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Best Spoke Prep?

Old 07-17-21, 06:05 PM
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Keefusb
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Best Spoke Prep?

Going to be building my first wheels from scratch. I'm trying to decide which spoke prep to use. I have heard that linseed oil is best, or blue Locktite, or plain old oil works best. There are also several purpose-made spoke prep compounds.

Looking for input and/or opinions on what to use.
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Old 07-17-21, 06:14 PM
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Being the first self made wheel set I strongly suggest LockTite is not used. Many, including me, have used oil or grease on tens of thousands of wheels with no issues. For customer wheels I generally use Spoke Prep more because they expect it. Andy
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Old 07-17-21, 06:48 PM
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I've always used Wheelsmith spoke prep on the threads and a dab of Anti-Seize on the shoulders of the nipples.
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Old 07-17-21, 07:57 PM
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I just finished building a couple of sets and used grease on both threads and the outside of the nipple. Seems to work fine but then I don't heavily stress my wheels so I make no claim to this being best practice. What I do know is that I keep my wheels around for quite a while and when the nipples stick to the spoke threads it makes truing a pain in the butt.

Anyway, here is November Dave's Youtube channel. He's got a couple wheel building videos that you can take to the bank as far as technique is concerned.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClG...ByZcAOEZKw3u6w

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Old 07-18-21, 05:35 AM
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I like linseed oil. It lubricates while you're building the wheel, then hardens over the course of a couple days into a varnish that locks the threads, but not so much that the wheel can't be trued again, if needed. A few bucks buys a lifetime supply, and you can use it on furniture as well.
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Old 07-18-21, 08:34 AM
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30 weight motor oil for the 30+ wheels I've built. 'Haven't had a problem with any of them.

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Old 07-18-21, 10:01 AM
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Rock N Roll Nipple Cream - This stuff is awesome
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Old 07-18-21, 10:26 AM
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I just use oil on the wheels I build. Over seven years ago my new custom bicycle that I specked the specific rims for. Came with what the shop decided. I ordered in the new spokes and rims of my choice and preceded to disassemble the wheels. The black stuff they had put on the nipples was more like glue then spoke prep. I finished disassembly and completed the rebuild of the wheels on my now custom bicycle. I have not had to true the wheels and when I checked there trueness with my dial indicators a few weeks ago there had been no movement out of true in over 7 years.
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Old 07-18-21, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
I like linseed oil. It lubricates while you're building the wheel, then hardens over the course of a couple days into a varnish that locks the threads, but not so much that the wheel can't be trued again, if needed. A few bucks buys a lifetime supply, and you can use it on furniture as well.
I really need to try that. Apart from my first wheel build, where the spokes came with spoke prep applied, I've only used oil.
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Old 07-18-21, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Keefusb View Post
Going to be building my first wheels from scratch. I'm trying to decide which spoke prep to use. I have heard that linseed oil is best, or blue Locktite, or plain old oil works best. There are also several purpose-made spoke prep compounds.

Looking for input and/or opinions on what to use.
Always used triflow myself never had an issue.
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Old 07-18-21, 04:46 PM
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I'm not a pro, but have built dozens of wheels. The only thing I use is a drop of motor oil on the threads. I've never had an issue with nipples loosening so I see no need for anything that acts as a thread locker.
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Old 07-18-21, 06:53 PM
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I've used oil, linseed oil, spoke prep, tri flow. They all work if you tension the wheel properly. I put a drop of tri flow on the nipple/rim interface once it's laced, prior to tensioning. I also usually put a drop of spoke freeze on the spoke/nipple when done.
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Old 07-18-21, 07:14 PM
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Seems like regular old oil is the consensus. I might go with Linseed oil on the rear NDS spokes, since they will have the least amount of tension on them.

I appreciate all the input!
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Old 07-18-21, 08:34 PM
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I use marine grease on both the spoke threads and the nipple seats on the rim. (Q-tips are perfect for those seats.)

The big plus - the nipple turn guaranteed. Number of years, weather, road salt ... absolutely doesn't matter.
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Old 07-18-21, 09:38 PM
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Loctite 567 thread sealer. It sets up firm and you can readjust the nipple later if necessary.
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Old 07-18-21, 11:08 PM
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You should lubricate the nipple rim interface and the spoke threads. In the interests of efficiency I like to immerse all the nipples in oil before building to accomplish both tasks at once. For aluminum on carbon anti seize on the rim eyets may help with galvanic corrosion. I like a little dt spoke freeze or light threadlocker dripped into the nipples after building as additional assurance against spoke loosening. Spokes will only loosen on a well built wheel if it's loaded beyond its design intentionsóbut things happen and it's not a terrible idea to have some mild thread locking. This is especially true on mountain bikes where sheer trauma to the rim is common. You should be able to make adjustments later if you do this.
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Old 07-19-21, 02:22 AM
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In the 90'so I built a set of wheels and used Militech gun oil since it was all I had and they never went out of true. That's all I've used since.
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Old 07-19-21, 07:19 AM
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Linseed oil on rear NDS and front wheel. Rear DS gets Finish Line Wet because that's usually the chain oil that's in the house, saving me a trip to the garage. That might change when I finish up the bottle in the garage, though.
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Old 07-25-21, 07:24 AM
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between the rim and the nipple, I have used SAE-10W, and it was still on there after a few years when I pulled the first wheelset I built apart.
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