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How can you figure out whether to restore or not.

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How can you figure out whether to restore or not.

Old 07-15-21, 09:15 PM
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Unlovedwarrior
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How can you figure out whether to restore or not.

How do you know what to do with a possible vintage frenchy. Sell as is restore then sell part it out or just toss it out?
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Old 07-15-21, 09:20 PM
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Brand name needed to answer. Herse?

Constructeur, Handmade, or Production -

Unique or pedestrian.

Original paint, original components

how old, how much rust


Alternatively - learn French, couple of tools, some grease and ... and take that 'vintage frenchy' for a spin. Ooohh, La La.

Last edited by Wildwood; 07-15-21 at 09:30 PM.
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Old 07-15-21, 09:40 PM
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Refurbish it!

Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
Ooohh, La La.
.
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Old 07-15-21, 09:49 PM
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Old 07-15-21, 10:12 PM
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Seriously, really depends as with ANY bike will the result fit your needs? Have you assessed basically what needs to be done?

on a French bike-
things that might crop up-
Pivo “death” stem
simplex black plastic derailleurs
( rear ... maybe, front, exchange before trouble)
rigida steel rims- any steel rim when wet does not stop well.

a truthful assessment on your experience.
if a first time project, stick with a Japanese bike. Cables, tubes, tires, and the associated bits are probably all you will require.
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Old 07-15-21, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
Brand name needed to answer. Peugeot

Constructeur, Handmade, or Production - I'm assuming production

Unique or pedestrian. Idk pedestrian I guess

Original paint, original components everything original including shockingly decent decals.

how old, how much rust idk age or model chain and drivetrain really rusty and some rust on it in different places but tires and tubes still hold air and even with rust still rides ok.


Alternatively - learn French, couple of tools, some grease and ... and take that 'vintage frenchy' for a spin. Ooohh, La La.
Brand name needed to answer. Peugeot

Constructeur, Handmade, or Production - I'm assuming production

Unique or pedestrian. Idk pedestrian I guess

Original paint, original components everything original including shockingly decent decals.

how old, how much rust idk age or model chain and drivetrain really rusty and some rust on it in different places but tires and tubes still hold air and even with rust still rides ok.
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Old 07-15-21, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
Seriously, really depends as with ANY bike will the result fit your needs? Have you assessed basically what needs to be done?

on a French bike-
things that might crop up-
Pivo “death” stem
simplex black plastic derailleurs
( rear ... maybe, front, exchange before trouble)
rigida steel rims- any steel rim when wet does not stop well.

a truthful assessment on your experience.
if a first time project, stick with a Japanese bike. Cables, tubes, tires, and the associated bits are probably all you will require.
Idk what I want to do, but as for what needs to be done basically remove all rust and/or replace chain and that stuff, brakes still work scary good but possibly replace the two shifter cables and the brake lines when I finally replace the brakes. Definitely replace tires really soon 26"
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Old 07-15-21, 10:37 PM
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Do you have bicycle type tools? Ever repaired anything?

Surface rust is an easy fix. Deeper rust is more work. Rusty components clean well if you can dis&reassemble.
Whether riding or selling - clean stuff is worth much more.

Does the frame fit your size body?
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Old 07-15-21, 10:50 PM
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Use the "Gallery" feature to post pics before 10 posts, or get to 10 posts and put the pics up here. Then we can help you along the way. Against my better judgment, I have a weakness for French bikes. Spent the evening with a fellow BF member performing minor surgery on a particularly stubborn fixed cup of a French threaded bottom bracket on my Peugeot PX10.
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Old 07-16-21, 12:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Unlovedwarrior View Post
Brand name needed to answer. Peugeot

Constructeur, Handmade, or Production - I'm assuming production

Unique or pedestrian. Idk pedestrian I guess

...

how old, how much rust idk age or model chain and drivetrain really rusty and some rust on it in different places but tires and tubes still hold air and even with rust still rides ok.
...put it out by the curb and hope someone else takes it.
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Old 07-16-21, 03:05 AM
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Old 07-16-21, 03:48 AM
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If you have any interest in riding this bike or a "French" bike of this vintage, clean it up, soak it with WD-40 and put it away till you find another "French" donor bike with a clean crank set, functional drivetrain and hopefully aluminum rimmed wheels. If you have the tools and knack, build a bike from the 2 and add $50 for tires, tubes and cables, you might have a $100 bike. If your really into detailing, you might be able get more for a well polished "restoration" I think you can get $20-25 for the brakes if you "part it out". It is an intrinsically cool bike so well worth saving, but not something to try and make a buck on.
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Old 07-16-21, 04:44 AM
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Old 07-16-21, 05:15 AM
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If you heart is set on this bike but this is your first bike overhaul this NOT the bike to start on. Besides the rust issues being French it will have some eccentricities such as odd thread sizes, etc. Store it for later and pick up something more standard to learn on. As someone else replied pick up an older Japanese bike to learn on. 1980's Fujis needing some TLC can often be had for pocket change and make very nice bikes when completed. They are good quality, easy to work on and even the low end models used good quality components. Strictly personal opinion but 1984 through 1986 seem to be the best years but any year is good.

Are you sure those 26" wheels? Look like 27's from here.

Last edited by Murray Missile; 07-16-21 at 05:24 AM.
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Old 07-16-21, 05:30 AM
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Fond memories of my first bike restoration in this thread. Frame doesn't look too bad at all from that picture. Would be a shame to chuck it. If it's not the right project for you, I'm sure someone in your area will be pleased to take it on.
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Old 07-16-21, 06:05 AM
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Yep definitely the right project for the right person. If you don't want to deal with it, move it on to someone who wants to fix it up. It's not worth much as is. You can also donate it to a bike co op.
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Old 07-16-21, 06:41 AM
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I had a blast teaching my gal about bike mechanical stuff while playing with restoring and refreshing (and lightening) the exact model of Peugeot.

If you can salvage most of the parts, it isn’t too bad, but Simplex mechs, cottered cranks, Mafac CPs and the fun shifters and brake levers require patience.

i have a set of steel wheels from the project that are orphans...
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Old 07-16-21, 06:47 AM
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First step is to binge as many threads you can on similar refurb topics here in the forum, including threads with detailed accounts (preferably go for the threads with lots of pictures) of others' experiences.

Then do another binge on every thread specific to rebuilding "Peugeot UO8" models.

That should get you started.

-Kurt
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Old 07-16-21, 08:14 AM
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I always look at the paint. The bike may be dirty but if the paint underneath is in good condition it will make any restoration easier. also if the paint is in good shape the bike will probably not have been ridden as much. You can get a beautiful result by deep cleaning the frame , rubbing out with white polishing compound , then either waxing or, like I often do, clear coating with Rustoleum Automotive clear. (warning, never spray this over fresh paint. Disaster lurks as it will alligator the finish if the paint is not THOUROUGHLY dry).

Also check to be sure the seat post and stem aren't stuck. that can be a show stopper. Beware of heliomatic rear freewheels. best to just replace the wheel rather than mess with them. Heavily rusted bike - stay away. wheels with severe hop in rim - look for new wheel. cotteed crank - you better have access to a cotter press.

Old French bikes in particular can have compatibility issues. They can usually be bought cheap though so buying a parts bike might be a good idea.

When things work out though you might just end up with something like this 1962 Pug I restored for the Bike Exchange a few years ago.

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Old 07-16-21, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Unlovedwarrior View Post
Idk what I want to do, but as for what needs to be done basically remove all rust and/or replace chain and that stuff, brakes still work scary good but possibly replace the two shifter cables and the brake lines when I finally replace the brakes. Definitely replace tires really soon 26"
make the rear shift cable the front. Buy one cable that way, same with the brakes...
But, those levers are I do not think to be trusted and even way back flexed an uncomfortable amount.
New front derailleur. locate one with the same basic cable housing need.
Rims look cringe worthy, can be derusted, Kroil the spoke nipples before any attempt to true the wheels.
Chain needed it appears
I would get new brake pads.
Tires probably Michelin Dynamic 27". Not 26"
Total up the shopping basket, including possible new cotters as the bottom bracket should be serviced
Consider your labor, ability and time. Tools at hand?
Could be reasonably nice when done, with the possible need for new or rebuilt wheels.
end value when done other than an entertaining bike? totally underwater I think.
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Old 07-16-21, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by capnjonny View Post
I always look at the paint. The bike may be dirty but if the paint underneath is in good condition it will make any restoration easier. also if the paint is in good shape the bike will probably not have been ridden as much. You can get a beautiful result by deep cleaning the frame , rubbing out with white polishing compound , then either waxing or, like I often do, clear coating with Rustoleum Automotive clear. (warning, never spray this over fresh paint. Disaster lurks as it will alligator the finish if the paint is not THOUROUGHLY dry).

Also check to be sure the seat post and stem aren't stuck. that can be a show stopper. Beware of heliomatic rear freewheels. best to just replace the wheel rather than mess with them. Heavily rusted bike - stay away. wheels with severe hop in rim - look for new wheel. cotteed crank - you better have access to a cotter press.

Old French bikes in particular can have compatibility issues. They can usually be bought cheap though so buying a parts bike might be a good idea.

When things work out though you might just end up with something like this 1962 Pug I restored for the Bike Exchange a few years ago.

exchanged rims or wheels, Suntour derailleurs, (plastic avoidance) new chain and looks like a freewheel too, Mafac half hoods abandoned, (reasonable as replacements are too expensive now), new pads, cables, housing.
turned out well.
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Old 07-16-21, 11:18 AM
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That Peugeot Mixte would cost a great deal to properly restore (way more than you could sell it for). If would also cost a fair amount just to get it road worthy and safe to ride. Again, the result would cost more than you could sell the bike for. And, based on the oxidized state, there is not much to part out and sell (no offense intended). That said...

Build it up as a junk bike (don't let that name offend you). A junk bike will (most likely) not be pretty but it will be road worthy and safe to ride. Replace only what is absolutely needed, such as cables, tires and brake pads. That, alone, will set you back close to a $100 (if you can do the work yourself). If you have to have a bike shop do the work, add another 100.00.

I often times build junk bikes for myself. They work great and do not have "steal me" written all over them. My last junk bike worked perfect and I had less than fifty dollars invested.

Looks pretty good from the street...


But not so good up close. None the less, ugly or not, it was a really good bike to ride...

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Old 07-16-21, 12:57 PM
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I think it's a cool bike and would be well worth restoring if you enjoy restoring things. @randyjawa is right, you wouldn't be able to sell it for anything near what it would cost you to restore. You'd basically be paying for the experience of having done it and the satisfaction of saving a cool old bike.

If you don't want to do anything with it, I'd try to find a new home for it. You might be able to sell it for a few bucks. You might have to give it away. Either way, you can probably find someone who wants to keep it out of the landfill.
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Old 07-16-21, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
Do you have bicycle type tools? Ever repaired anything? Actually yea I've been basically repairing a friend's motorized bike for him to exercise my problem solving, thinking out of the box and critical thinking plus I'm able to do normal guy stuff like that and other, I'm not like most guys when it comes to guy stuff but I'm learning. I've been buying new tools as I need them for different projects mainly woodworking and recently stuff for bikes.

Surface rust is an easy fix. Deeper rust is more work. Rusty components clean well if you can dis&reassemble. Yea rust removal won't be hard I'm sure I can dis and reassemble it.
Whether riding or selling - clean stuff is worth much more. I originally pulled it out to see if it was fixable/ridable, need something until I can afford a fuel pump for 17 Camry.

Does the frame fit your size body? Idk I think. Haven't got on it yet it rides in it's current shape had my useless brother test that.
Do you have bicycle type tools? Ever repaired anything? Actually yea I've been basically repairing a friend's motorized bike for him to exercise my problem solving, thinking out of the box and critical thinking plus I'm able to do normal guy stuff like that and other, I'm not like most guys when it comes to guy stuff but I'm learning. I've been buying new tools as I need them for different projects mainly woodworking and recently stuff for bikes. Surface rust is an easy fix. Deeper rust is more work. Rusty components clean well if you can dis&reassemble. Yea rust removal won't be hard I'm sure I can dis and reassemble it. Whether riding or selling - clean stuff is worth much more. I originally pulled it out to see if it was fixable/ridable, need something until I can afford a fuel pump for 17 Camry. Does the frame fit your size body? Idk I think. Haven't got on it yet it rides in it's current shape had my useless brother test that
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Old 07-16-21, 01:21 PM
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If your goal is to make a little money on it, just sell it as-is. There's no money to be made in bike restorations, especially with parts being on the wrong side of the supply-demand chart right now. Especially considering this bike will need French parts!

Doesn't make sense to part it out either since the only part of this bike that is in apparently decent condition is the frame. Clearly it lived outside for a long time!
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