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What is your preferred jockey wheel size?

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What is your preferred jockey wheel size?

Old 06-14-21, 06:37 PM
  #26  
livedarklions
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I wear boxer wheels.
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Old 06-14-21, 10:25 PM
  #27  
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There’s an aspect to this that has some validity. If you install a larger top/guide pulley and push the max cog the derailleur can handle, the larger diameter guide pulley “might” limit how much you can push the cog size.

By the same token, a larger lower/tension pulley will technically add a smidgen of chain wrap. Not really enough to improve wrap unless you are a link off.

John
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Old 06-14-21, 10:37 PM
  #28  
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42 of course

Also what about Huret? They had toothless wheels? It is pretty insensitive to those who use Huret to ask this question and I really think you, alo should apologize to them.
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Old 06-14-21, 10:47 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
On a related topic - what adverse effect comes from a worn tension pulley? Obviously, a worn guide pulley does negatively affect shifting precision and speed. But I suspect that with the tension pulley, given it spins freely and there is no play in the bearing, there shouldn't be much difference up until it is worn near round.

Am I wrong in thinking this?
With the plastic jockey wheels, the hole in the middle wears, and the jockey wheel can wobble. The chain can then rub on the side of the derailleur. Obviously, then it's time to do something about it.
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Old 06-15-21, 03:19 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
With the plastic jockey wheels, the hole in the middle wears, and the jockey wheel can wobble. The chain can then rub on the side of the derailleur. Obviously, then it's time to do something about it.
And that probably happens pretty quickly on a $2 derailleur.
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Old 06-15-21, 04:37 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
And that probably happens pretty quickly on a $2 derailleur.
You can think of them as disposable. If it costs $2.25 every 6 months, it is not a problem.

Where I am there is a lot of mud and dust. Mud can come off the front wheel, onto the chain, and onto the jockey wheels. Dust sticks to anything with oil on it. If I used aluminum jockey wheels with ball bearings, I am sure some dust and mud would find its way into the bearings. Disposable parts are idea in this situation.

Most likely this derailleur will never break. It is cheap because it is old style, and people selling modern bikes don't put old style derailleurs on them. You won't find a stronger derailleur.

Plastic jockey wheels in any derailleur will also wear out fast, compared to aluminum jockey wheels with ball bearings.

Last edited by alo; 06-15-21 at 04:42 AM.
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Old 06-15-21, 05:29 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post

Plastic jockey wheels in any derailleur will also wear out fast, compared to aluminum jockey wheels with ball bearings.
Not IME with typical Shimano 105/Ultegra or SRAM equivalents. I have been known to replace them occasionally, but I wouldn't say it was a regular thing.
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Old 06-15-21, 06:18 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
With the plastic jockey wheels, the hole in the middle wears, and the jockey wheel can wobble. The chain can then rub on the side of the derailleur. Obviously, then it's time to do something about it.
I’ve got over 35,000 miles on a Shimano 105 rear derailer, and that has never happened to it’s plastic jockey wheels… Of course, it cost more than two dollars.
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Old 06-15-21, 06:45 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
I’ve got over 35,000 miles on a Shimano 105 rear derailer, and that has never happened to it’s plastic jockey wheels… Of course, it cost more than two dollars.
I only fitted the $2.25 derailleur recently. I am yet to see how long the jockey wheels last.

The derailleur I had a problem with was a Shimano, which was on the bike when I bought it. Maybe not all Shimano jockey wheels are equal.
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Old 06-15-21, 11:24 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
Maybe not all Shimano jockey wheels are equal.
Some have plain bushes, some have sealed bearings. There are pros and cons to both types but they are rarely a problem. When I was doing a lot of seriously wet and muddy mountain biking I would often strip them down and clean after a big ride, but I don’t touch them on my road bikes.
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Old 06-15-21, 01:54 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
I’ve got over 35,000 miles on a Shimano 105 rear derailer, and that has never happened to it’s plastic jockey wheels… Of course, it cost more than two dollars.
They were not in stock when I replaced mine, but you can get bottom of the range Shimano derailleurs here for $3.75. There is a possibility they are imitation, and not genuine Shimano. Shimano are also made in S E Asia, so they can be made cheaply.

Most of the cost in the US is for transport and profit.

Last edited by alo; 06-15-21 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 06-15-21, 02:23 PM
  #37  
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A genuine latest spec 105 rear mech is about £50 in the UK. But they last pretty much forever. In fact I've never had to actually replace one in 30+ years. So I don't really see the point in risking a $3 mech on such a ride critical component.
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Old 06-15-21, 03:32 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Some have plain bushes, some have sealed bearings. There are pros and cons to both types but they are rarely a problem. When I was doing a lot of seriously wet and muddy mountain biking I would often strip them down and clean after a big ride, but I don’t touch them on my road bikes.
In more than 30 years of riding as an adult I’ve lubed a couple of squeaky ones once or twice and maybe had one replaced. And I’m notoriously lazy when it comes to routine maintenance/cleaning.

IMO, this another of the OP’s manufactured threads.
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Old 06-16-21, 08:31 AM
  #39  
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I just had to replace the jockey wheels on one of my bikes. It was on a 1972 campy nuovo record derailer. The wheels tend to crack over time. The brass bushings showed no wear… I think the OP is just making things up.
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Old 06-16-21, 12:12 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Flatforkcrown View Post
I just had to replace the jockey wheels on one of my bikes. It was on a 1972 campy nuovo record derailer. The wheels tend to crack over time. The brass bushings showed no wear… I think the OP is just making things up.

My high school gym teacher was named Brass Bushing.
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Old 06-16-21, 02:59 PM
  #41  
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About 35 years of riding. Mountain biking, and now mostly road and some trail riding.

Not once have I ever needed to replace my jockey wheels before I had to replace my derailleur. I do keep my bikes clean, and the derailleur pivots and hinges lubricated.

So stock jockey wheels for me. I am into the whole "muted colors" thing (it goes with the scowl on my face - j/k) also and never got into flashy blingy components either.
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Old 06-16-21, 03:05 PM
  #42  
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Any type with bearing inside , now i'm running those cheap pulleys in ergal but they will not last longer. Next i'll buy a better quality pulleys but always with bearing inside (not ceramic)
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Old 06-16-21, 05:45 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Flatforkcrown View Post
I just had to replace the jockey wheels on one of my bikes. It was on a 1972 campy nuovo record derailer. The wheels tend to crack over time. The brass bushings showed no wear.
Do you think the modern plastic jockey wheels have brass bushings?
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Old 06-16-21, 07:35 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
Do you think the modern plastic jockey wheels have brass bushings?
No your cheap knockoff Tourney derailleur does not have brass bushings, they are going to use cheap plastic on a cheap derailleur that is what they do. Nuovo Record was the top groupset from Campagnolo for a while and had many many victories under its belt. Very high quality and good looks and as you can see can last a pretty long time with an obvious wear part finally giving up the ghost.
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Old 06-16-21, 08:35 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
Do you think the modern plastic jockey wheels have brass bushings?
I’d imagine that the ones worth using have at least that. Cartridge or adjustable bearings would be nice too.
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Old 06-18-21, 08:28 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
Do you think the modern plastic jockey wheels have brass bushings?
Shimano Deore XT derailleurs have a ceramic bushing for the guide pulley and a cartridge bearing for the tension pulley. I think Ultegra has the same.
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Old 06-20-21, 05:32 PM
  #47  
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Size may matter, many say it does, but clearly the more important characteristic is tooth number. To minimize wear, the wheels should each be a separate prime number, and neither should be a factor of the number of links in the chain.
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Old 06-21-21, 05:53 AM
  #48  
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kinda related to the rear der topic; Why would the cage be a two piece clamshell when the wheels are riveted together? Seems the cage could be less of an intricate design & also reduce the material size when the chain is using a quick link. I have no problem fishing the chain thru the cage when it's a connected by such. It might be beneficial to have less material covering those plastic wheels to keep debris from lodging in the tight areas. Are there rear ders with good performance & reliability that I'm not privy of in existence like such?
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Old 06-22-21, 04:12 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
On a related topic - what adverse effect comes from a worn tension pulley? Obviously, a worn guide pulley does negatively affect shifting precision and speed. But I suspect that with the tension pulley, given it spins freely and there is no play in the bearing, there shouldn't be much difference up until it is worn near round.

Am I wrong in thinking this?
One of them on my Prelude was worn enough that the chain kept coming off of it. So there's that. I can't imagine them wearing fast on a newer bike, this is one of the last Chicago Schwinns, it took 30 something years of who knows what kinda riding to wear down. I've seen late 90s- 00s walmart bikes with jockey pulleys still with lots of life in them.
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Old 06-22-21, 04:21 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
I’ve got over 35,000 miles on a Shimano 105 rear derailer, and that has never happened to it’s plastic jockey wheels… Of course, it cost more than two dollars.
My main LBS jokingly tried to sell me a set of carbon ones for twenty bucks. I am still thinking about getting them three years later because of the influence of some of the people on here, even though only the two of us would even know. I don't even think they're lighter than the plastic ones.
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