Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Cartridge Bearing Removal (non-destructive)

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Cartridge Bearing Removal (non-destructive)

Old 12-17-17, 10:15 PM
  #1  
HerrKaLeun
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Giant Toughroad SLR1 and Motobecane Sturgis NX

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 900 Post(s)
Liked 230 Times in 167 Posts
Cartridge Bearing Removal (non-destructive)

I have a fatbike with cartridge bearings. I believe it has 4 or even 5 bearings in the rear. I want to remove them, inspect, possibly re-grease. So the removal must not destroy it.

It is my understanding pulling on the inner race ruins the bearing. I realize they are not designed to be serviced and upon removal one usually installs new ones. But i still want to do it without destruction. For one to see how it all is made, what condition grease is in etc.

there are V-Pullers, there are blind pullers and there are the methods of jsut hammering them out.

The V-puller and blind puller seem to pull on the inner race. Or am I missing something? How would they not ruin the bearing? And chiseling them out from the other end would also have the risk of accidentally hammering on the inner race. With 4 bearings I'm also not sure how i would push the outer ones out while navigating through the inner ones (I'm not 100% positive on having 4 cartridges, just read somewhere, is a novatec hub)

What options do i have to remove the bearings without ruining them and what exact tools would I need?
HerrKaLeun is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 05:49 AM
  #2  
wesmamyke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,157
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 196 Post(s)
Liked 82 Times in 73 Posts
I don't think you'll have much luck, press fit bearings damage very easily upon removal. You would need access to the outer race, and that's impossible in most hubs.

The only time you can pull bearings just to inspect is when they are not press fit, like most cartridge headsets for example. I have one cartridge bottom bracket that pops apart without tools, but that's not common.

Why not just pull the seal off the outer most bearing? You can check things out, if for some reason it looks bad you can dive in and pull the rest of it apart.

Edit: Some press fit bearings can be pulled and repressed, BMX bottom brackets with huge bearings will tolerate that to some degree. They also have a very loose press fit, loose enough that they come out when you didn't intend them to.

Last edited by wesmamyke; 12-18-17 at 05:53 AM.
wesmamyke is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 06:05 AM
  #3  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 2,440

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 942 Post(s)
Liked 510 Times in 355 Posts
Have you tried checking the hub manufacturer's web site for service instructions?
If there are no signs of problems with the bearings, and the axles spin smoothly with the wheels off the bike, I'd be tempted to leave things alone. Cartridge bearings aren't meant to be serviced other than replacement. Of course, you can add grease, but just adding grease to a failing bearing without thorough cleaning simply postpones the inevitable.
Steve
sweeks is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 06:16 AM
  #4  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 37,675

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5256 Post(s)
Liked 1,561 Times in 894 Posts
It's a myth that pulling on the inner race harms the bearing.

This isn't an invitation to pound on it with a steel hammer, but pullers used properly aren't a problem.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 07:30 AM
  #5  
HerrKaLeun
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Giant Toughroad SLR1 and Motobecane Sturgis NX

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 900 Post(s)
Liked 230 Times in 167 Posts
I didn't find a manual (and couldn't find the specific manufacturer link again) but recall they didn't have documents. But I found a catalog page that indicates it has 5 bearings. I think i will start by just opening it up and seeing what I can see without any removal.

i got this idea while reading "zinn and the art of MTB maintenance" and he shows them to be tapped out with an allen key or similar.

FBinNY: interesting point, even when that is contrary to most sources. but that is how myths work :-) I guess I will see if i feel brave or not.
HerrKaLeun is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 08:25 AM
  #6  
xenologer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,589
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 239 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
assuming 2 in the freehub
and 2 for the hub shell
where's #5?

also, I've tapped a cartridge bearing out with a hammer and punch against the inner race.
It felt grindy after doing that.
Thankfully, they were angular contact (yours probably aren't) and that grindy sensation wore away eventually.

Last edited by xenologer; 12-18-17 at 08:28 AM.
xenologer is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 08:37 AM
  #7  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 26,718

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 145 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5805 Post(s)
Liked 3,590 Times in 2,072 Posts
Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
I have a fatbike with cartridge bearings. I believe it has 4 or even 5 bearings in the rear. I want to remove them, inspect, possibly re-grease. So the removal must not destroy it.
Honestly, don't. There is simply no need for servicing cartridge bearings. Ride them until they wear out and replace. You can pry off the seal and add grease but even that may compromise the seal. Just ride them.

Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
It is my understanding pulling on the inner race ruins the bearing. I realize they are not designed to be serviced and upon removal one usually installs new ones. But i still want to do it without destruction. For one to see how it all is made, what condition grease is in etc.
Not in my experience. Although I usually don't take bearings out unless they need replacement, they can be reused in a pinch. Press fit cartridge bearings don't need a lot of force to remove and as long as you don't go Barney Rubble (i.e. tap them out) on them, you should be fine.

Or, again, just leave them be.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 09:29 AM
  #8  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 2,440

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 942 Post(s)
Liked 510 Times in 355 Posts
Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
FBinNY: interesting point, even when that is contrary to most sources.
FB is right. The thing that kills bearings when they are hammered on is the high loads that are applied; these are essentially "shock" loads which can result in dimpling of races and flattening of ball surfaces. A bearing puller applies the necessary force more gradually and uniformly, so bearing damage may be avoided.

Another example of this is something I was taught years ago about removing cotters from cranks in the absence of a special tool. The crank is supported by a piece of steel pipe while rapping on the threaded end of the cotter; this allows the shock loads to be absorbed by the pipe and not the bottom bracket bearings.
Steve
sweeks is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 09:42 AM
  #9  
cny-bikeman
Mechanic/Tourist
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 7,522

Bikes: 2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Previous bikes:Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fave), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 486 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Given even the potential for damage to the bearing or the seating surface, the time and trouble involved, and the questionable benefit, I don't see any good reason for removal. As suggested just pry off the seal and grease if you want to. Inspection of the bearing will yield little info, and if you want to know "how it is made" the Internet will show you cross sections, exploded diagrams, videos of the manufacturing process, etc.
cny-bikeman is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 10:49 AM
  #10  
IrishBrewer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 304
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
When I overhaul a bike's bearings, I always remove, clean/replace and regrease loose and caged bearings. However, with cartridge bearings, if they feel buttery smooth, I just clean up around them as much as possible and leave them alone.
IrishBrewer is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 11:18 AM
  #11  
Kontact
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 5,465
Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3362 Post(s)
Liked 782 Times in 522 Posts
I don't understand doing this. Cartridge bearings are not designed to be inspected and serviced, they are designed to be used until they need replacement. You're just going to make the hub worse by goofing with them.
Kontact is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 12:33 PM
  #12  
maddog34
Senior Member
 
maddog34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NW Oregon
Posts: 2,736

Bikes: !982 Trek 930R Custom, Diamondback ascent with SERIOUS updates, Fuji Team Pro CF and a '09 Comencal Meta 5.5

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1195 Post(s)
Liked 603 Times in 437 Posts
Originally Posted by Kontact
I don't understand doing this. Cartridge bearings are not designed to be inspected and serviced, they are designed to be used until they need replacement. You're just going to make the hub worse by goofing with them.
how do you know that the bearing needs replaced if you never inspect it?

most bicycle ball bearing assemblies have "rubber" seals that are removable and reusable, if removed carefully.
the old grease can be flushed out and replaced.
the time consumed doing so, compared to the cost of the new bearing, is the determining factor to most folks as to whether it worth doing or not.

if the bearing is rough to turn, notchy, or "loose but gritty"... trash it, get a new bearing.

try measuring the bearing, then searching around for the same size with the same seal configuration... "RS" means one rubber seal, "2RS" means two rubber seals, (there are steel "sealed" ones too, actually just dust covers!))etc. Bicycle parts suppliers tend to put the standard, easily sourced, bearings into their own packaging, then nearly double the cost of those common bearings... Headset and some Crank bearings, are the tricky ones to find aftermarket.... Wheel bearings are at large hardware and auto parts stores even, sometimes

all that said... high impact side loading of ANY ball bearing assy. WILL DAMAGE the bearing... the degree of that damage may be below someone's threshold of detection, but it WILL be there.... the very tiny balls and races in external crank bearing designs, and headsets? those little things will almost certainly be damaged if pounded on at just the inner race, when seated on the outer race.ball bearings don't like heavy side loading... there are special designed (deep channel) ball bearings for higher side loads, but they are expensive due to the hassle in constructing them.... they still wont like being beat on.

Last edited by maddog34; 12-18-17 at 12:42 PM.
maddog34 is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 01:01 PM
  #13  
wschruba
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,611
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 494 Post(s)
Liked 47 Times in 37 Posts
I definitely agree that there is little benefit to be had in 'servicing' a cartridge bearing outside of simply replacing it. It is not hard to tell by feel if a cartridge has grease left in it/has excessive wear. Outside of the (sometimes) specialized angular contact bearings (sometimes) found in hubs, headsets, and bottom brackets, radial cartridge bearings are not expensive to replace.

But, consider: in almost every [cartridge bearing] hub on the market, 3/4 of the bearings typically found in a rear hub (hubshell bearings, outer freehub bearing) are accessible from one side for removing a bearing shield. Probably close to 90% of that number have a shield available to be removed on all four bearings. There is little to be gained in completely removing the bearing cartridge and both shields to clean it.
wschruba is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 03:53 PM
  #14  
Kontact
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 5,465
Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3362 Post(s)
Liked 782 Times in 522 Posts
Originally Posted by maddog34
how do you know that the bearing needs replaced if you never inspect it?

most bicycle ball bearing assemblies have "rubber" seals that are removable and reusable, if removed carefully.
the old grease can be flushed out and replaced.
the time consumed doing so, compared to the cost of the new bearing, is the determining factor to most folks as to whether it worth doing or not.
The "inspection" is feeling how the hub axle turns. If it doesn't feel smooth, it is time to replace the bearings.


The difference between a cup and cone hub and a cartridge bearing is that the races of the cup and cone aren't sacrificial. If you wait until the hub feels bad, you have damaged the major components of the hub. With a cartridge bearing it doesn't matter how damaged the races get - they are disposable. And cheap. And usually last longer than the overhaul interval of a cup and cone.


Removing cartridge bearings and tearing the seals out is like removing the grease from a loose ball system and then stuffing it back in. All you're doing is shortening the life of the cartridge bearing and doing unnecessary labor when there is zero downside to just letting the cartridges wear out.




This is a similar problem to solvent cleaning chains. Sure, you can feel like you are really a maintenance super-star, but all you're actually doing is rinsing the deep lubrication out of the rollers. I sincerely doubt banging cartridges out, opening the good seals and replacing a little grease is doing anything but shortening the life of the bearings.
Kontact is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 06:00 PM
  #15  
HerrKaLeun
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,923

Bikes: Giant Toughroad SLR1 and Motobecane Sturgis NX

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 900 Post(s)
Liked 230 Times in 167 Posts
Originally Posted by xenologer
assuming 2 in the freehub
and 2 for the hub shell
where's #5?

also, I've tapped a cartridge bearing out with a hammer and punch against the inner race.
It felt grindy after doing that.
Thankfully, they were angular contact (yours probably aren't) and that grindy sensation wore away eventually.
I have no idea where the 5th is. But look at page 20 for the D202SB and it says 5 bearings, 4 pawls. Also their 177mm hub next to it has 5 bearings.
Ironically some months ago i took the hub apart (described here) but didn't think of caring baout bearings at all on an all new bike.

Originally Posted by cyccommute
Honestly, don't. There is simply no need for servicing cartridge bearings. Ride them until they wear out and replace. You can pry off the seal and add grease but even that may compromise the seal. Just ride them.

Not in my experience. Although I usually don't take bearings out unless they need replacement, they can be reused in a pinch. Press fit cartridge bearings don't need a lot of force to remove and as long as you don't go Barney Rubble (i.e. tap them out) on them, you should be fine.

Or, again, just leave them be.
I think you and almost everyone else convinced me to just leave them as they are. chances are with the cleaning procedure (degreasing etc.) there is some chance to screw it up by leaving some degreaser in, or by diminishing the seal etc.

If I ever need bearings, how do I find the correct size? Ideally I order them before taking the old ones out. The hub catalog says 2x6902 and 1x15267. This brings me to 15x28x7mm bearings on amazon etc. I assume 15 mm is inner diameter, 28mm outer and 7 mm is thickness. But the TA is 12 mm (this is rear hub, not front). Am I missing something? Shouldn't it be 12 mm inner diameter?

And is there a special grade or standard to use? Or can I just buy any industrial bearings of the correct size? Like for cup/cone I use Grade 25. Or what brand is good? I see $1.99 and $10 bearings.

Thanks for all the replies, good discussion and I learn a lot.
HerrKaLeun is offline  
Old 12-18-17, 06:35 PM
  #16  
maddog34
Senior Member
 
maddog34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NW Oregon
Posts: 2,736

Bikes: !982 Trek 930R Custom, Diamondback ascent with SERIOUS updates, Fuji Team Pro CF and a '09 Comencal Meta 5.5

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1195 Post(s)
Liked 603 Times in 437 Posts
Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
I have no idea where the 5th is. But look at page 20 for the D202SB and it says 5 bearings, 4 pawls. Also their 177mm hub next to it has 5 bearings.
Ironically some months ago i took the hub apart (described here) but didn't think of caring baout bearings at all on an all new bike.



I think you and almost everyone else convinced me to just leave them as they are. chances are with the cleaning procedure (degreasing etc.) there is some chance to screw it up by leaving some degreaser in, or by diminishing the seal etc.

If I ever need bearings, how do I find the correct size? Ideally I order them before taking the old ones out. The hub catalog says 2x6902 and 1x15267. This brings me to 15x28x7mm bearings on amazon etc. I assume 15 mm is inner diameter, 28mm outer and 7 mm is thickness. But the TA is 12 mm (this is rear hub, not front). Am I missing something? Shouldn't it be 12 mm inner diameter?

And is there a special grade or standard to use? Or can I just buy any industrial bearings of the correct size? Like for cup/cone I use Grade 25. Or what brand is good? I see $1.99 and $10 bearings.

Thanks for all the replies, good discussion and I learn a lot.
find quality name brand bearings... Fafnir, Timken, F.A.G., NKS, Koyo, SKS... all good. NO brand name seen? AVOID THEM!
PRICES vary quite a bit... i go to Bearing Distributors to buy bearings... yes, they sell to the public also.
tell them into what you will be installing them into... sweat fit bearings are looser before install, press fit a different tolerance, and so forth... bicycle uses are a loose press fit.

i regularly remove the "seals" from ball bearing assys. to change the grease out for more and better grease... some arrive nearly empty. the "seals" are usually not waterproof , and are called "dust covers" on a parts list.
Seriously, a DUST COVER... water can and does migrate right past the seals. They can be gently prised out of the bearing, then pressed back in with your fingers after regreasing the bearing... this is 40 years of experience talking, not rumors or what some magazine article or blog printed.

tap the bearings out with as little force as possible... i use either a three point tapping, or four point... top, bottom, then left, right.... don't get greedy, work slowly and evenly...the smaller the balls in a bearing, the more likely it is to be damaged during removal... some inner races will collapse enough that they pop right out, tiny balls rolling all over the place!

The single most common cause of premature bearing failure? PRESSURE WASHING the machine in question.... the machine sure looked shiny afterward though!
A good quality bearing that is installed correctly, and not overloaded in it's use, will last many years.
Shoot 3000lb/sq in. water at it, and you might as well order fresh bearings immediately... 'cuz you gonna need 'em soon.........

modern external bearing Bottom Bracket bearings are TINY balls, in a fairly shallow channel, with tiny, weak seals... they fail about once a year... they are overloaded, and experience higher side loading than recommended. I found i could slow the failures by adding fresh grease via a GREASE NEEDLE, and smearing the outer dust seals with good waterproof bike grease every month or so... GXP BB and crank set, CX bike.... the Shimano BB's hold up longer than the GXP BB's... about twice as long, actually... i finally convinced that rider to quit pressure washing his bike after we refreshed both wheel bearings... and then, one week later, i pulled the front apart right after he had P. washed that bike... the hub was full of water again........ Fresh Ultegra hubs and re-lacing a wheel is not cheap, eh? Ultegra hubs of that age feature a sophisticated seal design.....

Last edited by maddog34; 12-18-17 at 06:50 PM.
maddog34 is offline  
Old 12-20-17, 05:02 PM
  #17  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 26,718

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 145 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5805 Post(s)
Liked 3,590 Times in 2,072 Posts
Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
I
If I ever need bearings, how do I find the correct size? Ideally I order them before taking the old ones out. The hub catalog says 2x6902 and 1x15267. This brings me to 15x28x7mm bearings on amazon etc. I assume 15 mm is inner diameter, 28mm outer and 7 mm is thickness. But the TA is 12 mm (this is rear hub, not front). Am I missing something? Shouldn't it be 12 mm inner diameter?
I have no idea what the numbers stand for but they are linked to the size of the bearing. A "6902" is the 28x15x7 (ODxIDxthickness) mm bearing. The "15267" is a 26x15x7mm. The 26mm OD bearing is probably for inside the freehub which needs to be a little smaller.

The 15mm ID diameter is fairly standard in my experience when it comes to the axle for bicycle wheels. TA may be measuring the ID of the axle but that seems a little weird.

As to the cost, I doubt that it matters all that much. The $10 bearing is probably ceramic and might last longer but the cheap $2 bearing is probably going to last roughly 50,000 miles any way...again based on my experience...so going cheap isn't going to cause any problems just as going with the more expensive bearing isn't going to break the bank.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 12-21-17, 08:51 AM
  #18  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Dave Mayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,365
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1136 Post(s)
Liked 394 Times in 232 Posts
If you can clean out and regrease the cartridge bearings in-place, then this is absolutely what you should do. It will take minutes to perform, and potentially add tens of thousands of miles of life to the cartridges.

I've done this dozens of times on many different parts assemblies. All you need to pull this off is a tiny flat-blade screwdriver to pop the seals, some good degreaser (nothing water-based), some replacement grease, and a little patience.

Spending a few minutes on this will avoid having to deal with replacement of the carts a year from now, and then having to make multiple trips to multiple bike shops so that you can beg them to take $100 of your money to replace a couple of bearings that they’ve sourced direct from China for $5.

Last edited by Dave Mayer; 12-21-17 at 08:55 AM.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 12-21-17, 12:02 PM
  #19  
Reynolds 
Passista
 
Reynolds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 7,499

Bikes: 1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS Montaña pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 829 Post(s)
Liked 640 Times in 348 Posts
As said above, pulling cartridge bearings by the inner race doesn't damage them if done properly, IME.
Reynolds is offline  
Old 12-21-17, 12:16 PM
  #20  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,560

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3850 Post(s)
Liked 2,507 Times in 1,545 Posts
Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
I have no idea where the 5th is. But look at page 20 for the D202SB and it says 5 bearings, 4 pawls. Also their 177mm hub next to it has 5 bearings.
Ironically some months ago i took the hub apart (described here) but didn't think of caring baout bearings at all on an all new bike.
That's interesting. The disc brake mount is so far away from the left flange, I wonder if there are separate bearings to support each.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 12-21-17, 12:26 PM
  #21  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,349 Times in 856 Posts
If you Press the bearing out, then it wont be damaged, <guess> they likely used a press to install it..

Arbor Presses are a tool Shops use, one in many Auto service and machine shops.
fietsbob is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
patricio.montes
Bicycle Mechanics
25
02-08-19 09:38 AM
Metaluna
Bicycle Mechanics
5
03-18-17 02:12 PM
WizardOfBoz
Bicycle Mechanics
12
03-11-17 10:23 AM
Valbrona
Bicycle Mechanics
2
05-05-13 08:53 AM
jnbrown
Bicycle Mechanics
5
12-02-11 06:28 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.