Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Hybrid Bicycles
Reload this Page >

Ok, which hybrid bike should I buy for $1000?

Notices
Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

Ok, which hybrid bike should I buy for $1000?

Old 07-16-19, 01:00 PM
  #1  
WarrenC
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Ok, which hybrid bike should I buy for $1000?

Hi everyone

since I know nothing about bikes, which hybrid bike should I be looking at which offers efficiency, comfort and best bang for the buck. I have a budget of $1000

thank you

Warren
WarrenC is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 02:27 PM
  #2  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 750

Bikes: 1991 Fuji Sundance , 2017 Salsa Vaya, 1990 Trek 520

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 22 Posts
Will this be your first bike or have you been riding awhile? If it's your first, it is difficult to get the right bike without riding experience and I'd suggest lowering your budget and saving the rest for a 2nd bike when you know what you want.

To answer your question more directly, I'd look for a hybrid with no suspension that can fit at least 40mm width tires. I prefer steel so of my choices would be a Marin Muirwoods or Jamis Sequel. However, other notable options are the Trek FX, Specialized Sirrus, Giant Escape / Fastroad and Jamis Coda. These bikes have different component levels at different prices.
katsup is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 03:04 PM
  #3  
Skipjacks
Senior Member
 
Skipjacks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Mid Atlantic / USA
Posts: 2,032

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Crosstrail / 2013 Trek Crossrip Elite

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 975 Post(s)
Liked 187 Times in 123 Posts
Originally Posted by katsup View Post
Will this be your first bike or have you been riding awhile? If it's your first, it is difficult to get the right bike without riding experience and I'd suggest lowering your budget and saving the rest for a 2nd bike when you know what you want.
This is great advice.

Take it.

As for the original question, don't spend $1000 on a hybrid. Any hybrid.

The difference between a $500 hybrid and a $1000 hybrid are the component quality, mostly the drive train. You might get slightly nicer wheels on a $1000 hybrid, but I doubt most people would notice.

The thing is...when the drive train on the $500 bike wears out, you can get an all new drive train for like $150. I just did this. It's not an expensive upgrade. Since it's a hybrid you aren't likely to upgrade it to a really high end drive train that would cost more. You're likely to replace it with a 'bottom line name brand but better than the generic stock' drive train that came on the bike.

A hyrbid is a great bike choice for many kinds of riding, especially if you are doing multiple kinds of riding and only want one bike. I'm not trashing the whole hybrid genre. I have one. I ride it every day. I love it. I spent $650 on it. But I wouldn't have spent $1 more. I've had to do repairs, mostly from generic components that just wore out fast. But each repair is relatively cheap. (Not to mention your credit card may have a built in extended warranty that pays for some of those repair) And I'm still well under $1000 total spend after 3+ years.

There is nothing about the more expensive models of the same bike that I wish I had.

Last edited by Skipjacks; 07-17-19 at 08:42 AM.
Skipjacks is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 03:22 PM
  #4  
WarrenC
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
This would be my 2nd bike. I have a Trek DS 8.4 for over 6 years that I just cant get comfortable. As near as I can tell the reach is too far for my arms. This is after adjusting and twiddling everything I can think of, including changing numerous components. All I'm looking for is a do everything bike that is comfortable and looks cool and allows me to ride up to 50km a time. I am open to all suggestions.
WarrenC is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 03:24 PM
  #5  
Rick53 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Michigan, United States of America
Posts: 102

Bikes: Verve, Dual Sport 2 and FX3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by katsup View Post
Will this be your first bike or have you been riding awhile? If it's your first, it is difficult to get the right bike without riding experience and I'd suggest lowering your budget and saving the rest for a 2nd bike when you know what you want.

To answer your question more directly, I'd look for a hybrid with no suspension that can fit at least 40mm width tires. I prefer steel so of my choices would be a Marin Muirwoods or Jamis Sequel. However, other notable options are the Trek FX, Specialized Sirrus, Giant Escape / Fastroad and Jamis Coda. These bikes have different component levels at different prices.
Why no suspension?
Rick53 is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 03:30 PM
  #6  
Rick53 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Michigan, United States of America
Posts: 102

Bikes: Verve, Dual Sport 2 and FX3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by WarrenC View Post
This would be my 2nd bike. I have a Trek DS 8.4 for over 6 years that I just cant get comfortable. As near as I can tell the reach is too far for my arms. This is after adjusting and twiddling everything I can think of, including changing numerous components. All I'm looking for is a do everything bike that is comfortable and looks cool and allows me to ride up to 50km a time. I am open to all suggestions.
Trek Dual Sport 8 ? Probably you need more upright gooseneck : The Trek FX is slightly more upright then the DS and the verve can be adjusted to bring the handle bars closer :I have a Dual 2 and like it : But I am 6' tall with 34 inch long arms : Sounds like you need more of an upright ride
Rick53 is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 03:35 PM
  #7  
WarrenC
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I definitely need a more upright ride. Hands go numb and neck shoulder stiffness go with all my bike rides.
WarrenC is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 03:37 PM
  #8  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 750

Bikes: 1991 Fuji Sundance , 2017 Salsa Vaya, 1990 Trek 520

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by Rick53 View Post
Why no suspension?
At the mentioned price point, it is heavy, feels like a pogo stick and needs additional maintenance / repair. Even after 3 years I have had to take part, clean and grease a Suntour XCT fork as it was seized. Most people would not know how to do this and would either ride around as is or pay a shop to do it. Higher end forks are nice and feel great, especially on single track, but also need maintenance.

The wide tires (40mm+) will help smooth out the bumps and light trails without the above cons which is why I stick with rigid bikes (aside from single track).
katsup is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 03:45 PM
  #9  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 750

Bikes: 1991 Fuji Sundance , 2017 Salsa Vaya, 1990 Trek 520

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by WarrenC View Post
I definitely need a more upright ride. Hands go numb and neck shoulder stiffness go with all my bike rides.
Ask the shop if you can take the bike you are interested in on a 30mi (50km) ride. You may have to hand them your driver's license, but the shops by me would allow this.
katsup is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 03:46 PM
  #10  
Helderberg
Senior Member
 
Helderberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Rolesville NC
Posts: 407

Bikes: Had an old Columbia in the 80's, here a used Schwinn hybrid, now a Cannondale Quick 7 & 3.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 19 Posts
I ride a Cannondale Quick 3 and that was a decision between a Giant Escape 2. The Giant felt too cramped to my taste so I got the Cannondale. I would suggest a test ride on the Giant and see what you think. That or the Escape 1 depending on your finances.
Frank.
Helderberg is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 05:16 PM
  #11  
puma1552
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 667

Bikes: '17 Colnago C-RS (Full 5800); '16 Specialized Sirrus Elite

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Liked 32 Times in 21 Posts
See if you can get a Sirrus elite negotiated down to $1k, or grab a Sirrus Sport. Great bikes.
puma1552 is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 06:42 PM
  #12  
HerrKaLeun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,403

Bikes: Giant Toughroad SLR1 and Motobecane Sturgis NX

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 680 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 26 Posts
A Giant Toughroad would be comfortable due to larger 50mm tires and CF fork.

As for the comment that hybrids are not worth upgrading.... well, technically no bike is if you look at it economically. My toughroad ended up with new DT Swiss wheels with wider rims, new tires, Brooks saddle, jones bar, XT 1x11 drivetrain, jones bar, custom frame bag..... I realize it all may not be economical, but it rides perfectly, is fun and is my road, gravel and hybrid bike.... all 3 in one single bike.
HerrKaLeun is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 07:23 PM
  #13  
travbikeman
Senior Member
 
travbikeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Inwood WV, but maybe moving closer to the C&O areas
Posts: 1,267

Bikes: 2015 Specialized Crosstrail Sport Disc, Prior bikes owned: 1995 Trek 830, 1988 Schwinn Prelude

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by katsup View Post
At the mentioned price point, it is heavy, feels like a pogo stick and needs additional maintenance / repair. Even after 3 years I have had to take part, clean and grease a Suntour XCT fork as it was seized. Most people would not know how to do this and would either ride around as is or pay a shop to do it. Higher end forks are nice and feel great, especially on single track, but also need maintenance.

The wide tires (40mm+) will help smooth out the bumps and light trails without the above cons which is why I stick with rigid bikes (aside from single track).
At mentioned $1000 price the OP stated, you can get a hybrid with an air shock that is not a pogo stick. The larger tires also help, but having both a good suspension and larger tires makes for a great ride on trails.

Examples:

Canyon Pathlite SL 7 - Only 26 pounds with the suspension

Canyon Pathlite 6 - 27.7 lbs

Giant Roam 1 Disc

Or, can always buy a nice hybrid that fits the rider really well and just buy a replacement suspension like I did:

Rockshox Paragon Gold
travbikeman is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 08:17 PM
  #14  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 750

Bikes: 1991 Fuji Sundance , 2017 Salsa Vaya, 1990 Trek 520

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by travbikeman View Post
At mentioned $1000 price the OP stated, you can get a hybrid with an air shock that is not a pogo stick. The larger tires also help, but having both a good suspension and larger tires makes for a great ride on trails.

Examples:

Canyon Pathlite SL 7 - Only 26 pounds with the suspension

Canyon Pathlite 6 - 27.7 lbs

Giant Roam 1 Disc

Or, can always buy a nice hybrid that fits the rider really well and just buy a replacement suspension like I did:

Rockshox Paragon Gold
The comparable Canyon with Carbon fork weighs 22lbs. It has 30mm tires vs 40mm on the Pathlite, but that doesn't make up the 4lb difference.

Canyon Roadlite 7.0
katsup is offline  
Old 07-16-19, 09:49 PM
  #15  
HerrKaLeun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,403

Bikes: Giant Toughroad SLR1 and Motobecane Sturgis NX

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 680 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 26 Posts
Holy cow, those Canyons all are great values if you like that type.

I'm not convinced a hybrid (and a bike with 40mm tires is not really off roadish) needs suspension. But if you are a suspension guy, this is a steal.

I have 2.15" tires and 30mm rim on my Toughroad in front and that is the greatest ride ever over gravel trails and our horrible roads. But to each their own.
HerrKaLeun is offline  
Old 07-17-19, 06:27 AM
  #16  
travbikeman
Senior Member
 
travbikeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Inwood WV, but maybe moving closer to the C&O areas
Posts: 1,267

Bikes: 2015 Specialized Crosstrail Sport Disc, Prior bikes owned: 1995 Trek 830, 1988 Schwinn Prelude

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by katsup View Post
The comparable Canyon with Carbon fork weighs 22lbs. It has 30mm tires vs 40mm on the Pathlite, but that doesn't make up the 4lb difference.

Canyon Roadlite 7.0
That is a really nice bike for what I believe to be a great deal. But it's the whole package that makes it lighter. Not just the fork, but the lighter groupset, wheels, tires and such.
travbikeman is offline  
Old 07-17-19, 06:29 AM
  #17  
travbikeman
Senior Member
 
travbikeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Inwood WV, but maybe moving closer to the C&O areas
Posts: 1,267

Bikes: 2015 Specialized Crosstrail Sport Disc, Prior bikes owned: 1995 Trek 830, 1988 Schwinn Prelude

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
Holy cow, those Canyons all are great values if you like that type.

I'm not convinced a hybrid (and a bike with 40mm tires is not really off roadish) needs suspension. But if you are a suspension guy, this is a steal.

I have 2.15" tires and 30mm rim on my Toughroad in front and that is the greatest ride ever over gravel trails and our horrible roads. But to each their own.
Those Toughroads are fun bikes to ride. I tested one a few years ago and have kind of regretted not getting it.
travbikeman is offline  
Old 07-17-19, 08:46 AM
  #18  
Skipjacks
Senior Member
 
Skipjacks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Mid Atlantic / USA
Posts: 2,032

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Crosstrail / 2013 Trek Crossrip Elite

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 975 Post(s)
Liked 187 Times in 123 Posts
Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
Holy cow, those Canyons all are great values if you like that type.

I'm not convinced a hybrid (and a bike with 40mm tires is not really off roadish) needs suspension. But if you are a suspension guy, this is a steal.

I have 2.15" tires and 30mm rim on my Toughroad in front and that is the greatest ride ever over gravel trails and our horrible roads. But to each their own.
Suspension depends on where you are riding.

On well maintained roads, suspension is a waste of space and should be locked out most of the time.

On crappy roads with lots of bumps and disjointed concrete/pavement even cheap spring suspension can do a lot towards making the ride more comfortable and less jarring on your hands.
Skipjacks is offline  
Old 07-17-19, 10:57 AM
  #19  
hybridbkrdr
we be rollin'
 
hybridbkrdr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Quebec, Canada
Posts: 1,731
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
If you're going 650b, then there's the...

Kona Dew Deluxe
Jamis Sequel
Masi Caffe Corsa

The Masi Strada Vita Uno is less than $1K but has fenders and a chainguard.
hybridbkrdr is offline  
Old 07-17-19, 01:40 PM
  #20  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 750

Bikes: 1991 Fuji Sundance , 2017 Salsa Vaya, 1990 Trek 520

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by travbikeman View Post
That is a really nice bike for what I believe to be a great deal. But it's the whole package that makes it lighter. Not just the fork, but the lighter groupset, wheels, tires and such.
The groupsets are similar weight

Roadlite
105 (R7000)
105 R7000 weighed in at 2,180g without cables (Rim Brake Version)
Source
Pathlite 7
Mix of SLX (M7000) and XT (M8000)
SLX Weights:
Crankset 718g (32T)
Shifter 120g (with i-spec II)
Cassette 476g
Rear mech 323g
Total w/o chain: 1,637g
Source
+ 120g (front shifter), 152.1g (front deraileur) + brakes and additional chainring and they are within 100-200g of each other (didn't look up each part separately)

Wheels are likely similar weight, and the tires are 10mm bigger on the pathlite, but that is not enough to fill the 4 pound gap between the suspension vs non suspension version. The suspension probably adds around 2lbs of weight which is minimal, but it not worth it when you consider the additional cons mentioned above.

This is just my opinion after thinking I needed suspension when I started (first 2 hybrids had suspension).

Last edited by katsup; 07-17-19 at 02:17 PM.
katsup is offline  
Old 07-17-19, 02:21 PM
  #21  
travbikeman
Senior Member
 
travbikeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Inwood WV, but maybe moving closer to the C&O areas
Posts: 1,267

Bikes: 2015 Specialized Crosstrail Sport Disc, Prior bikes owned: 1995 Trek 830, 1988 Schwinn Prelude

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Your enthusiasm for this cool hobby is great. Love how you have done so much research on proving that one hybrid bike that is a few pounds less than another is a better bike.

But it's not, cause it's a matter of opinion and preference of who buys the bike. I find it hilarious that some are so tuned into lower weight is a better bike, but it doesn't really matter when you are not racing. All hybrids are great every day riding bikes, that we can tune to our needs and preferences.

The OP needs to go ride many bikes and figure out what they like. It doesn't matter what any of us like. If the OP chooses suspension or non suspension, as long as the bike is comfortable and provides enjoyment, then great.

Your basing your opinion on suspensions off of a extremely cheap mountain bike suspension you used to have. Suntour XCT, The suspensions I listed above are much higher quality than that "Pogo stick."

As for now, I'm going to continue laughing at the argument that lighter is better in the hybrid category cause it doesn't have suspension.

Last edited by travbikeman; 07-17-19 at 02:30 PM.
travbikeman is offline  
Old 07-17-19, 02:28 PM
  #22  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 750

Bikes: 1991 Fuji Sundance , 2017 Salsa Vaya, 1990 Trek 520

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by travbikeman View Post
As for now, I'm going to continue laughing at the argument that lighter is better in the hybrid category cause it doesn't have suspension.
I think you missed where I said all the cons regarding suspension in hybrids, weight is just one factor that you brought up in post 13. You obviously enjoy suspension hybrid, and we all have our own tastes, so I will stop replying.
katsup is offline  
Old 07-17-19, 04:10 PM
  #23  
HerrKaLeun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,403

Bikes: Giant Toughroad SLR1 and Motobecane Sturgis NX

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 680 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by Skipjacks View Post
Suspension depends on where you are riding.

On well maintained roads, suspension is a waste of space and should be locked out most of the time.

On crappy roads with lots of bumps and disjointed concrete/pavement even cheap spring suspension can do a lot towards making the ride more comfortable and less jarring on your hands.
True. But to be consistent with comfort and dealing with bad roads they should have used 50mm tires and wider rims in addition to the suspension fork. But that would have increased the marketing weight.....

Regarding weight.... true, there are diminishing returns once you have decent components, good AL frame and CF fork. But you don't want a heavy pug either.... even if it just for lifting around. If you are a light rider, you notice a few pounds.
HerrKaLeun is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.