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Upgrading 2012 road bike vs. buying new

Old 06-13-22, 10:23 AM
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goldfilm
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Upgrading 2012 road bike vs. buying new

I own a 2012 Fuji Roubaix 1.0. I did a tune up in 2017. A new tune up is way overdue, but I’m considering an upgrade instead. Questions:

1. Would a new bike with carbon frame reduce weight noticeably? (Budget on low end ~ 2K)

​​​​​2. What are the benefits of getting a new alloy bike with upgrades (i.e. Ultegra + hydraulic brakes) vs. keeping mine and upgrade components. Is it worth the extra cost?

3. If I sell my used one, should I tune up/spend money on it, or simply clean it and put it on sale?

4. Considering a current back injury and still wanting a light/fast bike, is there any upgrade or feature to consider that would improve impact absorption?

Thanks!
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Old 06-13-22, 10:36 AM
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A new bike will probably get you wider tire clearance meaning more comfort which is a good thing. Low end carbon vs. nicer groupset I would probably go nicer groupset but me personally I wouldn't really be considering aluminum or carbon anyway.

I would make sure your old bike is in good order and having a receipt saying it was recently tuned can help bring a little more to the table. A bike should be tuned up at least once a year or at the very very very least looked over by someone who knows what they are doing. Leaving it like that for so long isn't good care and maintenance and not a habit you should get into.

The most important upgrade is getting a fit and I would recommend that to anyone back pain or not but especially if back pain. Do that and then you can get your new bike or keep your old bike and upgrade it because you will have some knowledge and your fitter can help steer you in the right direction for comfort.
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Old 06-13-22, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
A new bike will probably get you wider tire clearance meaning more comfort which is a good thing. Low end carbon vs. nicer groupset I would probably go nicer groupset but me personally I wouldn't really be considering aluminum or carbon anyway.

I would make sure your old bike is in good order and having a receipt saying it was recently tuned can help bring a little more to the table. A bike should be tuned up at least once a year or at the very very very least looked over by someone who knows what they are doing. Leaving it like that for so long isn't good care and maintenance and not a habit you should get into.

The most important upgrade is getting a fit and I would recommend that to anyone back pain or not but especially if back pain. Do that and then you can get your new bike or keep your old bike and upgrade it because you will have some knowledge and your fitter can help steer you in the right direction for comfort.
Thanks, agree I was terrible with the maintenance. For years I’ve been only using it once a week for a 10-min commute, so I thought it wasn’t a big deal to tune it up, though actually a few extra times I had tires and brakes replaced.

What do you mean by “I wouldn’t be considering aluminum or carbon…”?
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Old 06-13-22, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by goldfilm View Post
Thanks, agree I was terrible with the maintenance. For years I’ve been only using it once a week for a 10-min commute, so I thought it wasn’t a big deal to tune it up, though actually a few extra times I had tires and brakes replaced.
What do you mean by “I wouldn’t be considering aluminum or carbon…”?
At least you did something to it but yeah keep the maintenance regular. If you have to pause for a while to wonder when you last tuned the bike up it is long past time or you are having memory issues and should see a doctor.

I mean I prefer the nice ride of steel or titanium that is why I personally wouldn't consider aluminum or carbon.
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Old 06-13-22, 12:22 PM
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I’m not sure light, fast, carbon, upgraded components, impact absorption, and $2k play well together.

My wife has a similar, Performance branded, bike to yours. It is fine, except the wheels on hers were exceedingly heavy. The bike came with 23mm wide tires. The biggest issue is the frame “might” fit 28mm to 30mm. The bike has 25’s on it right now.

If your back is having issues with absorbing the road imperfections, you will probably want to run 35mm or 38mm at a little lower pressure.

The other part is geometry. A slightly slacker geometry can help with some road chatter, but sometimes at the expense of quick handling. But there are too many factors to generalize exacting how one bike performs compared to another.

You can try to test out the largest tire on your current bike and see if there is enough ride improvement. If not, move on.

John
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Old 06-13-22, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by goldfilm View Post
I own a 2012 Fuji Roubaix 1.0. I did a tune up in 2017. A new tune up is way overdue, but I’m considering an upgrade instead. Questions:

1. Would a new bike with carbon frame reduce weight noticeably? (Budget on low end ~ 2K)

​​​​​2. What are the benefits of getting a new alloy bike with upgrades (i.e. Ultegra + hydraulic brakes) vs. keeping mine and upgrade components. Is it worth the extra cost?

3. If I sell my used one, should I tune up/spend money on it, or simply clean it and put it on sale?

4. Considering a current back injury and still wanting a light/fast bike, is there any upgrade or feature to consider that would improve impact absorption?

Thanks!
You're going to get all manner of responses to this, so I'll only worry about giving my $0.05 opinion. Blame inflation that it isn't just two cents.

-I think anything "brand new" at that price point, alloy or carbon, is likely lighter than the 2007 aged bike.

-Upgrading will likely get you more gears, a nicer groupset, and maybe even disc brakes and tubeless ready wheels/tires.

-Carbon will be lighter in general. It is actually something that CAN improve ride quality for your concern about impact absorption. They can layup the carbon or introduce things like frame or fork decouplers that improve that (Trek Isospeed is an example).

IMO, if I had to get a "brand new" alloy bike or a "kinda used" carbon bike for $2000 I'd go for the "kinda used". Only issue may be the model years nicer bikes used in that price range having disc brakes or not. If you're making this change, I'd go ahead and get a bike with disc brakes.
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Old 06-14-22, 06:20 AM
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Look into the Fuji Sportif for a more relaxed bike
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Old 06-14-22, 06:57 AM
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I used to try and upgrade the parts on a bike, then usually gave up and bought a nicer bike after wasting a lot of money.

You can presumably get something like $500 back on yours. I'd just clean it up, service it and leave it as is assuming everything works. You won't get your money back on any upgrades.

Your $2k would get you a Giant Content AR 1 - https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/contend-ar-1-2022
That's an alu frame, carbon fork, hydraulic disc brakes, 2x11 gears, D-Fuse seatpost and 32mm tubeless tires.
So that should be lighter, faster, more comfortable and will stop better in all weathers.

I'm not sure you could get anything comparable to the Content AR 1 for your $1500 difference, even if you ignore that everything original on your existing bike will be 10 years older.
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Old 06-14-22, 07:14 AM
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I agree with Herzlos , just clean the bike up and sell it. If that's what you want to do...

Before you sell your current bike, though, you might want to shop around and see what's currently available. There's plenty of horror stories of people putting money down last fall to buy a bike this spring, that haven't been delivered yet. That leaves you with looking at what's in stock near you to try one or a few bikes out, or drooling over web pages for weeks to -- well, to see how well the creative writing geniuses have been recruited into writing web pages. Lighter, stiffer but vertically compliant; all the standard buzzwords rearranged into something that may or may not have any link to reality.

Can you still ride your current bike? If so, pump the tires up and go ride it. Being on the bike is going to be much more satisfying than staring at a screen.
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Old 06-14-22, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Herzlos View Post
I used to try and upgrade the parts on a bike, then usually gave up and bought a nicer bike after wasting a lot of money.

You can presumably get something like $500 back on yours. I'd just clean it up, service it and leave it as is assuming everything works. You won't get your money back on any upgrades.

Your $2k would get you a Giant Content AR 1 - https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/contend-ar-1-2022
That's an alu frame, carbon fork, hydraulic disc brakes, 2x11 gears, D-Fuse seatpost and 32mm tubeless tires.
So that should be lighter, faster, more comfortable and will stop better in all weathers.

I'm not sure you could get anything comparable to the Content AR 1 for your $1500 difference, even if you ignore that everything original on your existing bike will be 10 years older.
What do you mean with “clean it and service it”… full tune up, or just making sure everything works? I’m still riding it with no issues… I ask this because last service was ~ $200. Also is there any basic change like cables or handle tape you’d do before selling or mostly cleaning it is enough?

Also, I’m curious about what feature you’d consider with additional $500-1K to my original budget. Ultegra set, carbon frame, another brand beyond Giant, or anything else?
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Old 06-14-22, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by goldfilm View Post
What do you mean with “clean it and service it”… full tune up, or just making sure everything works? I’m still riding it with no issues… I ask this because last service was ~ $200. Also is there any basic change like cables or handle tape you’d do before selling or mostly cleaning it is enough?
If nothings broken then don't replace anything. Just give it a good wash, oil the parts that need oiled, and make sure everything else is suitably adjusted. You're selling a 10 year old bike, so no-one expecting it to be perfect, just make sure it's safe and usable.

Also, I’m curious about what feature you’d consider with additional $500-1K to my original budget. Ultegra set, carbon frame, another brand beyond Giant, or anything else?
I've no idea, personally. Higher end group sets are lighter and shift a bit smoother but I'm certainly not a good enough cyclist to notice. 105 seems to be regarded as the best value groupset though. Carbon frames will give you a slightly softer ride since there's a bit of flex there.
Most other bike manufacturers will provide something that's more or less equivalent to that Giant model, I only used it because I could look up the prices in USD and I've got a Giant. The only benefit with a Giant bike is the D-Fuse seatpost, which is shaped to allow a bit more flex, and there's often some additional flex in the handlebars as well. Of course that goes both ways, because a D shaped seatpost isn't compatible with other posts.

As mentioned above, availability is also a big deal; the supply chain was pretty broken for a while so you're probably best just settling for what's actually in stock near you and is a good fit.
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Old 06-14-22, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by goldfilm View Post
What do you mean with “clean it and service it”… full tune up, or just making sure everything works? I’m still riding it with no issues… I ask this because last service was ~ $200. Also is there any basic change like cables or handle tape you’d do before selling or mostly cleaning it is enough?

Also, I’m curious about what feature you’d consider with additional $500-1K to my original budget. Ultegra set, carbon frame, another brand beyond Giant, or anything else?
If you do swap tape, which is a good thing, take some good pictures underneath the bars after you take off the old tape (and maybe clean things up) that way people know what is going on underneath that old tape which is in the end a safety issue. Sweat soaks into the tape and sits on your bars and is corrosive. It is especially bad on bikes used on trainers but if it hasn't been changed in a while it can still happen. I don't care if tape looks dirty or whatever on the outside it is underneath that concerns me and should concern everyone to some degree. Not to panic about it but to change out your tape once and a while and when you do that you can also swap to new cables and housing and take care of your bike more often.


I would look beyond Giant or Fuji personally but in the end find something that fits you and works for you. Don't focus on price, focus on fit and function first and then once you have figured that out you can work on price. An ill fitting or ill performing bike is a bad deal no matter how your budget did. Obviously don't go broke or cause financial hardships but don't make it the biggest focus as then it can become the only focus and you get so narrow you lose sight of everything.

In terms of more important, shifting and braking would be my more important get what you want there as upgrading that can get expensive. However if I was buying a complete bike I want a good complete package that fits and works well for me as I said above.
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Old 06-14-22, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
If you do swap tape, which is a good thing, take some good pictures underneath the bars after you take off the old tape (and maybe clean things up) that way people know what is going on underneath that old tape which is in the end a safety issue. Sweat soaks into the tape and sits on your bars and is corrosive. It is especially bad on bikes used on trainers but if it hasn't been changed in a while it can still happen. I don't care if tape looks dirty or whatever on the outside it is underneath that concerns me and should concern everyone to some degree. Not to panic about it but to change out your tape once and a while and when you do that you can also swap to new cables and housing and take care of your bike more often.


I would look beyond Giant or Fuji personally but in the end find something that fits you and works for you. Don't focus on price, focus on fit and function first and then once you have figured that out you can work on price. An ill fitting or ill performing bike is a bad deal no matter how your budget did. Obviously don't go broke or cause financial hardships but don't make it the biggest focus as then it can become the only focus and you get so narrow you lose sight of everything.

In terms of more important, shifting and braking would be my more important get what you want there as upgrading that can get expensive. However if I was buying a complete bike I want a good complete package that fits and works well for me as I said above.
Thanks for the tips. I’ve never did a professional fitting and I think I’ll put it in the budget — a Retul fit is ~ $200 where I live.
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Old 06-14-22, 10:23 AM
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Considering the small amount of time you spend riding, why are you considering upgrading? If what you have is functional, find out how large a tire you can fit on it and the ride will definitely improve. Disk brakes are good, but they also make some really grippy caliper pads today that will impress you. Clean it up, lube it up, throw on some larger tires and better brake pads and enjoy. Spend that cha-ching in your pocket on .......
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Old 06-14-22, 11:29 AM
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A "tune up" has no standard definition. I really don't like the term.

For checking a bike:
Bearings status, shifting quality, cracks inspect, consumables.
Check for chain wear with a ruler or a chain checker. Replace if needed.
Check bottom bracket for rough bearings -- chain off the bike, spin the cranks at the minimum, or better: pull the cranks and turn the bearings with a finger.
Check the rims for spoke hole cracks. hold the axle, spin the wheels for a quick bearing check.
Inspect the frame carefully for cracks.
I'd want a new rear shift cable, at least, perhaps the front one too. Cable housing if it's pretty old -- that's more work than just replacing the inner wire.
Check and adjust the front and rear derailleur operation.
new caliper brake pads if needed, or at least realign them.
Check the headset for worn bearings.
True the wheels if there's pulsing when doing harder braking.
I probably forgot a few things.
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Old 06-14-22, 11:36 AM
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What new bikes have:

Larger tires!
This, by far, is the key to a more comfortable ride on rough roads.
The thin, supple tires, at the appropriate pressures, will smooth out the ride way more than a carbon, high end steel, or Ti frame.
Carbon seatposts or handlebars -- not worth it, usually.

If you ride in the right side tire track on a road, it mostly stays clean of sharp debris -- car tires kick it aside. Riding the shoulder, you need more puncture resistant tires, which won't ride as nicely.

A 2012 frame is very unlikely to fit 28mm tires, and even 25mm might barely fit. It depends on the frame design.

Lower gearing!
Way lower gearing is common now. That's so nice on a hilly ride, even for stronger riders.
It might be difficult to fit very low gears on the older bike. And more cogs help with allowing a wider range of gearing to be practical.

Better fitting
A lot of older bikes seem to be not quite correct for the rider that owns them. Fitting was often very casual then.
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Old 06-14-22, 11:58 AM
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If you'll continue your "10 minute commute a few times a week" habits(with current back issues), and not much more, then I'd buy a used, higher-end(lightweight) 1990s hardtail or rigid fork mountain bike and mount some cushy 2 inch street tires on it an be done.

This thread might be useful:
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...nversions.html
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Old 06-14-22, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by fishboat View Post
If you'll continue your "10 minute commute a few times a week" habits(with current back issues), and not much more, then I'd buy a used, higher-end(lightweight) 1990s hardtail or rigid fork mountain bike and mount some cushy 2 inch street tires on it an be done.

This thread might be useful:
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...nversions.html
I’m recovering from a back injury, and the reason I want to upgrade the bike is because I’m using it much more than before, and cycling is more recommended than running with back issues (generally speaking). So I’m currently intending ~ 1 hour rides a few times a week in a bike path. But to reach there I have a short commute with more city bumps.
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Old 06-14-22, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by goldfilm View Post
What do you mean with “clean it and service it”… full tune up, or just making sure everything works? I’m still riding it with no issues… I ask this because last service was ~ $200. Also is there any basic change like cables or handle tape you’d do before selling or mostly cleaning it is enough?

Also, I’m curious about what feature you’d consider with additional $500-1K to my original budget. Ultegra set, carbon frame, another brand beyond Giant, or anything else?
A $150-200 professional service is never going to get recovered in a sale of a used bike. Wash, wax, clean/lube chain, make sure everything works, shifts, stops, wheels true. Replace cables and brake pads if needed. Let them replace bar tape - might not like your choice.
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Old 06-14-22, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by goldfilm View Post
I’m recovering from a back injury, and the reason I want to upgrade the bike is because I’m using it much more than before, and cycling is more recommended than running with back issues (generally speaking). So I’m currently intending ~ 1 hour rides a few times a week in a bike path. But to reach there I have a short commute with more city bumps.
Specialized Roubaix or Diverge is the one you seek
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Old 06-14-22, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by goldfilm View Post
Thanks for the tips. I’ve never did a professional fitting and I think I’ll put it in the budget — a Retul fit is ~ $200 where I live.
It is a game changer. I also did a Retül fit and can't be happier. They really made some good suggestions and changes that really did honestly work.

$200 is around the average I think. The one we had was a bit north of that but still reasonable for what I did for me. I did one with a friend of mine and it was a static fit and honestly I was unhappy from the get go, my seatpost was way too high and I had to lower it right away but with Retül I haven't changed my position at all.
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Old 06-15-22, 11:18 AM
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More tire clearance is only reason I would go newer. Wider tires comfy.
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Old 06-16-22, 03:30 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
It is a game changer. I also did a Retül fit and can't be happier. They really made some good suggestions and changes that really did honestly work.

$200 is around the average I think. The one we had was a bit north of that but still reasonable for what I did for me. I did one with a friend of mine and it was a static fit and honestly I was unhappy from the get go, my seatpost was way too high and I had to lower it right away but with Retül I haven't changed my position at all.
Just make sure you choose your fitter wisely (check customer reviews etc) regardless of what fitting system they use. Not all Retul fitters are equal and many are poorly trained or inexperienced or both!
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Old 06-16-22, 08:13 AM
  #24  
prj71
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If you are looking for comfort, IMO this is the best bang for the buck right now. Carbon, front and rear Isospeed damper and you can fit 700 x 40 tires on it. But also more than 2k.

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...olorCode=black
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Old 06-17-22, 04:36 PM
  #25  
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Your best upgrade is getting a physical therapist and resolving your back problem. Definitive therapy. I neglected my problems until one day could not stand or walk or sleep much less get on a bike. And have not had a problem in over twenty years. Maybe five or ten hours a year of maintenance exercise.

A modern bike will be even stiffer than your old Fuji. With disk brakes, now universal, the fork and frame have to be stiff. Only way to get comfort now is with the tires. Good choice of saddle, bar shape, handlebar tape, all that stuff makes little improvements but you should get those personal details right on any bike.

Popping for a road bike with some form of spring suspension might do something. Or you might not even like the suspension ride. Suspension from tires works. No idea what a 2012 Fuji will accommodate. If it has any unused room get bigger tires now. Next bike much bigger tires if comfort is the prime factor.
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