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Is it harder to mount standard tyres with tubes on tubeless-ready rims?

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Is it harder to mount standard tyres with tubes on tubeless-ready rims?

Old 06-05-21, 02:51 PM
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fredlord
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Is it harder to mount standard tyres with tubes on tubeless-ready rims?

Hope the question makes sense.

Similarly, if I have a tubeless-ready tyre and tubeless-ready rims, will it be harder to mount that (tubeless-ready) tyre with a tube?

Or, if I want to have the least hassle when changing a tube, should I avoid tubeless-ready rims and tyres altogether?

Sorry for the ugly English, just trying to be clear.
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Old 06-05-21, 02:59 PM
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alcjphil
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I can't imagine using tubeless ready tires on tubeless ready rims with inner tubes. You can usually buy a non tubeless version of the same tire at a much lower cost if you don't want to go tubeless. I have several times installed inner tubes into road tubeless tires when I have flatted with very little trouble, but I have been running road tubeless tires for over 10 years and have a lot of experience mounting them. One thing if you do this: if your tubeless ready rims need rim tape, use the same tape you would use for a tubeless application, the thin tape used for tubeless makes for easier installation of any tire tubeless or not
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Old 06-05-21, 03:01 PM
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I guess it would all come down to how deep the inside of the rim was. Tubes or tubeless, mounting issues would be the same.
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Old 06-05-21, 03:17 PM
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Should be a non-issue, since tubeless-ready rims and tubeless-ready tires should best be used without tubes.

But the answer to the Q in your thread title is typically "no."
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Old 06-05-21, 03:29 PM
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My spouse got a new name-brand bike with tubeless ready rims and regular tires with tubes. She didn't research the specs down to the last detail, and the shop happily ordered the bike without noticing anything wrong. It was the bike maker's standard build for that particular model. I'm not sure how she'd have found out that it was going to be such a nightmare.

The tires are so tight that for all intents and purposes, they cannot be serviced while on a ride. My spouse's hands are just not strong enough, even with good tire levers and a Kool Stop bead jack. She tried another set of tires, they were even worse, we couldn't get the front on at all, and the shop graciously took them back.

This is the kind of thing that makes "casual" cyclists suspicious of the bike industry's gratuitous innovations.
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Old 06-05-21, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Should be a non-issue, since tubeless-ready rims and tubeless-ready tires should best be used without tubes.
Undoubtedly, unless you buy a new bike that comes equipped as tubeless and you'd prefer to go with tubes.
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Old 06-05-21, 07:59 PM
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Iíve never had an issues with standard tires on tubeless ready rims.

Also never had an issue with tubeless-ready tires on non tubeless rims.

Also never had an issue putting a tube in a tubeless reay tire on a tubeless ready rim. Many new bikes come stock this way.

That said, In have no experience with tubeless anything with tires under 35mm. All my experience in this regard is with gravel and mtb tires.
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Old 06-05-21, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
You can usually buy a non tubeless version of the same tire at a much lower cost if you don't want to go tubeless.
You have an example of that?

In all the cases I know of a tire being available in both TR and non-TR, the latter is a lower tier version (different casing, tread compound, maybe wire bead.

But my experience is with gravel and MTB TR. I have never looked into skinnier road tires.

The exemption is when a company has just added TR to a tire, you might find the previous non-TR version on sale.
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Old 06-06-21, 12:11 AM
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Yes, I have found it a little bit harder to fit standard tyres onto 'tubeless ready' rims but I must qualify this by adding that this is on two Shimano wheelsets both purchased about 3 years ago
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Old 06-06-21, 01:36 AM
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Not all tubeless tire and rim combinations are the same. Some are not too difficult. Some are nearly impossible.

If you have a narrow rim, and add a tube into the process. With a tire that is very hard to fit, you are much more likely to damage the tube while trying to fit it.

There have been a range of different responses, because different people have different tube and rim combinations.

Unless someone makes a list with the brands of tire and tube combinations, you may be lucky or unlucky.

I also consider the cost. If you run tubes, and tires designed to have tubes are less expensive, I would use them.
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Old 06-06-21, 05:25 AM
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I had a lot of trouble last year. Got a puncture. Sealant was dried out thanks to user neglect. Could not get the tire properly seated at the valve stem area with a tube in it. Just wasnít enough room. Front tire wobble all the way back to the car. Had the same problem on the rear a few years ago. On the flip side, I had no trouble with a different type of tire many years ago when I got a puncture that would not seal above 60 psi.


I guess it depends on the types of rim and tire.
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Old 06-06-21, 07:08 AM
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Originally Posted by fredlord View Post
Undoubtedly, unless you buy a new bike that comes equipped as tubeless and you'd prefer to go with tubes.
Will your new bike come already set up as tubeless with sealant, etc? If so it might be a little messy to switch to tubes. Worst case would be buying a pair of tires that are easier to mount, maybe trial and error. Anyway, not a reason to pass on a bike you otherwise like, IMO.
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Old 06-06-21, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Will your new bike come already set up as tubeless with sealant, etc?
I bought a new bike ten days ago with tubeless ready tyres (Riddlers) but which came with tubes. I'm trying to decide which way I'll go re puncture protection vs preserving ride quality.
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Old 06-06-21, 07:27 AM
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You might experiment at home, see how easily your tires mount (or not) so you know what to expect on the road.
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Old 06-06-21, 01:39 PM
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An example of tubed and tubeless versions of the same tire is the continental gp 5000.

https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...d-prix-5000-tl

Most brands will have tubed and tubeless versions of their top of the line tire.
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Old 06-06-21, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post
An example of tubed and tubeless versions of the same tire is the continental gp 5000.

https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...d-prix-5000-tl

Most brands will have tubed and tubeless versions of their top of the line tire.
Aren't the tubeless only version GP5000s only available in 25c where other sizes are just tubeless ready?
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Old 06-06-21, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by fredlord View Post
Hope the question makes sense.

Similarly, if I have a tubeless-ready tyre and tubeless-ready rims, will it be harder to mount that (tubeless-ready) tyre with a tube?

Or, if I want to have the least hassle when changing a tube, should I avoid tubeless-ready rims and tyres altogether?

Sorry for the ugly English, just trying to be clear.
So not sure any of this was answered, but here's what I think:
1. Yes, a standard (non-TL) tire will typically be more difficult to mount on a TL rim than it would be on a non-TL rim.
2. Yes, I believe mounting a TLR tire with a tube, will be harder than a non-TL tire with a tube, even on a TL rim. At least there must be some reason that a TLR tire weighs more than it's Non-TL counterpart, and I imagine that's due to sturdier/stiffer construction?
3. Yes, in general. I'm sure there's a TLR tire and Rim that's easier to mount than some combinations of NonTL tire and standard rims, but the odds are in your favor that for ease of mounting, a NonTL tire and tube will be easier to get onto a NonTLR rim.

But as suggested or mentioned, there are always outliers and no guarantees.
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Old 06-06-21, 05:06 PM
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Originally Posted by MrWasabi View Post
Aren't the tubeless only version GP5000s only available in 25c where other sizes are just tubeless ready?
No. https://www.biketiresdirect.com/product/continental-grand-prix-5000-tl-road-tire?fltr=&sg=507

https://www.biketiresdirect.com/product/continental-grand-prix-5000-road-tire?fltr=&sg=500

Last edited by DaveSSS; 06-06-21 at 05:21 PM.
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Old 06-06-21, 07:04 PM
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This question is damn near moot - there aren't many current wheels that aren't tubeless ready, and even some of those still have the tubeless ready rim bed shape (like some of the new Rovals). IOW, your wheels, in all likelihood, will be tubeless ready. With halfway decent technique, it's not going to be a problem (the vast majority of the time).

As far as deciding on whether to go tubeless or tubed - look at your flat frequency and decide if that's more of a pain in the ass than the tubeless maintenance. If I flatted once per year, I personally wouldn't bother with tubeless, but my flat frequency was much higher than that and the move to tubeless has been a happy one.
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Old 06-07-21, 04:09 AM
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Originally Posted by fredlord View Post
I bought a new bike ten days ago with tubeless ready tyres (Riddlers) but which came with tubes. I'm trying to decide which way I'll go re puncture protection vs preserving ride quality.
If it aint broke, don't fix it.

I suggest, wait until you need to do something. For example, like having a puncture. Until then, you can think about what you prefer. You may even go with one of each when that happens, and see what you think.
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Old 06-07-21, 04:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
You have an example of that?

In all the cases I know of a tire being available in both TR and non-TR, the latter is a lower tier version (different casing, tread compound, maybe wire bead.

But my experience is with gravel and MTB TR. I have never looked into skinnier road tires.

The exemption is when a company has just added TR to a tire, you might find the previous non-TR version on sale.
Conti GP 5000 tires. TL cost more than TT tires. Though my TT tires fit so tight Iíd bet I could run them tubeless.

To answer another question. The GP 5000 in 23mm look like they only come in tube type. I tried 25mm tires and early GP5000 tires ran large. Latest set closer to true size.

Last edited by biker128pedal; 06-07-21 at 04:39 AM.
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Old 06-07-21, 02:01 PM
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what is the advantage of a tubeless tire? I went by a biker who was walking his bike. He said he had a flat and I told him I have a patch kit. He said no thanks these tires are tubeless. I thought well....he must regret that.
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Old 06-07-21, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by coffeesnob View Post
what is the advantage of a tubeless tire?
If maintained properly, they can eliminate the vast majority of routine flats. If you don't maintain them or if you're not subject to routine flats, there's not much reason to run tubeless, IMO.
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Old 06-07-21, 07:41 PM
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In the last year I have probably done at least 30+ tire changes. On most of wheels I can just use my hands to put on the tire or just a lever with just a little force. This is for road and gravel tires. I have not done any mountain bike tires.


On one bike I require this tool. Some tire/wheel combos or just PITA.

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Old 06-08-21, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
If maintained properly, they can eliminate the vast majority of routine flats. If you don't maintain them or if you're not subject to routine flats, there's not much reason to run tubeless, IMO.
what is a routine flat?
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