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Trek Domane - possibly destroyed in strange incident

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Trek Domane - possibly destroyed in strange incident

Old 06-16-20, 07:14 PM
  #51  
jfranci3
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I really doubt you cracked the frame. Maybe some paint on the seat stay. You might need a new front derailleur mount, derailleur hanger, FD, RD, Chain, and cables. What gear were you in? If low, it's possible it's the bike shops fault, as the rear derailleur could have it the wheel spoke.
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Old 06-16-20, 08:06 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by jfranci3 View Post
I really doubt you cracked the frame. Maybe some paint on the seat stay. You might need a new front derailleur mount, derailleur hanger, FD, RD, Chain, and cables. What gear were you in? If low, it's possible it's the bike shops fault, as the rear derailleur could have it the wheel spoke.
I get you don't want to read the whole thread but at least pay attention to the original post.

First Jungleland said he ran over a stick. How can this be the bike shop's fault? Second the LBS who actually looked at the frame believes the frame is cracked and I think that has more validity than your guessing it didn't crack the frame.

Sorry this happened to you Jungleland.

The whole thing boils down to crap happens, unfortunately this crap happened to Jungleland. It can all be fixed but it is an expense that will hurt and the time that it will take to have it sorted out doesn't help.

Originally Posted by Jungleland View Post
I have a new Trek Domane SL4 that I have only but about 600 or so miles on. I was riding on Saturday, going about 20mph on a paved road with a nice shoulder and hit a small stick that I didn't even see. Somehow the stick got flung up in my rear derailleur causing the entire thing to break in half sending one half of it into my front gears and destroying that as well. Honestly, I can't wrap my head around how it happened. On first inspection by my LBS, it ruined my rear wheel and may have cracked the frame. My LBS indicated that Trek would most likely not cover it either so I am crushed at having my 1st ever road bike possibly being totaled right off the bat and being 100% out of pocket. Chalk it up under "stuff happens"?
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Old 06-16-20, 08:25 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by blakcloud View Post
I get you don't want to read the whole thread but at least pay attention to the original post.

First Jungleland said he ran over a stick. How can this be the bike shop's fault? Second the LBS who actually looked at the frame believes the frame is cracked and I think that has more validity than your guessing it didn't crack the frame.

Sorry this happened to you Jungleland.

The whole thing boils down to crap happens, unfortunately this crap happened to Jungleland. It can all be fixed but it is an expense that will hurt and the time that it will take to have it sorted out doesn't help.

1) I don't see the stick. He didn't' actually see the stick while riding. I don't see any bent spokes. I'm suspecting he's not sure it was actually the stick. I had a derailleur get pulled into my spokes once, and it was exactly like a stick hitting them. I only mentioned the shop because thats just one of many possibilities.
2) I don't see a picture of any frame damage other than the braze on. I'm thinking some folks are just overly cautious....the LBS in this case. The seatstays and chainstays are pretty tough, everything else there is designed to fail before the frame. They mentioned the downtube crack, which would be very odd. Maybe the frame had a pre-existing condition.

Last edited by jfranci3; 06-16-20 at 08:30 PM.
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Old 06-16-20, 08:48 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by jfranci3 View Post
1) I don't see the stick. He didn't' actually see the stick while riding. I don't see any bent spokes. I'm suspecting he's not sure it was actually the stick. I had a derailleur get pulled into my spokes once, and it was exactly like a stick hitting them. I only mentioned the shop because thats just one of many possibilities.
2) I don't see a picture of any frame damage other than the braze on. I'm thinking some folks are just overly cautious....the LBS in this case. The seatstays and chainstays are pretty tough, everything else there is designed to fail before the frame. They mentioned the downtube crack, which would be very odd. Maybe the frame had a pre-existing condition.
What ever makes you sleep at night. I have more faith in the OP's version of events and the LBS's than your wild conjectures.
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Old 06-16-20, 09:56 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
How would that have snapped an RD cage? I'm not seeing it.
It is absolutely impossible to say anything one way or the other without a power meter.
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Old 06-17-20, 04:59 AM
  #56  
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There is absolutely NOTHING as entertaining as a Bike Forums crash reconstruction thread There can't be any "structural engineer" positions open in the USA given the number of people on the internet working in the trade.

Last edited by nomadmax; 06-17-20 at 07:11 AM.
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Old 06-17-20, 05:23 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
It is absolutely impossible to say anything one way or the other without a power meter.
This would have earned you more credit if a) you hadn't already responded to the question and b) it hadn't taken you 16+ hours to come up with something "snappy." But kudos on the effort.
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Old 06-17-20, 05:24 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by jfranci3 View Post
1) I don't see the stick. He didn't' actually see the stick while riding. I don't see any bent spokes. I'm suspecting he's not sure it was actually the stick. I had a derailleur get pulled into my spokes once, and it was exactly like a stick hitting them. I only mentioned the shop because thats just one of many possibilities.
2) I don't see a picture of any frame damage other than the braze on. I'm thinking some folks are just overly cautious....the LBS in this case. The seatstays and chainstays are pretty tough, everything else there is designed to fail before the frame. They mentioned the downtube crack, which would be very odd. Maybe the frame had a pre-existing condition.
That's an interesting thought that it wasn't a stick and completely plausible. Everything happened so damned fast, I am sure my brain went to, what I thought, was the most likely scenario (never knew a derailleur could get pulled into the spokes).
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Old 06-17-20, 06:11 AM
  #59  
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A shifter doesn't magically get pulled into spokes for no reason. It gets pulled into the spokes WHILE SHIFTING. If you were shifting to the largest cog, and the derailleur limit screws are off or the the hanger is bent then there is the possibility of the derailleur hitting the spokes and being pulled. This can only happen while shifting. Again you would have been in the second to last cog, shifted to the largest and then bang. All this would have happened at the same time, you would have noticed. Were you shifting when it happened?

In the end you have taken the bike to the Trek dealership and they are pushing for you which is good. There are other solutions but I wouldn't go there until I had to. Good luck, I hope it works out for you.
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Old 06-17-20, 06:45 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by blakcloud View Post
Again you would have been in the second to last cog, shifted to the largest and then bang.
At 20mph.
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Old 06-17-20, 06:55 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
This would have earned you more credit if a) you hadn't already responded to the question and b) it hadn't taken you 16+ hours to come up with something "snappy." But kudos on the effort.
The forum is more enjoyable when you don't see his comments.

#ignore
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Old 06-22-20, 11:12 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by eduskator View Post
If TI was ''really the way to go'' Pros would all use it. Last time I checked, it was not the case. Still a great metal though!
Note that pros are concerned about performance above all considerations, in particular they prioritize performance over the potential cost of replacing a damaged bike with a new one. Money is no object when you're going for the gold, eh?

The rest of us, not so much.
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Old 06-22-20, 11:16 AM
  #63  
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Same thing happened to me with a twig on the side of the road that i drove over. The rear derailleur broke, the chain broke, one spoke broke. The steel mountain bike was fine after repairs.
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Old 06-22-20, 11:36 AM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
Could that have possibly caused the accident, and the stick is a red herring?
Did the bike come without the "dork disk" installed? Had it been, the RD might have bounced off the dork disk instead of lodging in the spokes, avoiding much of the damage. Just sayin'.
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Old 06-22-20, 12:00 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by drewguy View Post
Did the bike come without the "dork disk" installed? Had it been, the RD might have bounced off the dork disk instead of lodging in the spokes, avoiding much of the damage. Just sayin'.
you have an awful lot of faith in the dork disc.

I build over 150 bikes a month, and about 20% of them have dork discs that didn’t make it through shipping.
The bike is fine otherwise, and the box shows no signs of rough treatment. If the dork disc is this fragile, what make you think it will actually keep the bike from getting damaged?
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Old 06-22-20, 01:19 PM
  #66  
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I worked at a shop during the original mountain bike boom of the 1980's. Bikes didn't have replaceable derailleur hangers back then. We were constantly bending the tabs back oh so gently from sticks in the der. Sometimes they would crack and we would have to have the local frame builder put in a new dropout. Which is now the reason why all mountain bikes have replaceable tabs now. Not as common on the road, but stick in the der is always a bad thing.
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Old 06-22-20, 01:42 PM
  #67  
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So much needless conjecture about an event that even the OP is not sure what happened. Whatever occurred, that is tough luck and a sad way to start with a new bike. The bike shop should be advocating for you. Personally, I would not leave it up to just the bike shop. I would be contacting Trek myself, in addition. I hope the OP has an end result that is satisfactory to them.
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Old 06-22-20, 02:12 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by burnthesheep View Post
Not to start stuff, but I've seen bikes not setup properly from the shop drop chains and have drivetrain issues like this happen early. Some sucking the RD into the wheels and ruining the bike. So, the stick could be a red herring as stated above. Again, not to start stuff........but I've seen so many folks show up on group rides on a brand new bike from the shop have a ride littered with "mechanicals".
This was one of my thoughts. Occasionally I think about removing the guard between the cassette and the wheel but then think about the implications and leave it in place.
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Old 06-22-20, 02:23 PM
  #69  
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OP: I am sympathetic. However:
- This is why a local bike shop here recommends against anything carbon fiber, frame or components, for consumer bikes that are not raced at a competitive level. They are fragile and difficult to repair, but mostly fragile, other frame materials probably would have shrugged this off. Carbon fiber itself is very strong but is contained in a plastic matrix and there is good "global" strength and stiffness, but thin wall thickness, which adds up to poor "local" strength and stiffness.
- "Ruined" rear wheel? If there is a bad kink in the rim, either radially or laterally, yes. A small amount of lateral runout without a bend in the rim itself may be a result of spoke stretching alone, and if no damage to the rim or hub, may be corrected with a good retrue. Optimally, bring all the spokes down to zero tension, then slowly back up to tension by first cranking the exact same number of turns on each spoke. Those that take a lot more turns to tension up may be stretched too much and should be replaced. You can also totally unlace the wheel and measure the spokes but that is a lot more effort.
- By the way, this is why bikes have a "dork disc" between the cluster and spokes, to prevent the derailleur alone from doing this damage with no sticks. You should put yours back on or buy one. The clear plastic ones are not very noticeable. Yeah, I used to pull mine off too, until I realized why it is there and then put it back on to all my bikes.

Like you said, difficult to see the damage to the frame. Could you tell us where or highlight the areas?

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Old 06-22-20, 02:31 PM
  #70  
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Yowee, having your new Domane wrecked like that! I once had a similar incident in which the metal wire/rod of one of those landscape flags, that was lying flat on the road, popped up when my front tire rolled over it. Got pulled into my rear derailleur which seized, bending the hell out of the integrated derailleur hanger on my steel Coppi (sweet ride), trashing the derailleur and sawing through a number of spokes on the rear wheel. Rebuilt the wheel, got a shop to realign the derailleur hanger, slapped on a new derailleur and she was back in business. I can see how the same incident on a CF fame might have ended much worse. Good luck getting yours fixed/replaced.
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Old 06-22-20, 04:25 PM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by dmorge View Post
Same thing happened to me with a twig on the side of the road that i drove over. The rear derailleur broke, the chain broke, one spoke broke. The steel mountain bike was fine after repairs.
So you drove your mountain bike over a twig and your frame was ok because it was steel?
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Old 06-22-20, 04:54 PM
  #72  
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Old 06-22-20, 07:42 PM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by deacon mark View Post
This is why Titanium is really the way to go, that to me should not be so fragile.
Situations like this make me think the same way. I'm considering getting a road bike for a nice 29 mi. ride I do with 2 good hills, I have a Specialized Stumpjumper with road tires on it, and fantasize about riding a lighter bike, stories like this make me nervous about CF. Sorry for the OPs troubles.
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Old 06-22-20, 10:21 PM
  #74  
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I ride steel.

However, I think this is a freak accident, and not something to use to dismiss carbon fiber.

I screwed up trimming some carbon fiber mountain bars, and eventually decided to toss the handlebars. To prevent someone dumpster-diving them, I decided to break it up with a sledge hammer, one I use with a steel wedge for splitting hardwoods, like madrone and oak. I was unable to damage the bars at all, despite repeatedly slamming them with the sledge. I wound up having to saw it in half (which is murder on hacksaw blades, too, btw).
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Old 06-22-20, 10:36 PM
  #75  
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The tech is truly impressive. I saw a video on how a carbon fiber frame was made and it's truly amazing how strong it is. Thanks for an interesting post.
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