in. A chain press pushes two pins on one side of the master link into the plate on the other side. Lookup motorcycle master link and you'll see what I mean. By the way, track sprinters use quick links so I wouldn't be too concerned about their integrity on your coaster brake bike if you decide to go that route. All of my bike chains have quick links.
kingston is offline  
Likes For kingston:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.