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Post your Centurion Ironman.. For the love of 80s paint jobs!

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Post your Centurion Ironman.. For the love of 80s paint jobs!

Old 08-30-20, 12:56 PM
  #9051  
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Well done, sir!
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Old 08-30-20, 01:24 PM
  #9052  
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Nasty filthy hoods looking new again. Kinda sticky though, we'll see if that goes away in time.


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Old 08-30-20, 07:57 PM
  #9053  
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Kind of a long day, but the HnHH is behind me (us)



Sort of began yesterday, as we rolled at 7:30 for 48.12 miles and 3,033’, riding between climbs.
A warmup.

I knew I was ready. Always should be a warning. Last night I tested the ‘88 Ironman and all was OK.

Up at 4:30 to type the cue sheets, just the turns, we're grownups, and getting lost is part of the game.. Load the truck. Drive 35 min to the park. The plan: a “three-dog” crazy eight loop on a loop. A gas station near the park where we start, and another 18 miles away. 3x36, then, with a shortcut to limit it to 100 or so. At least that was the plan. I told her I wanted fairly flat.

We arrive early, bathrooms are open! Get the bikes out. Another couple arrives, then two more guys. As they are admiring the Ironman, I turn the bar. It moves; the fork doesn’t quite follow. WTF? We take a look. Modern stem on an Innicycle headset adapter. Stem bolts are tight. Pull one out, aluminum curls coming off. Stem is toast. The last thing she said was “maybe take a spare bike...”

So I say, “you guys take off. I’ll drive back and swap bikes, catch you by going backwards on the first loop.” Off they go. Off I go. I drive straight to my storage unit, sitting on my balls in Spandex, drop off the IM, pick up the ‘85 Colnago. It’s older, heavier, and tired from 210 miles last weekend. So am I. But it’s proven. I drive back to the park and take off.

I try to read the cue sheet backwards. I miss the first turn, and realize it, so I go "out the normal way. I figure at 9.5 miles, I can turn around and catch them at the end of the first loop. I get back at about 20 miles. It’s not flat. Not Not Not. The group is not back, they hit headwinds, so I turn and go back out, correctly, backwards. Easy Peasy, I’ll meet them, right? Not. Road construction cuts a 40-yard swath across their route to me, so they turn around and detour, with their first loop to end at 41 miles. I come to the construction and turn around, too. They ended at 41, with me at 29. At least we're all at the park. After loop 1, I am only down 12 miles, mostly by riding harder than I should. Interesting enough, one guy is out of water, and takes my last bottle. Another comes over and picks up a Gatorade and walks away. One guy says he’s done, so he gets a Yeungling. One gal decides she has other stuff to do, so she leaves her husband with us. The temperature is rising.

We take off for loop 2, but of course we can’t go backwards. So, one guy says “I know the roads.” Always a warning. By the time we get 18 miles to the only gas station,, folks are not agreeing on routes. I fill my lady’s water bottles and mine with ice only, and get a cup out, so we can then mix them. Same guy who picked up the Gatorade decides he needs ice, so I give it to him and go back in to get my stuff. I come back out to “why did you go back in?“. Because 1.Someone else took my Gatorade at the park and 2.The same person sat on his bike here and couldn’t be bothered to go in AND GET HIS OWN STUFF. Whatever, miscommunication and riding is what it's about, so off we go.

During loop 2, I get a texted pic of my truck doors wide open. The lady who had things to so, sh shut them. Thanks!

During loop 2, three of get into the zone, and of course we miss a turn. We realize this a few miles out, turn around, and we hustle back. This helpsme, as now I’m only 9 miles down on the group (which is now two). But the two guys are off “total,” too, with some mileage I'm not sure they wanted. On hills. Did I say it was not flat. Wasn't. Wasn't. Wasn't.

We finish loop 2, we have one guy at 81 and he splits, the same guy who "needed my Gatorade and convenience store ice. Seems he finds a big jug of iced Gatorade at the end, from his car.. Imagine that. No Yuengling for him. My lady is at 81. One guy is at 84 and he’s done, so he gets a Yuengling. He was up for 75, and this one got him.

Now there are 3 of us. My lady needs 19 miles for her hundred, Ben needs16, and I need 26. I'm only 7 down on the "intended route." Ha! Off we go, loop 3. We decide it's out and back to get our mileage, period. My lady finishes at 101, Ben at 104 as he paced with her on the return.

I have to go farther, and yep, I miss the same turn, again. I find not one but two dead end roads, trying to avoid the "Deluge" climb I've now down 3 times. Nope, have to backtrack. I started rationing my final water at 92, sipping at 94,96, and 98, when "alles kaput." Sting's "moment of doubt and pain" comes to mind. I see two riders ahead of me and decide to catch them. I do. They are casual, going about 25 miles. I don't even mention where I'm at on that. I finally roll in, right at 7:00 hours. My folks were there. Good People!
109.8 miles.
6,638’ of climbing.
7:00:46 at 15.7 avg moving time.
I'll take it.

Nice and flat.

Last edited by RobbieTunes; 08-31-20 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 08-30-20, 09:59 PM
  #9054  
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
109.8 miles.
6,638 of climbing.
Nice and flat.
I apparently don't understand nice and flat...

Great work!
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Old 08-30-20, 10:32 PM
  #9055  
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Originally Posted by tgot View Post
i apparently don't understand nice and flat...

Great work!
lol, +1
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Old 08-30-20, 11:58 PM
  #9056  
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Saturday, August 29, was my fifth anniversary of resuming cycling and my fifth failed attempt at meeting an arbitrary distance/time goal in the hottest weather of the year. I'm starting to look forward to achieving these failures. And it never gets any easier. I just go slower. (Greg LeMond lied.)

Each year since then I've attempted a full century and haven't managed to finish one yet. I have done a metric century a couple of times.

I did 48 miles Saturday, a little short of the full century I'd planned. I planned to ride 50 before noon, take a nap (the afternoon temperature was estimated to be 105F), and finish that evening. I figured as long as I finished by midnight it counted.

I had ridden 65 miles Wednesday evening, my last prep ride, and felt great. In fact, I should have done my full century that night. But I wanted to save energy for the official date. Dumb. Next time I'll ignore arbitrary calendar stuff and just ride according to my own body.

First mistake was leaving late, around 9 am, based on my estimated time to finish 50 miles and get home before the hottest part of the day. I didn't allow for complications.

On Saturday, even with months of careful heat conditioning, I still overestimated my ability. I expected the temperature to reach over 100F by 1 pm, but I expected to be home resting by then.

Didn't turn out that way.

According to my bike computer the temperature shot up from the 90s to 126F, then settled down to a comfortable 115F. I suspect my bike computer is reading reflected heat off the pavement, and probably about 10 degrees too high. But the freshly chipsealed and black painted road was like an oven. I can see from the bike computer's thermometer when I was on and off that 8-10 mile segment.

I decided to ride the first 50 miles around a lake to the west, mostly rural roads. I hadn't ridden that route in almost a year but hadn't heard any negative reports from other local cyclists. But the roads were a mess. A long stretch of formerly smooth paved shoulder was now the fresh hell of new chipseal, the worst I've encountered yet. It felt like railroad ballast with a little black spray paint. Making it worse, I'd just swapped from perfectly good 700x25 tires with latex tubes to 700x23 with butyl tubes. The combo felt like the Flintstone's rockmobile tires.


When I reached the farm/ranch road to the lake, the formerly semi-passable asphalt was now a chopped up and neglected mess of chunks of asphalt busted up by road machines, but never finished. Apparently the county commissioner did whatever they could afford to do quickly and just dumped a mishmash of gravel, railroad ballast, pea gravel and sand willy nilly. I was riding the brakes on every downhill, eyes popped out goggling for soft patches of sandy pea gravel that would make the skinny tires plow in.

I was an hour behind schedule when I decided to take a chance on an unfamiliar farm/ranch road that I knew friends had taken before and hadn't mentioned any problems. Fortunately the road was great, no problems.

But the weather changed very suddenly, from partly cloudy and 90s to clear blazing sunlight and hot. I'd felt cold fronts blowing in during autumn and spring changes, but this was the first time I'd experienced a sudden hot front in Texas -- although I'd experienced the Santa Ana winds in Southern California. The temperature suddenly increased 10 degrees, from the mid-90s to mid-100s. My bike computer claimed the temperature peaked at 126F but I'm doubtful. That computer tends to overestimate by 10 degrees, and seems to read heat off the pavement rather than ambient air temperature. But the pavement definitely felt hotter than 110F.

Fortunately I did not underestimate my need for water. I knew there wouldn't be any place to get refills along the route I planned to take. Besides the usual pair of 24 oz bottles (both with electrolytes, one frozen so it's still cold more than an hour later), I added a new hydration pack that held 2 liters of plain water. An O-ring wasn't sealing so there was a slow leak down my back and it actually felt good. It was so slow it didn't drain the bag, just a gradual seeping.

I had two puncture flats in the final 5 miles home, and was down to about 8 ounces of hot water. But it was still water. That was the worst part of the ride. Mostly the psychological element of being so close to home and baking along the roadside.

I got home at 2 pm, two hours behind schedule, and decided to take a nap and cool off, then start again around 6 pm to finish another 50 miles before midnight.

I slept until 11 pm.

I thought about riding Sunday to finish that 50 miles. Nope. Slept until 6 am. Got up, had coffee, stumbled around like a zombie, went back to bed at 8 am, slept until 2 pm.


No more summertime daylight attempts at centuries, or any specific goal other than to just ride my damn bike until it's no longer fun.

Next time I'll go with my natural body clock and ride at night.


Pearson Ranch, highest elevation of the ride. In one hour the temperature shot up from the mid-90s around Lake Weatherford to 115F, per my bike computer. Probably closer to 105F. 30 miles from home, decided to head back when the heat suddenly increased.

First of two flats, less than five miles from home. Hottest part of the ride. And I made the mistake of using Continental Ultra Sport II tires, tough but extremely difficult to remove and remount. Fortunately I carried a pair of heavy duty tire levers and Kool Stop bead jack, but it was a mistake switching from comfy 700x25 Conti GP Classic skinwalls with latex tubes, to the 700x23 Ultra Sport II with butyl tires. Go with what you know.

Managed to stab myself in both legs with the chainring and freewheel on the flat repairs.


Stopped to bleed air pressure from tires after plowing in soft fill dirt in chewed up road. This farm/ranch road was in good shape last time I rode, but that was a year ago.


This highway was smooth pavement only a couple of weeks ago. They'd just resurfaced it earlier this year. No idea why it was freshly chipsealed but it was horrible. I used the right side tire track whenever possible, checking my mirrors constantly.


Second flat repair in final 5 miles home.


Best part of ride, around Lake Weatherford. Was tempted to pull over for a swim.

Turnaround point, 20 miles home.
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Old 08-31-20, 03:41 AM
  #9057  
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A hunerd is a hunerd is a hunerd

Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Saturday, August 29, was my fifth anniversary of resuming cycling and my fifth failed attempt at meeting an arbitrary distance/time goal in the hottest weather of the year. I'm starting to look forward to achieving these failures. And it never gets any easier. I just go slower. (Greg LeMond lied.)

Each year since then I've attempted a full century and haven't managed to finish one yet. I have done a metric century a couple of times.

I did 48 miles Saturday, a little short of the full century I'd planned. I planned to ride 50 before noon, take a nap (the afternoon temperature was estimated to be 105F), and finish that evening. I figured as long as I finished by midnight it counted.

I had ridden 65 miles Wednesday evening, my last prep ride, and felt great. In fact, I should have done my full century that night. But I wanted to save energy for the official date. Dumb. Next time I'll ignore arbitrary calendar stuff and just ride according to my own body.

First mistake was leaving late, around 9 am, based on my estimated time to finish 50 miles and get home before the hottest part of the day. I didn't allow for complications.

On Saturday, even with months of careful heat conditioning, I still overestimated my ability. I expected the temperature to reach over 100F by 1 pm, but I expected to be home resting by then.

Didn't turn out that way.

According to my bike computer the temperature shot up from the 90s to 126F, then settled down to a comfortable 115F. I suspect my bike computer is reading reflected heat off the pavement, and probably about 10 degrees too high. But the freshly chipsealed and black painted road was like an oven. I can see from the bike computer's thermometer when I was on and off that 8-10 mile segment.

I decided to ride the first 50 miles around a lake to the west, mostly rural roads. I hadn't ridden that route in almost a year but hadn't heard any negative reports from other local cyclists. But the roads were a mess. A long stretch of formerly smooth paved shoulder was now the fresh hell of new chipseal, the worst I've encountered yet. It felt like railroad ballast with a little black spray paint. Making it worse, I'd just swapped from perfectly good 700x25 tires with latex tubes to 700x23 with butyl tubes. The combo felt like the Flintstone's rockmobile tires.


When I reached the farm/ranch road to the lake, the formerly semi-passable asphalt was now a chopped up and neglected mess of chunks of asphalt busted up by road machines, but never finished. Apparently the county commissioner did whatever they could afford to do quickly and just dumped a mishmash of gravel, railroad ballast, pea gravel and sand willy nilly. I was riding the brakes on every downhill, eyes popped out goggling for soft patches of sandy pea gravel that would make the skinny tires plow in.

I was an hour behind schedule when I decided to take a chance on an unfamiliar farm/ranch road that I knew friends had taken before and hadn't mentioned any problems. Fortunately the road was great, no problems.

But the weather changed very suddenly, from partly cloudy and 90s to clear blazing sunlight and hot. I'd felt cold fronts blowing in during autumn and spring changes, but this was the first time I'd experienced a sudden hot front in Texas -- although I'd experienced the Santa Ana winds in Southern California. The temperature suddenly increased 10 degrees, from the mid-90s to mid-100s. My bike computer claimed the temperature peaked at 126F but I'm doubtful. That computer tends to overestimate by 10 degrees, and seems to read heat off the pavement rather than ambient air temperature. But the pavement definitely felt hotter than 110F.

Fortunately I did not underestimate my need for water. I knew there wouldn't be any place to get refills along the route I planned to take. Besides the usual pair of 24 oz bottles (both with electrolytes, one frozen so it's still cold more than an hour later), I added a new hydration pack that held 2 liters of plain water. An O-ring wasn't sealing so there was a slow leak down my back and it actually felt good. It was so slow it didn't drain the bag, just a gradual seeping.

I had two puncture flats in the final 5 miles home, and was down to about 8 ounces of hot water. But it was still water. That was the worst part of the ride. Mostly the psychological element of being so close to home and baking along the roadside.

I got home at 2 pm, two hours behind schedule, and decided to take a nap and cool off, then start again around 6 pm to finish another 50 miles before midnight.

I slept until 11 pm.

I thought about riding Sunday to finish that 50 miles. Nope. Slept until 6 am. Got up, had coffee, stumbled around like a zombie, went back to bed at 8 am, slept until 2 pm.


No more summertime daylight attempts at centuries, or any specific goal other than to just ride my damn bike until it's no longer fun.

Next time I'll go with my natural body clock and ride at night.


Pearson Ranch, highest elevation of the ride. In one hour the temperature shot up from the mid-90s around Lake Weatherford to 115F, per my bike computer. Probably closer to 105F. 30 miles from home, decided to head back when the heat suddenly increased.

First of two flats, less than five miles from home. Hottest part of the ride. And I made the mistake of using Continental Ultra Sport II tires, tough but extremely difficult to remove and remount. Fortunately I carried a pair of heavy duty tire levers and Kool Stop bead jack, but it was a mistake switching from comfy 700x25 Conti GP Classic skinwalls with latex tubes, to the 700x23 Ultra Sport II with butyl tires. Go with what you know.

Managed to stab myself in both legs with the chainring and freewheel on the flat repairs.


Stopped to bleed air pressure from tires after plowing in soft fill dirt in chewed up road. This farm/ranch road was in good shape last time I rode, but that was a year ago.


This highway was smooth pavement only a couple of weeks ago. They'd just resurfaced it earlier this year. No idea why it was freshly chipsealed but it was horrible. I used the right side tire track whenever possible, checking my mirrors constantly.


Second flat repair in final 5 miles home.


Best part of ride, around Lake Weatherford. Was tempted to pull over for a swim.

Turnaround point, 20 miles home.
Your Epic ride brought back haunted hunerd memories for me...I actually had to get a Cold bottle of water to down after reading your post.
You did it! 100 miles or 100 is all the same to me.
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Old 08-31-20, 04:25 AM
  #9058  
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Originally Posted by texaspandj View Post
Your Epic ride brought back haunted hunerd memories for me...I actually had to get a Cold bottle of water to down after reading your post.
You did it! 100 miles or 100 is all the same to me.
+1 Yep.

Suffering strikes when it wants.
Sneaks up and bangs us on the butt.

Good on you, as you adapt and overcome, over and over.
Iron-ass dude right there. BravoZulu

There's a word for this kind of fun.

Last edited by RobbieTunes; 09-01-20 at 06:21 AM.
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Old 08-31-20, 11:41 AM
  #9059  
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
After loop 2, we have one guy at 81 and he splits. Same guy who took the Gatorade and convenient ice. Seems he finds a big jug of iced Gatorade at the end, from his car..
That guy is going to talk to the other guys and gals who rode, and wonder "Why didn't I get a Yuengling?"
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Old 08-31-20, 01:59 PM
  #9060  
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Originally Posted by tgot View Post
I apparently don't understand nice and flat...

Great work!
Thanks. I think I was bamboozled!

Last edited by RobbieTunes; 08-31-20 at 02:02 PM.
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Old 08-31-20, 02:00 PM
  #9061  
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Originally Posted by texaspandj View Post
I did my 26 mile route on my '86 Ironman. Then another on my '87 Ironman, then another on my '88 Ironman, then 20 miles on my '89 Ironman and finally 2 miles on my Diamond Back Apex, Total 100 Miles!
I haven't worked out in anyway for Two weeks. But I felt confident heading out on my first 26 because I knew I was going to really take it slow. And so I resisted picking up the pace when I noticed a cyclist creeping up behind me. We talked a little before he made his turn and it turns out he had owned a MV Ironman and said he wishes he still had it, all this while riding a Carbon with Shimano wireless.
Second 26 miler I picked it up a little because I felt ok.
The third 26 miler I ran out of two bottles of water/energy drink. My wife called at that precise time and then brought me what I needed.
Then a 20 mile route my wife rode with me just for support. She's a trooper. About a 1.5 miles from turn around I got a cramp in my left hamstring (first time in my life) once it subsided we were back at it.
I was still 2 miles short of a 100 so I hopped on my newly acquired diamond back Apex and did my 1 mile course...twice.

2nd 26 miles, 86 Easy lemon squeezy.

1st 26 miles 81 Easy peasy.

3rd 26 miles, 100 and wind, not so easy.

@Robbietunes

Last 20 miles, 104, not really FUN at all...and More wind.

Pics
You da man, though. Iron. Man.
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Old 08-31-20, 03:00 PM
  #9062  
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You people are all tough ----------! (every word I put in there doesn't seem appropriate)

Last edited by seypat; 08-31-20 at 03:03 PM.
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Old 08-31-20, 03:16 PM
  #9063  
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Originally Posted by seypat View Post
You people are all tough ----------! (every word I put in there doesn't seem appropriate)
I can thnk of several words. They're all spelled asterisk, asterisk, asterisk......
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Old 09-03-20, 08:43 PM
  #9064  
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I've ridden my Diamond Back Apex 3 days in a row until the rain came and spoiled the party.
I had posted how I planned to get a WM bike after repairing then test riding them..they took me back to being 11 years old and riding my Kmart specials and having fun. But instead I talked my riding buddy into us buying mountain bikes and I gave up on the WallMrt bike.
Bottom line I haven't been on my Ironman and my buddy can't ride this weekend. Maybe next week.. maybe next week.
We have national class trails in our Cameron Park. Currently I only ride on the multi path portion called the river trail. It's relatively short and as I head to the turnaround the river is on my right meanwhile the left is where the serious trail rider veins are. It's relatively safe til the last quarter mile then it gets tricky. I have a good engine but my mountain bike handling skills are suspect. Doesn't help that this particular model isn't really a good bike for trails but perfect for having fun.
Keep the rubber side down Ironkids...I'm trying to do the same.
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Old 09-03-20, 09:00 PM
  #9065  
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Ok IM experts a question. This thread has peaked my interest over the years in picking up an IM, however I just completed refurbing a 89 Specialized Allez and they appear (no blasphemy intended) at a glance to be similar (duck)...? any IM folks own both and can tell me the differences in broad strokes.....?

Inquisitive in Seattle

(Side note as an apartment dweller my room for vintage bikes is unfortunately finite and I am at 5 currently )
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Old 09-04-20, 12:23 AM
  #9066  
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Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
Ok IM experts a question. This thread has peaked my interest over the years in picking up an IM, however I just completed refurbing a 89 Specialized Allez and they appear (no blasphemy intended) at a glance to be similar (duck)...? any IM folks own both and can tell me the differences in broad strokes.....?

Inquisitive in Seattle

(Side note as an apartment dweller my room for vintage bikes is unfortunately finite and I am at 5 currently )
Sell your Trek 520 and get an Ironman. I recently picked up an abused 86 Allez SE and will soon know more how they compare. My SE has shorter chainstays and maybe steeper angles.
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Old 09-04-20, 12:58 AM
  #9067  
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Funny just sold the Trek 520 today but that was to reduce the herd not keep it the same. Hmmm
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Old 09-04-20, 07:06 AM
  #9068  
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Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
Ok IM experts a question. This thread has peaked my interest over the years in picking up an IM, however I just completed refurbing a 89 Specialized Allez and they appear (no blasphemy intended) at a glance to be similar (duck)...? any IM folks own both and can tell me the differences in broad strokes.....?

Inquisitive in Seattle

(Side note as an apartment dweller my room for vintage bikes is unfortunately finite and I am at 5 currently )
I would think similar with the allez having quicker handling than the Ironman. However I'm only guessing as I have no anecdotal evidence.
You could look up the differences in geometry and flesliders vintage-centurion.com website would have the catalog with geometry listed.
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Old 09-05-20, 01:11 PM
  #9069  
rosefarts
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Is a project bike really ever finished?

Here it is.



I'm not sure yet if I love the Celeste bar tape or hate it. Those tiny handlebars meant that a bottom up wrap would look funny with finishing tape up top, so I went top down. We'll see how it holds up.

The white hoods are sticky and I can't seem to unsticky them, black hoods are very affordable and will be showing up on Tuesday.

The rear wheel is off my Spectrum, the 14-28 freewheel I'm planning to use will also be showing up on Tuesday.

I've got one of those water bottle cages that looks like a bird on it's way also.

Nobody should love big anodized green CNC pedals on this bike. I might be able to talk my wife into SPD but probably not. Maybe just pedals like pictured in silver.

It rides great and shifts perfectly. I think it's got lighter action than my DA 7400 stuff. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing. The brake levers or possibly brakes (single vs double pivot) are way better than my old 7400's. With the new pads, completely comparable to any modern dual pivots caliper.

The seat is a Ritchey Vector from the bin. It'll stay on long enough to see if she likes the bike or if it's going back up for sale. Assuming she loves it, we'll probably shop for a Terry or similar ladies design, bonus points for white.
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Old 09-05-20, 01:20 PM
  #9070  
canklecat
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I just returned my Ironman back to the original Suntour GPX setup. For a couple of weeks I experimented with a Shimano 600 Tricolor RD (which I didn't realize until recently was an 8-speed) and Shimano L422 Light Action downtube friction shifters (nominally 6-speed, but easily cover 7 speeds and will probably pull enough cable for 8-speed).

It was an interesting experiment. Mostly I was curious about the sorta-retrofriction design of the L422 shifters. From looking at diagrams of various retrofriction shifters this particular Shimano does appear to be a genuine retrofriction design, but I might be missing some nuance that differentiates it from the Simplex.

The right side RD lever worked much better than the Suntour GPX lever in friction mode. I had to tighten up the L422 lever retaining/friction bolt several times, just guessing at the appropriate tension while retaining smooth shifting. But once I got it dialed in it was smooth. The GPX is a great index shifter but miserable for friction -- it relies solely on brute force of the combination of metal and plastic washers. In order to prevent ghost shifting when I stand to pedal I had to crank down the tension until shifting felt like shoveling cold mud.

The left side/FD GPX lever (friction only already) ain't bad, very similar to the L422. Both demand some experimenting with bolt tension to prevent ghost shifting without messing up the smooth shifting feel. It has micro-click detents and spring resistance, just like Shimano and others. I could't feel any difference between the Shimano's all metal construction and the Suntour's mix of metal and plastic bits and washers.

Regarding rear derailleurs, the Suntour GPX and Shimano 600 Tricolor are remarkably similar. Everything is pretty much the same, from size and weight to articulation. The only difference I could discern was mostly due to differences in pulleys.

A couple of years ago I complained -- a lot -- about excessive drivetrain friction in the Suntour GPX group, which I finally traced down to the cheap, plain sintered bearing/bushings. Switching to inexpensive but good Tacx delrin sealed bearing pulleys made a big difference in drivetrain smoothness (and conserved my energy, which dwindles with age, so every Watt counts).

The original Shimano 600 Tricolor (early Ultegra) had a very smooth running Centeron sealed bearing pulley. But I went ahead and changed it to the same Tacx pulleys for a fair comparison.

However the Tacx pulleys seem to be a better fit with the Shimano RD. I had to reverse the setup for the Suntour GPX RD, putting the upper pulley on the bottom and vice versa.

Both seem to run comparably smoothly, although the Shimano 600 Tricolor RD ran more quietly with the same pulleys. I suspect that's the difference in swapping the upper/lower pulleys.

The friction setup was a bit quieter overall, mostly because it's possible to trim the derailleurs easily and dial out any slight chain noise. With index shifting there's often one or two gear combos that clatter very slightly no matter how carefully the drivetrain is adjusted.

I might experiment a bit more with the Ironman components. Or maybe I'll use another bike to try various derailleurs, etc. Overall I like the looks of the GPX components. The derailleurs, brakes, etc., look pretty sleek and the blue-gray finish goes well with the blue/white Ironman.
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Old 09-05-20, 05:42 PM
  #9071  
RobbieTunes
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Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
Ok IM experts a question. This thread has peaked my interest over the years in picking up an IM, however I just completed refurbing a 89 Specialized Allez and they appear (no blasphemy intended) at a glance to be similar (duck)...? any IM folks own both and can tell me the differences in broad strokes.....?

Inquisitive in Seattle

(Side note as an apartment dweller my room for vintage bikes is unfortunately finite and I am at 5 currently )
For <40 miles, that Allez SE, which is more like a crit handler, will feel more agile, and if you pay attention you will be fine.
For >40 miles, the Ironman will be a bit more stable if you tire and a bit easier to maintain your place and relax your attention.
Once you get into the 80’s of mileage, the Ironman is a bit easier to be consistent on. At 100, you realize why you like it.

My opinion only.
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Old 09-05-20, 06:22 PM
  #9072  
ryansu 
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Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1987 Trek 520 Cirrus, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, 1989 Specialized Allez Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 1986 Schwinn Passage

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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
For <40 miles, that Allez SE, which is more like a crit handler, will feel more agile, and if you pay attention you will be fine.
For >40 miles, the Ironman will be a bit more stable if you tire and a bit easier to maintain your place and relax your attention.
Once you get into the 80s of mileage, the Ironman is a bit easier to be consistent on. At 100, you realize why you like it.

My opinion only.
Thanks for the input -that is what I was looking for
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Old 09-06-20, 04:20 PM
  #9073  
Chinghis
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Bikes: Historical: Schwinn Speedster; Schwinn Collegiate; 1981 Ross Gran Tour; 1981 Dawes Atlantis; 1991 Specialized Rockhopper. Current: 1987 Ritchey Ultra; 1987 Centurion Ironman Dave Scott Master; 1992 Specialized Stumpjumper FS

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Hey, folks. I've joined your club!

An old co-worker friend of mine dropped me a line this week, and mentioned that he still had the bike he has been wanting to give me for a while. So we got together, and I am now the proud owner of a 1987 Centurion Iron Man Dave Scott Expert. (Do I have all that in the correct order?)

She's a true garage queen. He bought it back in the day to ride and get in shape, etc., but the gearing was too tall for him. Said he had a cassette somewhere that he had always meant to put on, but he couldn't find it.

So I brought her home, wiped her down, lubed the chain, pumped up the tires ... and she rides beautifully. Tires held air, rims are true, everything works like it just rolled out of the LBS.

What's wrong? Oh, the bike computer doesn't display even with a new battery ... need to re-wrap the bars. New brake pads, tubes and tires wouldn't hurt, but other than that she's ready to go. (Don't worry, I'm not gonna go out for a 40-mile ride on the original tires and tubes! Just went for a slow spin around the block.)

I own him one fine barbecue some day.

In any case, here she is in all her glory.

105 components are beautiful.

Condition out of the garage. Never been crashed, I'd wager.

Matching seat bag!

Nitto stem and vintage Cat-Eye.

Quality seat tube.

Holy cow, that cover comes off!

BB Serial Number N6P6754. Database anywhere?

Wait ... there's a friction option?! Sweet!

Miami Vice with a black accent.

She cleans up real pur'dy!

Last edited by Chinghis; 09-06-20 at 04:24 PM. Reason: spelling!
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Old 09-06-20, 04:28 PM
  #9074  
texaspandj
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Bikes: '85, '86 , '87 , '88 , '89 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman.

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Nice looking Miami Vice, such vibrant colors. Congratulations and welcome.
Gorgeous and stunningly beautiful really. Everytime I look at it new words come to mind.
Inspiring me to wax my MV.

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Old 09-06-20, 04:29 PM
  #9075  
RobbieTunes
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Ace bike. Just great.
Welcome to the Empire.

Last edited by RobbieTunes; 09-07-20 at 09:02 AM.
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