Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

Converting a single speed to a fixie.

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Converting a single speed to a fixie.

Old 04-29-23, 02:04 PM
  #1  
BlueWindbreaker
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2023
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Converting a single speed to a fixie.

I have a Murray three speed bike that has a single speed freewheel for some reason. I got it for free and the tires would need to be replace. Itís worth less that 50 dollars. I want to convert it to a fixed gear but donít want to buy a new wheel so I was thinking of just crippling the free wheel by soldering it. Is there a way that this should be done? Is there a different way to cripple the freewheel so I can ride backwards?
BlueWindbreaker is offline  
Old 04-29-23, 04:13 PM
  #2  
TejanoTrackie 
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,748

Bikes: 32 frames + 80 wheels

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1317 Post(s)
Liked 739 Times in 422 Posts
Originally Posted by BlueWindbreaker
I have a Murray three speed bike that has a single speed freewheel for some reason. I got it for free and the tires would need to be replace. It’s worth less that 50 dollars. I want to convert it to a fixed gear but don’t want to buy a new wheel so I was thinking of just crippling the free wheel by soldering it. Is there a way that this should be done? Is there a different way to cripple the freewheel so I can ride backwards?
First off, you would have to weld it, since soldering is too weak to carry the load. The problem will be that when you try to backpedal, the welded freewheel will unscrew from the hub, since there is no lockring. You could, of course, tighten it with red Loctite to create a suicide hub, where the freewheel would be permanently bonded to the hub and could not be removed. As long as you keep brakes on it, it will be safe in the unlikely event the welding fails or the freewheel somehow manages to unscrew itself.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me

Last edited by TejanoTrackie; 04-30-23 at 07:23 AM.
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Old 04-29-23, 05:49 PM
  #3  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 12,697

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4017 Post(s)
Liked 3,542 Times in 2,367 Posts
I would not recommend trying to convert a freewheel to a fixed gear with a non-fixed gear hub. As TejanoTrackie suggested you could do some sketchy stuff with welding and a heavy threadlocking compound but it is not a good safe option and should be understood as a do at your own risk and know it is not really worth it.

I would just ride the bike as is and save your money and time for a proper fixed gear you want.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 05-01-23, 10:15 AM
  #4  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 24,736

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 153 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3485 Post(s)
Liked 3,153 Times in 1,807 Posts
Originally Posted by BlueWindbreaker
I have a Murray three speed bike that has a single speed freewheel for some reason. I got it for free and the tires would need to be replace. Itís worth less that 50 dollars. I want to convert it to a fixed gear but donít want to buy a new wheel so I was thinking of just crippling the free wheel by soldering it. Is there a way that this should be done? Is there a different way to cripple the freewheel so I can ride backwards?
Are you certain that you have a freewheel? Most 3-speed bikes use an internally-geared hub, with the ratchet mechanism inside the hub, and the sprocket is usually a simple splined sprocket and held onto the hub driver with a circlip. Is there a brand/model marking on the hub? Can you post some pictures of the hub and sprocket?

I suspect that in order to convert to a fixed gear, you will need a different wheel.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Likes For JohnDThompson:
Old 05-16-23, 05:57 AM
  #5  
somedodo
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2023
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
if you have the hub, how difficult/complicated is it to switch a bike from single speed to fixed gear (or vice versa). would it be better to have one bike of each?
somedodo is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 03:27 PM
  #6  
Broctoon
Super-duper Genius
 
Broctoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Muskrat Springs, Utah
Posts: 1,711
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 767 Post(s)
Liked 977 Times in 508 Posts
Originally Posted by somedodo
if you have the hub, how difficult/complicated is it to switch a bike from single speed to fixed gear (or vice versa). would it be better to have one bike of each?
It depends on the type.

There are hubs threaded on only one side. Some have fixed gear threads, and some have single speed threads. A fixed gear thread has the same diameter and pitch as the single speed, but with a second set of threads, outboard, slightly smaller diameter, and the reverse direction (counter-clockwise to tighten). This is where the lock ring goes. The primary or inboard threads are the same on both types. So you can put a single speed freewheel cog on a fixed gear hub with no issues. To put a fixed cog on a single speed hub, where there is no second set of (reverse) threads, you have no good way to keep it from coming loose, which is dangerous. It is easy to do, but it's usually a very bad idea.

Some hubs, called a flip-flop, have both sides threaded. They might be fixed threads on both sides, to allow for two different cog sizes, or fixed on one side and single speed on the other, giving you a choice of drivetrain types. I don't know if anyone makes a flip-flop with single speed on both sides.

If you don't have a flip-flop hub (or fixed gear hub) and you want to ride both types from time to time, you don't need two bikes. You can get two rear wheels. The wheel is easy to change according to your preference for a particular ride.

Last edited by Broctoon; 05-16-23 at 03:32 PM.
Broctoon is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.