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CBD Oil

Old 06-25-18, 12:02 PM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Your skin that keeps things from leaking out does not let things leak in.
Not entirely true. E.g. cut open a clove of garlic and rub it on the palm of your hand. Wait about a minute, then wash thoroughly to remove all traces of the garlic. Wait about half an hour, and have someone smell your breath.
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Old 06-25-18, 12:05 PM
  #52  
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I have noticed that doctors are very reluctant to prescribe pain meds whereas in the past when you had an operation there was a much higher priority placed on pain relief. I've had numerous orthopedic procedures with the same surgeon. The last operation I had last Septemer was for a total knee replacement and I was sent home with pain meds at half the dosage I was given in the hospital and for only 10 days. How are you supposed to rehab properly if the pain is too great to do the exercises? When I spoke to the Doc about pain management he started giving me the new party line about pain medication. I reminded him that I had been through this twice before, with him, and had sufficient medication to minimize the post op pain and didn't develop a opiate dependency. I said that the drugs are for dealing with post op pain so why am I being denied that aspect of my recovery. He reluctantly gave me more medication at a higher dosage and I had an excellent rehab with manageable levels of pain. I realize there is a huge problem with opiate addiction but for the love of God don't crack down on people who need them for the purpose they were intended for.
As far as CBD oil is concerned I get mine on line from Hempland https://www.hemplandusa.com/ It is rather pricey but I feel that it works.
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Old 06-25-18, 12:15 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Doesnt everyone know that rubbing some amazing stuff on your skin is akin to snake oil.

Your skin that keeps things from leaking out does not let things leak in.
Not true, Acetone and the substances dissolved in it go right through the skin (and end up in your liver).

Poison ivy? Not an issue. It just sits outside your impenetrable skin. Just ask rydabent.

Ben
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Old 06-26-18, 10:09 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Not entirely true. E.g. cut open a clove of garlic and rub it on the palm of your hand. Wait about a minute, then wash thoroughly to remove all traces of the garlic. Wait about half an hour, and have someone smell your breath.
Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
Not true, Acetone and the substances dissolved in it go right through the skin (and end up in your liver).

Poison ivy? Not an issue. It just sits outside your impenetrable skin. Just ask rydabent.

Ben
I think that comment from rydabent was a year a ago, long before I bumped this thread to post my recent experiences with CBD and alternatives.

Yup, there are many chemicals that will penetrate the skin, some of which can cause serious problems.

Regarding that rumor about garlic penetrating the skin, that may be derived from an entirely unrelated chemical. I've done a lot of cooking and meal prep, handling lots of garlic barehanded, including the potent heirloom stuff my grandmother cultivated as bug deterrents interspersed among her fruit and vegetable gardens and flowers. I've never noticed any taste from handling garlic, or detected it on the breath of others who handled garlic. However the odor is so potent and clings to the nasal passages that eventually you do taste it. But not from skin penetration.

I'm betting the story derived from a folk remedy that's been around for decades -- DMSO, dimethyl sulfoxide. It's primarily used in labs to protect cells in frozen tissue (my first experience with it). That's where most folks discovered DMSO crosses the skin barrier. Almost every lab student has tried the DMSO trick -- within moments after skin contact you get a garlicky taste in the mouth. It can also carry other substances, which makes it handy for transdermal drug administration. After these properties were discovered DMSO was widely used by ranchers and farmers as a horse liniment, and many rural folks regard it as a treatment for their own arthritis and muscle aches and pains. It's generally more effective mixed with an anti-inflammatory or NSAID such as aspirin.

It's also potentially dangerous and there have been stories, rumors, legends or myths of crusty old ranchers, farmers or cowboys getting sick or dying of nicotine poisoning when DMSO carried nicotine from the buildup of tobacco on their hands into their system. Conceivable, but I don't know whether that particular story has ever been proven to be true.
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Old 06-26-18, 10:21 PM
  #55  
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Regarding topical analgesics, in general it's true that they don't penetrate enough to relieve joint pain. There may be a few exceptions when the joint is immediately below the skin without a thick layer of fat or muscle. However over the past few weeks I've tried everything on my aching shoulder (injured when I was hit by a car last month): muscle rubs containing menthol, eucalyptus, salicylates, camphor, capsaicin, you name it, I've tried it. None of it worked.

What probably does help some folks is the rubbing and massaging action that goes along with applying those topical concoctions. It gets the blood flowing, applies pressure that can feel good, etc.

But I got more benefit from a friend's massaging chair with those kneading finger doodads on my neck and shoulders -- no ointments needed. Ditto, cold and hot packs, and soaking in a hot bath.

Unfortunately over the weeks since my right shoulder was injured, I've also injured my left shoulder by using it too heavily for house work, vacuuming and trying to reach across my chest and behind my back to massage my right shoulder. I accidentally dislocating my own left shoulder and now it aches, pops and crunches almost as badly as the impact-damaged right shoulder.

I've tried a CBD topical -- no effect. I suspect CBD and any material claimed to offer analgesic properties through the skin would need to be used with DMSO as a carrier to be effective.

However CBD ingested -- in capsule form, as a tea, powder or oil -- seems to be effective. But I described that in more detail a couple of days ago, above.

A more recent topical analgesic -- Voltaren or diclofenac -- is claimed to penetrate the skin effectively enough to deliver NSAIDs to joints. I don't know whether the diclofenac itself penetrates the skin or the topical version is in a carrier that penetrates the skin. It was prescribed for me but after waiting two weeks and another two hours in the hospital pharmacy waiting room I gave up and tried something else. The literature says it's proven useful only for osteoarthritis, which I don't have. I'm recovering from a shoulder injury and inflammation and pain related to trauma. So I suspect the prescription was a distraction by health care professionals who are under pressure -- at threat of disciplinary action -- to stop prescribing opiates.

I'm pretty sure these doctors and nurse practitioners know that most patients don't abuse prescription pain relievers, and that there are no equally effective commercially available substitutes. Opiates have been used for millennia because they work to reduce severe pain, far more effectively than anything else. And it's pretty obvious when the same doctors and NPs who told us five years ago not to take so much ibuprofen, but are now advising us to take 800mg four times a day, realize how ridiculous it sounds to well informed patients. But their hands are tied, under threat, and apparently they aren't even permitted to discuss it with patients.

And, as I mentioned earlier in this thread, our health network pain management clinic -- the only place authorized to prescribe opiates or controlled pain relievers beyond 10 days -- has a three month waiting period. Clearly they're overwhelmed and not serious about actually providing pain relief for patients. Right now the entire health system is in a cover-their-own-butts phase.

So those of us suffering chronic pain, or new pain due to trauma, are pretty much on our own. Fortunately there are some effective alternative remedies and it's possible more of the cannabis and/or hemp based products will become more mainstream. The main obstacle right now is the FDA, which hasn't officially agreed with court decisions. For those of us who suffer from occasional severe headaches due to migraine, cluster headaches or trigeminal neuralgia, I'm hoping they'll approve some THC based products that have been proven effective at relieving those types of severe headaches. I've tried various prescription meds and all carry significant health risks, particularly cardiovascular complications with risk of heart attack and stroke.
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Old 06-27-18, 01:38 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by TCR Rider View Post
I have noticed that doctors are very reluctant to prescribe pain meds whereas in the past when you had an operation there was a much higher priority placed on pain relief. I've had numerous orthopedic procedures with the same surgeon. The last operation I had last Septemer was for a total knee replacement and I was sent home with pain meds at half the dosage I was given in the hospital and for only 10 days. How are you supposed to rehab properly if the pain is too great to do the exercises? When I spoke to the Doc about pain management he started giving me the new party line about pain medication. I reminded him that I had been through this twice before, with him, and had sufficient medication to minimize the post op pain and didn't develop a opiate dependency. I said that the drugs are for dealing with post op pain so why am I being denied that aspect of my recovery. He reluctantly gave me more medication at a higher dosage and I had an excellent rehab with manageable levels of pain. I realize there is a huge problem with opiate addiction but for the love of God don't crack down on people who need them for the purpose they were intended for.
As far as CBD oil is concerned I get mine on line from Hempland https://www.hemplandusa.com/ It is rather pricey but I feel that it works.
Bingo. That's precisely what doctors used to tell patients: The prescription pain relievers are to make it possible for you to get up and move around as much as you can. Even my mom's neurologist told her to use the prescription paid meds constructively -- to ease the pain so she could get up and walk with her walker, get some exercise as much as she was capable of, and get the blood circulating to help offset her encroaching dementia. And mom was pretty cooperative with that advice. She never took the full amount allowed daily and usually submitted refill requests every 60-90 days, far longer intervals than the 30 days she was authorized for.

But now they've set an inflexible 10-day limit, almost regardless of the patient's actual condition. When I asked for an extension I pointed out that I declined morphine in the ER and took only a single Tramadol (one of the mildest of the opiate type analgesics, milder even than hydrocodone which used to be considered so mild it wasn't worth regulating back when my grandparents took it routinely in the 1970s-'80s). And my 10 day prescription lasted me almost six weeks.

That's why my previous post in this thread a few days ago included my recent experience with mitragyna speciosa, commonly called kratom in the US, or ketum in Asia. It's still available legally, or at least not banned, in many states. Despite the hype from some proponents and denials by the FDA that it offers any medical efficacy, I was surprised to find it very effective in relieving joint paint -- very specifically -- yet is not a do-it-all analgesic. I still get sinus headaches and the kratom does nothing for that specific pain. But it takes very little to relieve my shoulder and neck pain just enough to do my physical therapy, stretching and indoor bike trainer exercise.

So it's potential useful for folks who are in pain that's beyond what NSAIDs or any OTC analgesics, topical or oral, can relieve. And considering that chronic, severe pain can lead to depression and even risks of suicide, it's potentially a lifesaver for folks who are confronted with an unresponsive health care system that denies any alternative.

But it shouldn't be used without reading the readily available material online to weigh the risks. It's possible that folks who have a history of substance abuse and addiction might be better off avoiding it. But I've never had any substance abuse problems, never been addicted to anything, even quit smoking cigarettes 20+ years ago because I was tired of the sore throats. I never smoked more than half a pack a day, usually only a few cigarettes a day, and never missed them from the day I quit. I like beer but sometimes it sits untouched in my fridge for weeks.

And I don't take the addiction issue lightly. I'm from a family of alcoholics and drug addicts, including much of the extended family of cousins. I'm not sober and straight because of willpower. I just don't have the craving. Apparently the addiction gene or whatever it is just skipped over me. I try not to judge them but I do wonder why that craving and addiction hits some folks and not others.

But don't try to take my coffee away.
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Old 11-19-18, 07:13 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by SammyS View Post
I take CBD. Actually I noticed the effect literally from the first intake, it is a powerful relaxer. In overall within a week, I noticed that my mood was brighter and anxiety lessened. It has also added an extra hour or two to my sleep, which is great as I was only getting 4 or 5. On ncsm website you can find more tips
How many milligrams per dose do you take?
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Old 11-23-18, 05:27 AM
  #58  
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Since my last post in this thread (back in the summer, not long after I was hit by a car), I've tried several brands and types of CBD:
+CBDoil (Plus CBD Oil)
Green Mountain from Vermont
Pinnacle
Lazarus
Jolly Green Oil e-liquid for vaping

I may have a higher tolerance than some folks and need at least 25 mg per dose for any effect. I've taken as much as 100 mg in a single dose and felt only slightly light-headed, which passed after about 15 minutes. My personal therapeutic dose seems to be around 100-200 mg per day, taken in increments of 25-50 mg per dose.

Unfortunately CBD is too expensive and the benefits too subtle to be practical for me. CBD works for me pretty much the same way coffee does. But coffee is much more cost effective, even the better and pricier coffee. And I enjoy it more.

After my current batch of CBD is gone I doubt I'll use it again. Until CBD reaches the level of coffee in terms of price per dose, it's not really cost effective. But I'm open to trying it again if there's a promising new product that's priced reasonably.

Of those I listed above I can only recommend Green Mountain (highly recommended), Lazarus and Pinnacle. The others had no discernible effect. I dislike smoking, didn't enjoy vaping and the e-liquid had no effect anyway. Supposedly vaping is the most effective way to ingest CBD but I couldn't discern any effects.

Green Mountain and Lazarus are closest in price to my personal standard for affordability and cost-effectiveness: The cost per dose is comparable to a decent cup of coffee.

Green Mountain may be both the best quality and best value -- they do everything themselves, from raising the plants to making the finished product, which is among the lowest priced around. They use oil extraction rather than CO2 or alcohol. The oil in the capsules has a distinctive but pleasant hempy flavor, reminiscent of floral hops. I usually dissolved the gel caps under my tongue, then swallowed the rest.

Lazarus is the best value for folks who are eligible for their discounts (veterans like me, disabled folks and those on low income). And Lazarus seems committed to improving their product, including responding to customer comments about flavor, etc. Their RSO oil is the best value, a neutral hemp flavored oil, not as pleasant tasting as Green Mountain but not objectionable. I've also tried the isolate crystals dissolved in hot tea -- it's essentially flavorless despite the added terpenes. Their high potency oils and capsules smelled and tasted fishy to me, but recently Lazarus announced they were reformulating their products to improve the flavors. One of the complications of oral/sublingual CBD is that it supposedly works best in fatty acids. MCT is commonly used but some folks find the flavor unpleasant.

Pinnacle's sublingual/oral oil is a premium product and priced accordingly but good quality. Potent but pleasant flavor. It helped reduce the gagging reflex I experienced during the summer when my thyroid was so swollen I couldn't swallow without a lot of discomfort. I was losing too much weight and the Pinnacle oil relaxed my gag reflex just enough that I could eat and swallow solid food. Some studies indicate the added terpenes may be as significant as the CBD content in helping with some types of nausea and related discomfort.

However, after several months of trying CBD, the most I'd be willing to say is that CBD is roughly comparable to coffee or caffeinated beverages in terms of pain relief and mood enhancement. That's a good thing. It's useful for reducing moderate pain (1-4 on a scale of 10), and subtle mood enhancement without any perceptible "high" or unwanted side effects. It may benefit folks who struggle with depression or other mood disorders. I won't discourage anyone from seeking competent psychiatric and psychological help and appropriate prescription meds, but CBD may be useful for some folks as an alternative or supplement.

But CBD is far too expensive. Even the lowest priced good quality CBD isn't really an affordable alternative medicine. I can get a lot more good quality coffee for the same money and enjoy basically the same effects.

And I'm still skeptical of assertions that CBD or THC can replace opiates. There's a huge difference between the extreme, unbearable pain opiates can handle... and everything else.

For example, I just had surgery this week to remove part of my thyroid. The immediate post-op pain wasn't unbearable and I was actually chattering a bit with the post-op staff, took a selfie to amuse my Facebook friends, etc. The incision area wasn't bad -- it was a shallow incision. And at the moment the worst pain was a sore throat from intubation. So I didn't need any opiates for several hours.

But after 10 pm, a little more than 12 hours post-op, the pain was unbearable. I couldn't swallow or do respiratory therapy without pain. I had one of the worst headaches I've experienced, and I've had migraines and cluster headaches most of my life -- this post-op headache felt like the sinus headache from hell, like my sinuses were filled with lava and trying to explode. It took three doses of hydrocodone, each 4 hours apart, before the pain finally eased up around 6 am. That's a damned long time to be in pain at a level of 7-9 on the scale of 10.

And what really helped was the cup of strong black coffee the overnight RN brought me along with my hydrocodone. That's why I'm only half joking when I say coffee is medicine. The combination of heat, steam, caffeine and a moderate strength pain reliever finally kicked the headache. (Hydrocodone, like Tramadol, is considered only a moderate strength opiate, despite the media hype and disinformation, and not among the most commonly abused meds compared with black market fentanyl and others)

Since being discharged I've needed only one hydrocodone, mostly to ease the throat pain just enough to do my respiratory therapy. By the next day I could do the therapy without any real discomfort, so I probably won't need the prescription meds again. Suits me because I don't like the slightly fuzzy headed side effect.

But that's what opiates are for and I don't see any possibility for any cannabis product to replace opiates for severe pain.

However CBD might be a practical alternative to ibuprofen, aspirin or acetaminophen for folks with moderate chronic pain that isn't directly related to a recent injury or inflammation, especially if low level anxiety or depression are involved -- and it's common for folks with chronic pain to also experience anxiety and depression. I don't see any downside to taking CBD for this kind of moderate low grade chronic pain and associated anxiety/depression.

But the prices will need to come way down. Hopefully mainstreaming CBD and mass production will resolve the cost issue.
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Old 11-23-18, 08:04 AM
  #59  
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Iím getting ready to make a batch of brownies for the holidays. How much CBD oil should I use????
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Old 11-23-18, 08:24 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Yeah yeah we know pot is just wonderful and will cure anything that ails you.

SNAKE OIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Possibly?

But its really too soon to tell. One things for sure, the pharmaceutical industry has been terrified of the Cannabis plant for decades, so that alone tell us there may be some viability behind its capacity to cure a lot -- if not everything -- that ails you.
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Old 11-23-18, 10:31 AM
  #61  
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Topical application is very effective. Even topical aspirin : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9681665
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Old 11-23-18, 05:34 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by jppe View Post
Iím getting ready to make a batch of brownies for the holidays. How much CBD oil should I use????
There are lots of recipes online. Keep in mind that if you plan to share these with other folks be sure they know it includes CBD. Two reasons:

1. Some people may be hypersensitive to CBD and report feeling either drowsy or jittery after using fairly small amounts of some CBD products. So while it takes 25 mg just to get my attention, some folks prefer as little as 3-5 mg. Keep the doses small per serving of brownies or cookies and folks can eat more if they want.

2. Some CBD full spectrum products will contain trace amounts of THC. While the amount should meet federal guidelines to be acceptable, even a trace amount of THC might be detected in some drug testing. Don't put a friend's job at risk. Either tell them what's in the goodies, or use a CBD isolate rather than a full spectrum product. The isolates -- usually a white crystal -- should contain zero THC.

However some CBD aficionados claim CBD isolate is less effective than the full spectrum. Personally I'm inclined to agree -- a small amount of THC seems to be needed to trigger or enhance the benefits of CBD. Some NIH/NCBI studies on the Pub Med site seem to confirm this theory. It appears the CBD also moderates the effect of THC, reducing the sensations of paranoia, inhibitions, even hallucinations or nightmares that a few users report from medical marijuana or high potency THC products.

One of my friends uses medical marijuana to cope with psychological complications from a brain injury. I've noticed that when she uses concentrated THC vape pens she seems to be more insecure and fearful that her family and friends have abandoned her. She's a bit needy and needs daily reassurance that people love her and haven't forgotten her. That's fairly common with some forms of brain damage and dementia. My mom, who died a couple of weeks ago after a long struggle with dementia, had short term memory problems and often thought everyone had abandoned her, even when she'd seen or spoken with them only a day earlier. My mom refused to try medical marijuana because her one experience with pot decades ago made her feel paranoid. So it's not the right solution for everyone.
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Old 11-23-18, 05:42 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post

Your skin that keeps things from leaking out does not let things leak in.
Put some snake venom in DMSO and give yourself a massage.
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Old 11-23-18, 06:16 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Topical application is very effective. Even topical aspirin : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9681665
Topical analgesics are much more complicated than that.

The above Pub Med article refers specifically to a combination of aspirin and ether applied topically to treat a limited range of neuropathic pain. It's not just aspirin or salicylate ointment rubbed on the skin. The common over the counter ointments containing salicylates sold for relieving muscle and joint pain will not and cannot work the same way as the ASA/diethyl ether (ADE) mixture cited in that article.

Even that specialized mixture has only been shown effective on a limited range of neuropathic pain -- the skin discomfort associated with shingles and similar herpes outbreaks.

Topical analgesics need to cross the skin barrier in most cases to be effective. Otherwise the stuff just sits on the skin and does little or nothing. The only thing aspirin-type salicylates do without a transdermal carrier is to relieve some types of acne and skin rashes due to psoriasis, etc.

MSM is the most common transdermal carrier used in over the counter topical analgesics. It delivers the analgesic components below the skin, just enough to reach surface level nerves, muscles, and joints. The theory is that it mostly reduces false pain signals from hyper-sensitized nerves, without significantly reducing real pain signals from current injuries. Products containing MSM include Stopain roll-on, gel and spray; Ted's Pain Cream; one type of Blue Emu (not all Blue Emu products) and one type of Biofreeze (not all). Most topical analgesics contain no MSM or other transdermal carrier, so they cannot penetrate the skin to reach the nerves.

For years farmers and ranchers used DMSO, a lab grade transdermal carrier sold as horse liniment. Some farmers and ranchers discovered they had some relief from arthritis in their own hands when they applied the stuff barehanded to horses. Adding aspirin/salicylate to the DMSO enhances the analgesic effect. But DMSO can be dangerous. It can also carry toxic/poisonous levels of nicotine, pesticides and other chemicals across the skin into the body. And DMSO can cause uncomfortable rashes with itching and burning. MSM is much better suited to human applications.

The theory -- which is being explored further by a UNT Dallas pain researcher -- is that the pain sensitized nerves become "stuck" long after the cause for the pain has been healed. So they're developing methods to reset the nerves to eliminate the false pain signals without numbing the necessary pain signals that tell us when something is wrong in the body due to injury or illness. If their research is successful it could produce treatments that bypass addictive opiates or long term use of NSAIDs to which the body can develop a tolerance or rebound effect.

For years topical analgesics without a transdermal carrier have approximated that effect by using a form of distraction: the topical ointment would produce another form of discomfort that temporarily distracted the patient from the original pain. Capsaicin was one of the most effective. At first it burns and can even produce blisters. With repeated application the skin surface nerves become desensitized to the pain caused by the capsaicin, which in turn desensitizes the surface level nerves to neuropathic pain from shingles, diabetes, and some muscle and joint pain.

The newer topical remedies produce the same effect without introducing new uncomfortable sensations -- burning, tingling, etc. For example, Ted's Pain Cream uses resveratrol, based on the theory that it helps reset hyper-sensitized nerves. User anecdotes indicate it works. The researchers (neuro scientists at UNT Dallas) are hoping to have this confirmed by independent research. But like many topical analgesics they include multiple ingredients which may complicate the study -- menthol or wintergreen oil, salicylates, arnica, others.

The folks who make Ted's Pain Cream are also planning to explore the use of cannabis as a topical analgesic. But this will probably also include a transdermal carrier like MSM.

I've tried one cannabis based topical analgesic and while it smelled pleasant it had no effect on my shoulder joint pain. It lacks a transdermal carrier. Even combined with DMSO or MSM it didn't seem to have any special effect. And the topical balm contained the other familiar ingredients -- menthol, camphor, etc. -- so it's impossible to say whether the cannabis had any effect.

I'm very doubtful about the efficacy of the many topical analgesics that contain only CBD and some form of oil or grease. Too much CBD marketing now relies on hype and anecdotes that may be motivated by placebo effect.
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Old 11-29-18, 05:43 PM
  #65  
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Full spectrum CBD oil has alleviated my dog's limp from arthritis - and she has no idea what a placebo effect is, lol. We gave it to her for 2 months and noticed the improvement then stopped for one month. She started limping again near the end of the month. We put her back on the CBD and the limp was gone in a week. It's been 4 months now and zero limping. This was a condition she had for well over a year and the vet had her on a drug that made her vomit so we stopped using it (rimadyl). No side effects with the CBD....except the munchies, haha. I'd try it if I was having muscle or arthritic pain, why the heck not. Her CBD is not an ointment, though, it is a liquid on her food.
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Old 12-03-18, 07:15 AM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by linberl View Post
Full spectrum CBD oil has alleviated my dog's limp from arthritis - and she has no idea what a placebo effect is, lol. We gave it to her for 2 months and noticed the improvement then stopped for one month. She started limping again near the end of the month. We put her back on the CBD and the limp was gone in a week. It's been 4 months now and zero limping. This was a condition she had for well over a year and the vet had her on a drug that made her vomit so we stopped using it (rimadyl). No side effects with the CBD....except the munchies, haha. I'd try it if I was having muscle or arthritic pain, why the heck not. Her CBD is not an ointment, though, it is a liquid on her food.

My SIL gave me Synergy THC and CBD Relief BalmDixie that is simply awesome on my very arthritic joints as in bone on bone where pain is generated just a wee bit deeper than the skin's surface. Spraying some magnesium citrate on one's skin will most likely have a laxative effect at a much lower cost than OTC drugs or drinking said fluid and it helps in providing a necessary dietary macromineral. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/286839.php
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Old 12-10-18, 01:13 AM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Doesnt everyone know that rubbing some amazing stuff on your skin is akin to snake oil.

Your skin that keeps things from leaking out does not let things leak in.
This is so not true. I lived with the side effects of the fiberglass chemicals that acetone carried through my skin when I built boats for 30 years. Every day. A year ago, the nurse GP I've been seeing recommended a natropathic liver cleaner that would clean out chemicals and heavy metals. Warned me it might be like a mini chemo regime. It did and it was.

Now, I never ate the stuff I worked with and always used a respirator. So it that stuff didn't go through my skin, how did it get there? (There was a lot of contact between the liquid resins, catalysts, acetone and my skin over a 6 year stretch.)

Edit: Sorry, an answer to an old thread I already answered. Oh well.

Ben

Last edited by 79pmooney; 12-10-18 at 01:24 AM.
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Old 12-10-18, 12:01 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
This is so not true. I lived with the side effects of the fiberglass chemicals that acetone carried through my skin when I built boats for 30 years. Every day. A year ago, the nurse GP I've been seeing recommended a natropathic liver cleaner that would clean out chemicals and heavy metals. Warned me it might be like a mini chemo regime. It did and it was.

Now, I never ate the stuff I worked with and always used a respirator. So it that stuff didn't go through my skin, how did it get there? (There was a lot of contact between the liquid resins, catalysts, acetone and my skin over a 6 year stretch.)

Edit: Sorry, an answer to an old thread I already answered. Oh well.

Ben
Far from true. In fact, there are medication that are specifically create and designed to treat the skin as well as use it as a transport medium for medicines to get into the bloodstream. Frankly, I'm surprised that anyone would make such a claim in this day and age. Apparently, he didn't think that one through.
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Old 01-12-19, 01:02 PM
  #69  
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I've been on the fence about researching and getting round to actually purchasing some CBD for my chonic arthritic pain. But since I also no longer tolerate any NSAID meds due to years of prior maximum recommended use, CBD is on my list big time.

One of the things that turned me more towards CBD is that our beloved Rat Terrier, who came to us from the shelter with a damaged hind leg and obviously has some pain after his spirited play, was put on CBD+terpene. It really wound the clock back five years for this 13-year-old doggie - he now spontaneously playposes and tosses his squeakies like he did when he was 2 years old. This impresses - since we have been trying many other remedies prescribed by the vet, which seemed to all be simply pills that did nothing at all.

So a huge thank you @canklecat for your well written posts here on the subject. Really very grateful for your comments. Let's hope the product quality becomes more standardized and the prices start to come down so that those who really need it can afford it.

In my opinion, the major reason that this family of products took so long to come into general awareness is the damnable inclusion of hemp in the Federal DEA Schedule 1 drug list, which includes the most addictive and dangerous ones known. This made research into any of the biochemistry around the natural cannabinoid receptors in our brains exceedingly costly and difficult for researchers. Fooey (in the most rude way imaginable) to all who insisted that this came to pass.
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Old 01-12-19, 03:24 PM
  #70  
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@CrankyFranky: That's the second or third time someone has reported good results with their pets on CBD. It's pretty hard to fake it with pets and I'm not sure a placebo effect works on animals. However animals can respond to positive attention in other ways and I wonder whether the process of trying new products on them also focuses pet owners/carers into renewed attention which may be beneficial.

I've been trying it on the very senior cats I inherited from my mom after she went into a nursing home (mom died in November), 10 and 14 years old. Just three drops in their water dish daily from a 10mg per ml oil -- very small amount. They were both in pretty good health anyway, no chronic illnesses, pain, etc., so there's no dramatic difference.

But the older Siamese seems healthier and more active. For awhile last year she seemed listless, slept all the time, was scrawny and felt bony, too thin. Her fur didn't look good and she was mostly isolating herself. The Siamese was always strictly my mom's cat and it took her a year to adjust to me. At first she'd let me brush her, which may have helped with the appearance of her fur -- the Siamese never grooms herself much. In contrast my own 5 y/o tabby is a beast warrior princess and beauty addict -- she grooms herself constantly. Now the Siamese flops into my lap as soon as I sit down, which makes it easier to check her condition.

Granted, part of the improvement in the Siamese may be due to accepting the transition from mom to me. The 10 y/o Persian cat needed only a few weeks to adjust to me and is a permanent tick or leech, always in my lap, next to me or in bed with me. Even my own tabby isn't quite that attached. So perhaps the older Siamese cat was just getting through a grieving and adjustment period.

For myself, I'm still reluctant to claim miraculous results from CBD. For one thing it seems to take fairly large doses to have any effect on me and it's expensive at 100-200 mg a day. So recently I've switched to adding several drops to everything I drink, mostly coffee early in the day, herbal tea later. Lower dose but more regular throughout the day. For that I like the chocolate mint flavored oil from Green Mountain CBD (soon to be renamed Sunsoil, due to a copyright spat over the popular Green Mountain moniker in Vermont).

But due to longtime chronic pain, worsened last year by injury, CBD is just part of a daily routine of pain management. I have prescriptions for moderate strength opiate and non-opiate pain relievers -- hydrocodone, cyclobenzaprine, diclofenac (time released NSAID) -- but I take only the diclofenac daily. I might need a hydrocodone once a week on really bad days, and the muscle relaxer even less often. I still have some left over from a 30-day supply issued last August, so my VA doctor knows I'm not over-using the stuff.

And I still use the topical analgesics I've mentioned before, especially Stopain roll-on. Helps prep me for warmup exercises before a bike ride. I tend to bunch up my shoulders and neck muscles anyway, and it's worse in cold weather, so it helps to spend 30 minutes warming up first, and dressing appropriately.

I drink 2 or 3 cups of strong coffee, usually espresso, during the first hour or two after I'm awake. It's a remarkably effective adjunct for pain management for me. It may not work for everyone. But for me, coffee does what I'd hoped CBD would do, minus the effect of caffeine on my heart rate and keeping me awake at night if I indulge too late in the day.

I'm hoping CBD will become mainstream enough that pain management specialists will prescribe in instead of the current wonder drug that they seem to believe fixes everything -- gabapentin. Gaba is involved in some neuropathic issues, but it's not a cure-all analgesic. Besides making CBD affordable for folks whose health care plan would cover the cost, it would also increase production which would help reduce the price.
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Old 05-01-19, 05:57 PM
  #71  
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Since my previous posts here I've finally found a CBD product that works as claimed for pain.

And it confirms the anecdotes from other cyclists and athletes that cannabis can relieve pain. I'd been skeptical, only because I hadn't found any CBD that worked for me.

The recent report below indicates that many athletes reported using it to reduce pain and enhance workouts in states where cannabis is legal.

Personally I'm not comfortable using marijuana or THC for the psychoactive effects, especially while riding a bike. Last summer when I was recovering from a shoulder injury, on a couple of occasions I took a couple of puffs from friends' vape pens during rest stops on bike rides. Just that small amount made me discombobulated enough that I dropped to the back of the group and cut the rides short.

But CBD doesn't have that effect and the type that I'm using now is very effective for pain.

I'm back in physical therapy for the shoulder and neck pain and take CBD about an hour beforehand. I wouldn't be able to get through some sessions otherwise. Ditto this afternoon. I had to ride to the store for errands, only a three mile round trip. My back was in spasms. I drank some coffee to which I'd added CBD oil. Within an hour I was able to ride to the store and back.

I've hardly needed the prescription hydrocodone and cyclobenzaprine since finding a CBD product that actually works. And it doesn't leave me drowsy or too lazy to work out.

Exercise Data Reveals 2 Reasons Why Athletes Combine Weed and Workouts
"We were stunned it was that high."
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Old 05-09-19, 08:08 PM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by TCR Rider View Post
So then I assume you don't sweat.
I realize this has been a year and a half, still deserves recognition.
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