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Chain. Pin or quicklink

Old 06-22-22, 06:53 PM
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CrimsonEclipse
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Chain. Pin or quicklink

When installing a chain, which is stronger: Pressing the pin with a chain tool or a quick link?

I had a chain break on me twice and I'm not sure if it was due to luck or my press in pin was a weak point.
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Old 06-22-22, 07:23 PM
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Depending on how many speeds your chain was designed for can have an effect as the fewer the speeds the easier it is to install the pin correctly and pins will usually be considered stronger as long as they are installed correctly but more opportunity for error. Current Quick Links of most brands are very reliable and easy to install correctly with not much chance of screwing it up but still gets done wrong occaisionally. .
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Old 06-22-22, 07:52 PM
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9 speed.

I had recently checked it for chain stretch, and it was still well within limits even though it has thousands of miles on it.

Getting a new chain (2 breaks is enough) and cassette too.
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Old 06-22-22, 08:27 PM
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...quick links seem to work pretty well for me. Not sure what you mean by a "press in pin" ? The newer chain pins are often peened, so when you press one in and out again, it enlarges the plate hole and can lead to failure. I know Shimano had those press in and break off pins, but you're not supposed to break the chain in the same place twice, for this same reason. I stopped using Shimano chains for this reason, so I'm not up on what they sell now.
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Old 06-22-22, 08:53 PM
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I'm with 3alarmer, I now only use chains with the quick-link, KMC and SRAM. It is practically idiot proof, and I should know.
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Old 06-22-22, 09:36 PM
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Probably either or. I really am not picky but yes a quick-link is a lot easier. Though I have put in plenty of pins over time and I don't really mind it at all but yes 3alarmer makes a decent point though I haven't had that problem yet.
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Old 06-22-22, 11:38 PM
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As mentioned above, modern chains have pins that are peened; the ends are flared out.

It is impossible to pushed a larger diameter pin end through a smaller diameter chain side plate without reducing the flare.

Re-using that same pin will result in a weak spot in the chain and probably be susceptible to lateral forces from a poor shift.

In my mind a quick link will always be stronger.

John
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Old 06-23-22, 12:13 AM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
When installing a chain, which is stronger: Pressing the pin with a chain tool or a quick link?

I had a chain break on me twice and I'm not sure if it was due to luck or my press in pin was a weak point.
Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
9 speed.

I had recently checked it for chain stretch, and it was still well within limits even though it has thousands of miles on it.

Getting a new chain (2 breaks is enough) and cassette too.
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
.
...quick links seem to work pretty well for me. Not sure what you mean by a "press in pin" ? The newer chain pins are often peened, so when you press one in and out again, it enlarges the plate hole and can lead to failure. I know Shimano had those press in and break off pins, but you're not supposed to break the chain in the same place twice, for this same reason. I stopped using Shimano chains for this reason, so I'm not up on what they sell now.
yes, I still wonder if the OP was re-using the pin he pressed out or using the type of pin that Shimano uses (or used to use?) to replace the pushed out pin. If re-using, it's operator error and not surprising that they failed.
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Old 06-23-22, 03:05 AM
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The quality of the tool has a lot to do with the success.

We will reuse the pin for single speed or 5/6/7/8 speed chain of non-peened rivets.
If it had peened rivets, we will use a quick-link or missing link connector.

Cheap chain tools don't keep the chain in a correct position for re-pinning.
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Old 06-24-22, 06:46 PM
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What's a peened rivet?

My chain had solid pins
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Old 06-24-22, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
What's a peened rivet?

My chain had solid pins
"Peened" rivets (aka pins) are flared at the ends to make a strong connection in thin chains like 9-speed and above. Pushing them out breaks off the flair and reams out the hole in the side plates leaving a weak connection at that point if that pin is reused. A proper connection requires a quick link or a specific joining pin like Shimano provides. I do like quick links but have had no problems with Shimano's specific joining pins when used once as specified.
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Old 06-25-22, 02:16 AM
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On older chains for 5/6/7 you could push the pin out fairly easily with the tool. With the new chains you have a hard time getting the pins out and it takes a good deal of force to get them out because they are flared as everyone here is saying. Shimano has one way of attaching chains, Campy has another, but I use KMC chains now with the master link which is so much easier.

Last edited by zacster; 06-25-22 at 02:27 AM.
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Old 06-25-22, 04:21 AM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
What's a peened rivet?

My chain had solid pins
​​​​​​https://www.orbitform.com/resources-...ed-peen-tools/
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Old 06-25-22, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
"Peened" rivets (aka pins) are flared at the ends to make a strong connection in thin chains like 9-speed and above. Pushing them out breaks off the flair and reams out the hole in the side plates leaving a weak connection at that point if that pin is reused. A proper connection requires a quick link or a specific joining pin like Shimano provides. I do like quick links but have had no problems with Shimano's specific joining pins when used once as specified.
Originally Posted by zacster View Post
On older chains for 5/6/7 you could push the pin out fairly easily with the tool. With the new chains you have a hard time getting the pins out and it takes a good deal of force to get them out because they are flared as everyone here is saying. Shimano has one way of attaching chains, Campy has another, but I use KMC chains now with the master link which is so much easier.
Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
So it might have been designed to ONLY use a quick link?

So how do I identify a peened rivet chain?

Is it solid? hollow?
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Old 06-25-22, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
So it might have been designed to ONLY use a quick link?

So how do I identify a peened rivet chain?

Is it solid? hollow?
At this point in time, Id assume that all chains are peened. You might find some cheap chains like the old style but those would certainly be limited to anything for use on 5 and 6 speeds. One way to tell is to be observant during pin removal. If the pin takes a lot of force to remove and (or) makes a snap sound when it finally begins to push out, the pin is peened.

But, frankly, using a quick link on any chain is just easier. Its simple, works well, is strong, and doesnt require all the fiddling of pushing a pin back in.
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Old 06-25-22, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
So it might have been designed to ONLY use a quick link?

So how do I identify a peened rivet chain?

Is it solid? hollow?
New Shimano and Campy chains are designed to use a special pin, KMC chains are designed to use a quick link, I believe SRAM is too. I don't know about any other, nor does this apply to old style chains. I remember the first 9sp chain I installed and thinking, "what a PITA this is".
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Old 06-25-22, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by zacster View Post
New Shimano and Campy chains are designed to use a special pin, KMC chains are designed to use a quick link, I believe SRAM is too. I don't know about any other, nor does this apply to old style chains. I remember the first 9sp chain I installed and thinking, "what a PITA this is".
​​​​​​https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/techn...uick-link.html

​​​​​​https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Sup...onnecting_link
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Old 06-25-22, 11:59 AM
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I guess they got on the bandwagon. The Campy is for 13sp, which I didn't even know was a thing.

It makes me feel old that 10sp is an old technology now.
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Old 06-25-22, 12:50 PM
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So, quick link from now on.

Alright, thanks guys!
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Old 06-28-22, 07:43 AM
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If you don't want to use a tool with your quick link, I can recommend Connex Quick Links. Ingenious design.
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Old 06-29-22, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
If you don't want to use a tool with your quick link, I can recommend Connex Quick Links. Ingenious design.
ok, what's so ingenious about them?
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Old 06-29-22, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
ok, what's so ingenious about them?
They connect/disconnect without tools. The shape and design of the holes keeps them connected without a friction fit so they can be used indefinitely.
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