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Road Bike and Gear Choice Advice.

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Road Bike and Gear Choice Advice.

Old 06-04-21, 10:08 PM
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Epika
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Road Bike and Gear Choice Advice.

Hi. I want to buy a Road bike. But i don't know which gears i must to select. Is there any advice to low price road bikes and gear options?
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Old 06-04-21, 10:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Epika View Post
Hi. I want to buy a Road bike. But i don't know which gears i must to select. Is there any advice to low price road bikes and gear options?
We don't know how much you want to spend or what is even available where you are. Do you have good roads or do you need a bike that can be ridden in dirt sometimes? Do you need to climb hills? If you're not climbing hills any geared bike will work.
If you've never had a road bike you should get a less expensive one to start on. Just make sure it's the right size for your body.
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Old 06-04-21, 10:30 PM
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In my country we don't use dolar so i cant explain how much can i spend for bike. But i can say i want a entry-mid bikes. In our country, we have good and bad roads in same times. But i want to go long ways so i gonna use the good ways. This why im want to buy road bike. But i dont know the gear things. I search some videos and i saw " Gear Rate". I dont even know what it is, and how i can select the true gear rates (btw thx for the help )
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Old 06-05-21, 02:42 AM
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Having a "compact" 50/34 crankset and 11-36 cassette will give you enough coverage for bombing downhills at incredible speed and dealing with very steep climbs.
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Old 06-05-21, 02:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Epika View Post
But i dont know the gear things. I search some videos and i saw " Gear Rate". I dont even know what it is, and how i can select the true gear rates (btw thx for the help )
Gear Ratio
the gear ratio determines how much the rear wheel turns for each turn of the crank. This influences how hard it is to push the pedals. To go uphill you want the rear wheel to make few turns for each turn of the crank. To go fast on the flat you want many turns of the wheel for each turn of the crank.
Humans, like all engines, work best in a certain combination of resistance and rate-of-turn.
It is generally recommended that you pick a gear that lets you turn the pedals 80-100 revolutions/minute.
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Old 06-05-21, 07:28 AM
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Can you post a link to any bikes you are considering? Or can you tell us what brand and model bike you can get there?
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Old 06-05-21, 11:48 AM
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I think something like this could do anything you want.

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribbl...himano-tiagra/
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Old 06-05-21, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Jack Tone View Post
I think something like this could do anything you want.

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribbl...himano-tiagra/
I like it! I wonder if you can get one in Turkey.
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Old 06-05-21, 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Having a "compact" 50/34 crankset and 11-36 cassette will give you enough coverage for bombing downhills at incredible speed and dealing with very steep climbs.
And it'll leave you with big jumps between each gear, which doesn't bother some folks but you might hate it. If you want to stay at your most efficient cadence (RPM), you want close gears that don't spread as wide, if you don't need all that range. I don't do much climbing so it's 53/39 x 12-25 on my bike. If I could get 13-25 in 11s, that'd be on there.
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Old 06-05-21, 10:28 PM
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Specialized Allez Elite is a great entry level road bike with decent components there is a shop in Istanbul that deals with Specialized (and might be more around the country) that would be a reasonable consideration as it is generally a popular one near me and I have sold a bunch of them over the years.
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Old 06-06-21, 12:23 AM
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Not enough information to give any useful advice.
But I would say that you don't normally choose a bike by the gearing it has.
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Old 06-06-21, 12:46 AM
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I saw the link, but i think more like bianchi slr 400. Or close to that. Btw like kimmos said, i dont want climbing too much. Is this gear ok for me? Thanks for all advices. Im gonna ask for price to ribble in our country. What a great community
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Old 06-06-21, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
And it'll leave you with big jumps between each gear, which doesn't bother some folks but you might hate it. If you want to stay at your most efficient cadence (RPM), you want close gears that don't spread as wide, if you don't need all that range. I don't do much climbing so it's 53/39 x 12-25 on my bike. If I could get 13-25 in 11s, that'd be on there.
Some low-high gear cassettes only have big jumps at the lowest gears (36T to 30T). 28T and below is more or less normal jumps and has similar jumps to a 28-11t 9 speed cassette.

Not everyone starts at >11 speed cassette. Most riders I know started with 8 speed cassette. It never bothered them and was totally happy with it......Until they upgraded to >10 speed cassette.
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Old 06-06-21, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Epika View Post
I saw the link, but i think more like bianchi slr 400. Or close to that. Btw like kimmos said, i dont want climbing too much. Is this gear ok for me? Thanks for all advices. Im gonna ask for price to ribble in our country. What a great community
The more you don't like climbing, the more you need lower gears. Climbs will be eaiser and more bearable with lower gears. You cannot avoid climbs totally unless you don't plan doing long rides and only stick to one place where it's almost flat everywhere.
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Old 06-07-21, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Not everyone starts at >11 speed cassette. Most riders I know started with 8 speed cassette. It never bothered them and was totally happy with it......Until they upgraded to >10 speed cassette.
I started with six cogs, and it was a matter of choosing carefully. I chose to go without the rarely used extremes so I'd have the cogs I wanted often.
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Old 06-07-21, 06:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
I started with six cogs, and it was a matter of choosing carefully. I chose to go without the rarely used extremes so I'd have the cogs I wanted often.
Those I knew with 8 speed had 28-11t with compact crankset. Their main complaint was not enough low end gearing for climbs. Many in the group are >50 year olds. Never heard them complain about the jumps of 8 speed. Maybe they have no idea what "jumps" are all about in relation to cadence.
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Old 06-07-21, 07:01 AM
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Everything depends on how many hills are around.
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Old 06-07-21, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Having a "compact" 50/34 crankset and 11-36 cassette will give you enough coverage for bombing downhills at incredible speed and dealing with very steep climbs.
If you live in hilly area or are oldish this is excellent advice. Both apply to me, and my 39/48 cyclocross bike with 11-36 cassette and road tires has given my "road" bike a new life since putting on the 11-36 and a Sora GS RD to replace the original 12-25 cassette. Those 12-25s are for young fellers and flat-landers...
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Old 06-07-21, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Epika View Post
I saw the link, but i think more like bianchi slr 400. Or close to that. Btw like kimmos said, i dont want climbing too much. Is this gear ok for me? Thanks for all advices. Im gonna ask for price to ribble in our country. What a great community
I don't think they sell that model in America so I can't find any information on it. I do think Bianchi makes some nice bikes and if you have a dealer you can trust they can probably help you make the right choice.
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Old 06-11-21, 02:39 AM
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Yes, i get gear means now. Thanks everyone. Like big john's said, i hope the dealer make the right choice for me.
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Old 06-11-21, 02:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Epika View Post
Yes, i get gear means now. Thanks everyone. Like big john's said, i hope the dealer make the right choice for me.
Most bikes come with pretty big gear ranges nowadays (50/34 chain rings, 11-32 cassettes), so if anything, you might want to reduce range if you do happen to end up riding only in relatively flat areas.
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Old 06-17-21, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
And it'll leave you with big jumps between each gear, which doesn't bother some folks but you might hate it. If you want to stay at your most efficient cadence (RPM), you want close gears that don't spread as wide, if you don't need all that range. I don't do much climbing so it's 53/39 x 12-25 on my bike. If I could get 13-25 in 11s, that'd be on there.
This is not gearing that would be recommended for any beginning rider.
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Old 06-17-21, 10:40 PM
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Originally Posted by teejaywhy View Post
This is not gearing that would be recommended for any beginning rider.
I'd say that depends on where they live, and furthermore it wasn't a recommendation so much as making the point that there's a cost many ignore to having unnecessarily wide ratios.
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Old 06-18-21, 02:03 PM
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If the bike you're looking at is the Bianchi SLR 400 on Trendyol, then that's a fine bike to start on. The listing there doesn't say what the crank (gears directly attached to your pedals) gears are, but I would assume 50-34. The cassette is 11-30, which should give you a decent range of gears for flat to mildly hilly. If you live somewhere with steep hills that you'll be riding regularly, I'd change to a wider cassette, like 11-34. But for your typical roads, 11-30 is quite good.

How many KM are you planning on riding per week? Per year? Are you going out in all four seasons, wet/cold and dry/hot? If you plan on riding a lot (say, >2k km/year), you might find some value in looking at bikes equipped with Shimano Sora, rather than Claris. Claris is fine, but Sora will shift a little better and is likely built a little better for heavier use. Of course, that comes at a price.

Just a few things you're going to want to factor in when you get a bike and start riding more than 30-60 minutes at a time:
- Get a saddle bag, and fill it with two tire levers, a tube, a patch kit, and a CO2 canister. If you can't get a CO2 canister, then get a mini pump to mount to your bike
- Learn to repair or replace your tube - you say not all roads are good, glass and rocks can easily cause a puncture. Fixing a flat tire by replacing or patching a tube is a lot more fun than walking 10-20km until you can get a ride
- Also, once you're riding more than 60min regularly, might want to look at cycling shorts or clipless pedals. Not everyone's taste, but they do make longer rides more enjoyable
- If you're looking to save weight on your bike, the first, and most useful upgrade will be the tires. I know nothing about Chaoyang tires, but I doubt they're lightweight or fast rolling. Switching out to a moderately priced folding bead tire such as Continental Ultra Sport Folding or Vittoria Rubino Pros (among others) could save you 0.5 kilo.
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