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I made a Structured Training for 2 Months, Is this Good? (Newbie)

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I made a Structured Training for 2 Months, Is this Good? (Newbie)

Old 05-15-20, 04:30 PM
  #26  
Seattle Forrest
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Originally Posted by kingston View Post
Thanks for the helpful response, but I don't think tracking the performance management metrics is going to work for me. I have a lot of bikes and just one has a powermeter, so I was hoping to get a sense for the amount of weekly training I should target for randonneuring.
I hike, climb, and ski, so I'm in the same boat for other reasons. Heart rate works pretty well for me, for how much exercise to do.
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Old 05-15-20, 07:07 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by kingston View Post
Thanks for the helpful response, but I don't think tracking the performance management metrics is going to work for me. I have a lot of bikes and just one has a powermeter, so I was hoping to get a sense for the amount of weekly training I should target for randonneuring. I've been riding the bike with the powermeter exclusively for the last two weeks since I got the meter, but I don't see myself riding the same bike all the time. It's really useful for indoor workouts and interesting to look at outside, but I probably won't be able to realize the full benefit of performance management because I like riding different bikes. I've been using the free combination of training peaks, strava, trainerday and golden cheetah which all work surprisingly well together.


This pretty much describes my training program in the spring and summer. In the fall and winter it's "spend enough time on the bike so I don't get too fat over the holidays". We're still able to ride outside here in Chicago. Riding a 300k tomorrow. Hope things open up for you soon enough.
I ride different bikes, only one of which has a PM, and hike, ski Alpine and XC, run, and do weight training. I also wear a HRM and have my LTHR set to about equal my effort at FTP on the bike. I record everything I do, on a Garmin on the bikes, and an uploading GPS watch for HR off the bikes. On the bike over an hour or so's ride, hrTSS comes out about the same as TSS, so that works. TrainingPeaks selects TSS if a PM as well as a HRM is used or hrTSS if only HR is uploaded. Running gets expressed as rTSS, but if you click on that, you can change it to hrTSS.

Alpine skiing generates more stress than hrTSS thinks it does because of its nature as a series of intervals. Same with doing intervals with any equipment, hrTSS will come out low. In the gym, the rests between lifts also are recorded, so I think that's not so far off in terms of stress.

In any case, I've been doing this was for years, and find the PMC the most useful training aid I've ever encountered. I follow it religiously, and with good results. When my TSB (Form) has been way negative for a couple days, I'm tired for sure and when I'm positive by 10 or so, I'm raring to go and actually been loafing too much. I plan my weeks to alter my CTL by specific amounts/week. It takes a good bit of experience to see how that works. I suggest just logging everything this season and then refer to that when planning your next season. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised at how useful data can be.

All the above said, it does depend on having instrumentation which will record and upload HR and a chest strap with an appropriate transmitter. I think that's totally worth spending the money on.

The great thing about doing it this way is that once you know what you're doing, you can plan ahead, being able to predict what rides and workouts will yield the results you want when you want them. Takes the guesswork out along with the mistakes, and gives you a better idea of how hard you can push it and not screw up.
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Old 05-15-20, 07:42 PM
  #28  
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Great advice as always. I got an HRM chest strap with the bolt head unit so I have been recording that too for the first time. Sounds like it will take a few months of recording and observations before making any major changes.
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Old 05-15-20, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by kingston View Post
Great advice as always. I got an HRM chest strap with the bolt head unit so I have been recording that too for the first time. Sounds like it will take a few months of recording and observations before making any major changes.
If you do an FTP test, and it's long enough, say the 2 X 20' test, you'll know your LTHR also. Then you can set your zones for both in TP. If the Bolt has zones, I don't think they matter. TP does its own calculations. A useful thing you can do with HR is to set a max HR for a brevet. So like I'd do a 200 - I'd see what the max HR was which I could come up with at the end. That'd be my max for the 300, and so on. It's the high end HR that really zaps you, but you know that already, just don't have the numbers yet. The longer the ride, the lower the max HR necessary to finish with your lowest possible time.
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Old 05-17-20, 10:37 AM
  #30  
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Training Peaks calculated my Threshold Heat Rate and Power based on a hard training ride last week, and the values seem consistent with what I would expect based on the data I see from my other rides. My guess is that I might be able to get a few more beats/watts with a 2x20 FTP test', but nothing significant, so I'll probably put off the FTP test a few more weeks/months. It sounds hard .

On brevets, my weakest link has always been muscle endurance. At the end of a long ride I can still feel great, but my quads will start cramping up, and I have to slow way down. On my two brevets so far with power, the PM has helped me turn down the watts on climbs which I think is saving my legs for later in the ride. I like watching power better than HR for this because I can see it instantly. By the time the HR comes up, I'm at the top of the hill and the damage is done. I imagine a bit of experience watching the power will make it pretty easy to carry over to my other non-PM'd bikes.

I'm also hoping to use the PM for structured workouts to improve muscle endurance which is something I've never done before.
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Old 05-17-20, 08:38 PM
  #31  
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I also used to have this same problem before getting a PM - I tend to overdo it on climbs, and during long brevets my legs are shot and can't push much torque, but can still spin so my climbing suffers significantly even though I still maintain good speed on the flats. The PM helps me dial down those unnecessary efforts and I end up pacing a lot better as a result.

One bike fitter I used to visit pre-lockdown times once said, I'm good at spinning but I also need to work on my low cadence work. In The Sufferfest, they have two workouts for this - Power Station and G.O.A.T, but they are relatively moderate IF and low TSS so I tend to throw one of them in either early during the week when my legs are still fresh or if there is an upcoming event with heavy climbing involved.
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