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New to me 1987 Schwinn Tempo

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New to me 1987 Schwinn Tempo

Old 08-10-22, 07:17 AM
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New to me 1987 Schwinn Tempo

I recently picked up an 87 Tempo that has been stored in someone's basement for over 20 years. I picked it up for my wife, so we could ride old school together. I removed the original pedals, which was a PITA. I replaced the original tires on it ( which was in good shape still) and took it for a ride. I have to say that I was pleasantly surprised how well it rode and felt. I have zero complaints so far other than I am struggling to get the brakes to work without rubbing on the rims.



Tom
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Old 08-10-22, 07:55 AM
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Good looking classic bike. Putting a white Selle San Marco saddle on there will make it a real 1980s showstopper.

If you're at all handy mechanically, you should easily be able to properly adjust the brakes/true the wheels.
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Old 08-10-22, 10:29 AM
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Cabling needs to be almost entirely free-moving, with little to no detectable "losses" with respect to uptake and release of cable as the lever moves.

Calipers need to be free-moving on their own, again with return force completely smooth as when applying the brake. Lubricate and adjust pivot tension as needed, also lubricate both ends of the return springs where they meet the little stops on each arm.

***Cable housings need to be of sufficient length (relative to handlebar position) so as to allow each caliper to "float" on it's pivot instead of being pulled/biased toward one side.
Check this AFTER swiveling the bars back and forth to the limits.

The brake pads being thirty-something years old are not likely to give good braking even with the the cables in good shape, though sometimes an exception to this arises. Shimano pads usually don't age well at all as compared to DiaCompe or Suntour pads.

The Tempo was a very good (and good-looking) bike, excellent road frame geometry and with good modest componentry, as long as the bike's (French?) hubs weren't set up with over-tight adjustment as was so often the case with 1980's Schwinns. ***There must be some bit of free-play in the axle bearing's adjustment to account for the axles shortening in response to the quick-release levers applying tension over the length of the axles!
Your later-model (1988?) Tempo likely has the superior Shimano freehub system hubset.

The later Tempos with indexed shift levers will by now need to have each lever pivot lubricated with light oil dripped into the space under the mounting screw/washer, thus giving free movement and solid (loud) clicks at the right lever. Also be sure that the cable is lubricated at the bottom bracket guide.

Last edited by dddd; 08-10-22 at 10:35 AM.
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Old 08-10-22, 10:34 AM
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The dark anodized rims look pristine in the photo. Same for the white brake hoods. Get us some closer photos, especially the drive (crank) side. If this was kept in a dry basement, you have a real nice survivor on your hands.
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Old 08-10-22, 12:31 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Cabling needs to be almost entirely free-moving, with little to no detectable "losses" with respect to uptake and release of cable as the lever moves.

Calipers need to be free-moving on their own, again with return force completely smooth as when applying the brake. Lubricate and adjust pivot tension as needed, also lubricate both ends of the return springs where they meet the little stops on each arm.

***Cable housings need to be of sufficient length (relative to handlebar position) so as to allow each caliper to "float" on it's pivot instead of being pulled/biased toward one side.
Check this AFTER swiveling the bars back and forth to the limits.

The brake pads being thirty-something years old are not likely to give good braking even with the the cables in good shape, though sometimes an exception to this arises. Shimano pads usually don't age well at all as compared to DiaCompe or Suntour pads.

The Tempo was a very good (and good-looking) bike, excellent road frame geometry and with good modest componentry, as long as the bike's (French?) hubs weren't set up with over-tight adjustment as was so often the case with 1980's Schwinns. ***There must be some bit of free-play in the axle bearing's adjustment to account for the axles shortening in response to the quick-release levers applying tension over the length of the axles!
Your later-model (1988?) Tempo likely has the superior Shimano freehub system hubset.

The later Tempos with indexed shift levers will by now need to have each lever pivot lubricated with light oil dripped into the space under the mounting screw/washer, thus giving free movement and solid (loud) clicks at the right lever. Also be sure that the cable is lubricated at the bottom bracket guide.

Thank you for all that info. The movement of the cables is one thing I did noticed, I will be doing everything you just said to correct that.

What are French Hubs?
What kind of oil should I use when lubricating?

Tom
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Old 08-10-22, 12:54 PM
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Sometimes some silicone/Teflon-based lube will nicely restore the old cabling's performance. Sometimes not.

Oiling the shift levers, any light oil that penetrates readily should work, just avoid lubes like WD40 which are like 90% solvent and will evaporate away.

Schwinn used a lot of French-made Maillard hubs in their wheels during the '80's, unimpressive quality and always installed with bearings adjusted over-tight (which inevitably led to very early bearing-pitting failure).
Hub bearings are lubed with grease, though often I just adjust the bearings and then oil them without disassembly, for my first few hundreds of miles of use.
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Old 08-10-22, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Sometimes some silicone/Teflon-based lube will nicely restore the old cabling's performance. Sometimes not.

Oiling the shift levers, any light oil that penetrates readily should work, just avoid lubes like WD40 which are like 90% solvent and will evaporate away.

Schwinn used a lot of French-made Maillard hubs in their wheels during the '80's, unimpressive quality and always installed with bearings adjusted over-tight (which inevitably led to very early bearing-pitting failure).
Hub bearings are lubed with grease, though often I just adjust the bearings and then oil them without disassembly, for my first few hundreds of miles of use.
Thank you!
Tom
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Old 08-10-22, 01:51 PM
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Congratulations on obtaining one of the finest bikes Schwinn ever produced. Seriously!
Iíve owned at least a dozen of those 87ís over the years and found them to be both sprightly in acceleration and comfortable enough for centuries. Nice enough that all of them were sold to people who were on rides with me and decided that my Tempo was a worthy acquisition.
They do indeed come with Maillard freewheel hubs and soft-ish Wolber rims. Not a terrible wheelset but not the best, either. You may want to replace them eventually.
The Shimano New 105 (aka 1050) six speed components are bomb-proof. If it were mine, Iíd disassemble the RD and service the pulley wheels as well as the hubs and bottom bracket, simply due to the age of the lubricants therein.
Thatís also a frameset well worth upgrading. Mine current runs Dura Ace 10 speed with downtube shifters and a White Industries/Kinlin wheelset. Itís easily as fast and comfortable as any of my other bikes, most of which cost many times what the Tempo did.
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Old 08-10-22, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by rccardr View Post
Congratulations on obtaining one of the finest bikes Schwinn ever produced. Seriously!
Iíve owned at least a dozen of those 87ís over the years and found them to be both sprightly in acceleration and comfortable enough for centuries. Nice enough that all of them were sold to people who were on rides with me and decided that my Tempo was a worthy acquisition.
They do indeed come with Maillard freewheel hubs and soft-ish Wolber rims. Not a terrible wheelset but not the best, either. You may want to replace them eventually.
The Shimano New 105 (aka 1050) six speed components are bomb-proof. If it were mine, Iíd disassemble the RD and service the pulley wheels as well as the hubs and bottom bracket, simply due to the age of the lubricants therein.
Thatís also a frameset well worth upgrading. Mine current runs Dura Ace 10 speed with downtube shifters and a White Industries/Kinlin wheelset. Itís easily as fast and comfortable as any of my other bikes, most of which cost many times what the Tempo did.
Thanks Doc, is it difficult to get a 10 speed to fit in there? When I took it out for a spin, I noticed that I ran out of gears too quick.

Tom
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Old 08-10-22, 04:33 PM
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I just put an R7000 2x11 on my recently acquired 1987 Schwinn Circuit. It came as a bare frameset and I had the group saved back for a while. Got a decent set of wheels and spread the axle to 130mm, I was going to leave it at 126 but couldn't quite spread the dropouts manually to insert wheel and didn't want to have to fight it if I got a flat somewhere out on the road. As to the R7000 I have to warn you the front derailleur setup nearly kicked my butt but I finally got it done.

She rides like a dream now.
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Old 08-10-22, 07:14 PM
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Nice pick up,Indytriumph. I donít ride this one nearly enough, but when I do, itís a blast!
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Old 08-10-22, 07:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Indytriumph View Post
Thanks Doc, is it difficult to get a 10 speed to fit in there? When I took it out for a spin, I noticed that I ran out of gears too quick.

Tom
Piece of cake. Itís only 2mm per side, yer thumbs can do the work easily
But there are plenty of 6 speed freewheel,options out there if all you need is smaller cogs.
Many feel that 6X2 is plenty.
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Old 08-10-22, 08:01 PM
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Congratulations! I love tenax Schwinns. Not the world's hottest tubeset but it punches above it's weight in my book. I had a tenax voyager that was just an excellent bike.
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Old 08-10-22, 08:09 PM
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More pics after I gave it a bath and got rid of the many years. I paid $200 for the bike and was thinking it was too much, after cleaning it and riding it I feel like it was a good deal.







worth of dust.
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Old 08-21-22, 04:59 AM
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Hey Doc,
Do you have a Wheelset that you would recommend?

Tom

Originally Posted by rccardr View Post
Congratulations on obtaining one of the finest bikes Schwinn ever produced. Seriously!

They do indeed come with Maillard freewheel hubs and soft-ish Wolber rims. Not a terrible wheelset but not the best, either. You may want to replace them eventually.
The Shimano New 105 (aka 1050) six speed components are bomb-proof. If it were mine, Iíd disassemble the RD and service the pulley wheels as well as the hubs and bottom bracket, simply due to the age of the lubricants therein.
.
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Old 08-21-22, 06:15 AM
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Great-looking bike, in excellent condition!

Looks very much like my '87 Ironman. I wonder...do they ride similar, as well?
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Old 08-21-22, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Indytriumph View Post
Hey Doc,
Do you have a Wheelset that you would recommend?

Tom
Any good midlevel Shimano wheelset will fit the bill. 105 or Tricolor hubs laced to Mavic Open Elite rims would work.
A decent wheelset will probably cost more than you paid for the bike, even if you build it yourself.
Local CL or FB might yield a deal, however.
Shipping can be expensive.
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