Go Back  Bike Forums > The Lounge > Foo
Reload this Page >

Songs from American Graffiti

Notices
Foo Light hearted off-topic chit chat with no general subject.

Songs from American Graffiti

Old 06-23-21, 11:38 PM
  #26  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Maybe Baby

"Maybe Baby" is a rock-and-roll song written by Buddy Holly and the producer Norman Petty, and recorded by Holly and the Crickets in 1957. The single, credited to the Crickets, was a Top 40 hit in the U.S., the UK, and Canada.

The rather simple lyrics are augmented by a twangy percussive accompaniment, characteristic of rockabilly, which is especially effective in the 8-bar instrumental introduction and the short conclusion.

"Maybe Baby" was recorded at Tinker Air Force Base in Midwest City, Oklahoma in September 29, 1957, while Buddy Holly and The Crickets were on a tour (and played that same night, at Oklahoma City Municipal Auditorium with the Show Of Stars '57). Jerry Allison from The Crickets personally remembers that the song, along with three others, was recorded at Tinker Air Force Base. Graham Pugh, a Buddy Holly researcher from the Oklahoma City area, also has seen airplane tickets documenting the fact that Buddy Holly and The Crickets landed at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City on September 28, 1957.

Norman Petty (May 25, 1927 – August 15, 1984) was an American musician and record producer who is best known for his association with Buddy Holly and the Crickets, who recorded in his studio.

Petty served as Buddy Holly's producer and also as his first manager until late 1958. Many of Holly's best and most polished efforts were produced at the Clovis studio. After Holly's death, Petty was put in charge of overdubbing unfinished Holly recordings by request of the Holley family (Buddy's parents) and demos, which had charting success overseas.

Buddy Holly & The Crickets version


Jimmy Gilmer & The Fireballs version


Gallery version


Buddy Holly – Royal Philharmonic Orchestra


The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band version


The Rockhoppers version


The Outsiders version


Bobby Vee version


Al Paget Sextet version


Skeeter Davis version


Paul McCartney version


Tommy Allsup version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 10:43 PM
  #27  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Ya Ya

"Ya Ya" is a song by Lee Dorsey. The song was written by Dorsey, C. L. Blast, Bobby Robinson, and Morris Levy. Levy's participation in the writing has been called into question; the Flashback release of the single lists only Dorsey and Blast as writers, as do the liner notes to the American Graffiti soundtrack.

The song was inspired by a children's nursery rhyme, and includes session guitar player Jimmy Spruill on it.

According to author Mark Lewisohn in The Complete Beatles Chronicles (p. 365), the Beatles regularly performed "Ya Ya", live from 1961 to 1962 in Hamburg, Liverpool and elsewhere. John Lennon was always the lead vocalist on this number but no recorded version is known to exist.

However, Tony Sheridan, the Beatles' close associate, recorded a live version of the song for Polydor Records which was released in October 1962 on the A-side of a German extended play. This 45RPM is credited to Tony Sheridan & "The Beat Brothers" who are often wrongly believed to be the Beatles. But the fledgling British group had no involvement in recording this track although "Sweet Georgia Brown", included on this disc, is indeed recorded by them.

Lee Dorsey version


The Beatles with Tony Sheridan version


Ike & Tina Turner version


Francis Cabrel, Slim Batteux, Paul Personne, Claude Engel version


Ryan Foret & Foret Tradition version


Mark Wayne Rhythm & Blues Band version


Chubby Carrier & The Bayou Swamp Band version


Tommy James & The Shondells version


Rufus Thomas version


Steve Alaimo version


Keely Smith version


Joey Dee & The Starliters version


Craig Duncan – Cajun Country version


John Lennon version


Buckwheat Zydeco version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 06-26-21, 06:09 AM
  #28  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: The Great Pretender

"The Great Pretender" is a popular song recorded by The Platters, with Tony Williams on lead vocals, and released as a single in November 1955. The words and music were written by Buck Ram, the Platters' manager and producer who was a successful songwriter before moving into producing and management. The song reached No. 1 on Billboard's Top 100, and No. 5 on the UK charts.

The song has been covered by a number of singers, most notably by Freddie Mercury, whose version reached No. 4 on the UK charts. Sam Cooke's cover of the song is believed to have inspired Chrissie Hynde to name her band The Pretenders.

The manager of The Platters Buck Ram said that he wrote the song in about 20 minutes in the washroom of the Flamingo Hotel in order to have a follow up to the success of "Only You (And You Alone)". Ram had boasted to Bob Shad that he had an even better song than "Only You", and when pressed by Shad on the name of the song, and Ram quickly replied "The Great Pretender". He said the song would be a hit even before he had written the song to go with the title. The song was recorded by The Platters and released in November 1955. Plas Johnson played tenor saxophone on the recording. It became the best-selling R&B song in January 1956, and reached No. 1 on the Top 100 chart on Billboard in February 1956. It was also the 12th best-selling singles of 1956.

The Platters version


Sam Cooke version


Freddie Mercury version


Dolly Parton version


Carol Fran version


Bobby Vinton version


Roy Orbison version


Kathy Young version


The Mighty Echoes version


Sonny Wilson version


Jimmy Parkinson version


Lester Bowie version


The Hampton String Quartet version

Craig Duncan & The Appalachian Orchestra version


Robben Ford, Bill Frisell, and J. Anthony Granelli version


That High And Lonesome Sound version


Fernandoz version


Last edited by Garfield Cat; 06-26-21 at 06:16 AM.
Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 06-26-21, 10:22 PM
  #29  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Ain't That A Shame

"Ain't That a Shame" is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino's recording of the song, originally stated as "Ain't It a Shame", released by Imperial Records in 1955, was a hit, eventually selling a million copies. It reached number 1 on the Billboard R&B chart and number 10 on the pop chart. The song is ranked number 438 on Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list.

This recording was included in the debut Fats Domino album Rock and Rollin' with Fats Domino (1956) and next in the compilation Fats Domino Swings (12,000,000 Records) (1958). Later in 1963 the recording has been overdubbed by vocal chorus for the album Let's Dance with Domino (1963). In 1983 Fats Domino re-recorded the song; this recording was included in his last album Alive and Kickin' (2006) under the title "Ain't That a Shame 2000".

The song gained national fame after being covered by Pat Boone. Domino's version soon became more popular, bringing his music to the mass market a half-dozen years after his first recording, "The Fat Man". After "Ain't That a Shame", mainstream artists began covering Domino's songs. Teresa Brewer, for instance, performed Domino's version of the folk song "Bo Weevil".

The song has also been covered by The Four Seasons (1963), John Lennon (1975) and, most notably, Cheap Trick (1978), among others.

Fats Domino version


The Southlanders version


Connie Francis version


Windwell and Handsome and Gretyl version


George Benson version


Paul McCartney version


Hank Williams Jr with Mike Curb Congregation version


The Four Seasons version


Pat Boone version


Davell Crawford version


8 To the Bar version


Ike & Tina Turner version


Little Junior Parker version


Lonnie Lester & Chuck Danzy version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 06-27-21, 05:27 AM
  #30  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Johnny b. Goode

"Johnny B. Goode" is a 1958 rock-and-roll song written and first recorded by Chuck Berry. The song was a major hit, peaking at number two on Billboard magazine's Hot R&B Sides chart and number eight on its Hot 100 chart.

"Johnny B. Goode" is considered one of the most recognizable songs in the history of popular music. Credited as "the first rock & roll hit about rock & roll stardom", it has been recorded by many other artists and has received several honors and accolades, including being ranked seventh on Rolling Stone's list of the "500 Greatest Songs of All Time" and included as one of the 27 songs on the Voyager Golden Record, a collection of music, images, and sounds designed to serve as a record of humanity.

Written by Berry in 1955, the song is about an illiterate "country boy" from the New Orleans area, who plays a guitar "just like ringing a bell", and who might one day have his "name in lights". Berry acknowledged that the song is partly autobiographical and that the original lyrics referred to Johnny as a "colored boy", but he changed it to "country boy" to ensure radio play. As well as suggesting that the guitar player is good, the title hints at autobiographic elements, because Berry was born at 2520 Goode Avenue, in St. Louis.

The song was initially inspired by Johnnie Johnson, the regular piano player in Berry's band, but developed into a song mainly about Berry himself. Johnson played on many recordings by Berry, but for the Chess recording session Lafayette Leake played the piano, along with Willie Dixon on bass and Fred Below on drums. The session was produced by Leonard and Phil Chess.

The opening guitar riff of "Johnny B. Goode" borrows from the opening single-note solo on Louis Jordan's "Ain't That Just Like a Woman" (1946), played by guitarist Carl Hogan.

A cover version is included in the film Back to the Future, when the lead character Marty McFly plays it at a high school dance. Actor Michael J. Fox explained his approach to "incorporate all the characteristics and mannerisms and quirks of my favourite guitarists, so a Pete Townshend windmill, and Jimi Hendrix behind the back, and a Chuck Berry duckwalk. And we worked all that in." Reviewer Gregory Wakeman described it as "one of the best musical performances in movie history".

Chuck Berry version


The Beatles version


Jo Ann Campbell version


Johnny Rivers version


Jerry Lee Lewis version


The Beach Boys version


Buck Owens and the Buckaroos version


Donna Fargo version


John Denver version


The Coad Sisters version


The Rivieras version


Bill Blacks Combo version


Monalisa Twins version


Tony DeSare version


Marty McFly version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 06-29-21, 01:02 AM
  #31  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: I Only Have Eyes For You

"I Only Have Eyes for You" is a romantic love song by composer Harry Warren and lyricist Al Dubin, written for the film Dames (1934) when Dick Powell introduced it. Several successful recordings of the song were made in 1934 and later there were charted versions by The Flamingos (1959) and Art Garfunkel (1975).

Dick Powell (Movie – Dames) version


Eddy Duchin & Orchestra version


The Flamingos version


Warren Vaché Quintet version


Louis Armstrong version


Billie Holiday version


Jumaane Smith – Naturally 7 version


Clare Teal version


Boyz Nite Out version


Patti Austin version


Tony Bennett version


Lena Horne version


Mark Murphy version


Joe Williams version


The Swallows version


Frank Sinatra – The Ken Lane Singers version


Herb Alpert – Lani Hall version


Melanie C version


Art Garfunkel version


Carmen McRae version


Billy Paul version


Rachael Price version


The Doo Wop Project version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 06-29-21, 11:48 PM
  #32  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Get A Job

"Get a Job" is a song by the Silhouettes released in November 1957. It was written by Earl Beal, Ray Edwards, Bill Horton, & Rick Lewis.

It reached the number one spot on the Billboard pop and R&B singles charts in February 1958, and was later included in Robert Christgau's "Basic Record Library" of 1950s and 1960s recordings, published in Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981). The song celebrates the virtues of securing gainful employment.

"When I was in the service in the early 1950s and didn't come home and go to work, my mother said 'get a job' and basically that's where the song came from," said tenor Richard Lewis, who wrote the lyrics. The four members of the group shared the credit, jointly creating the "sha na na" and "dip dip dip dip" hooks later imitated by other doo-wop groups.

It was recorded at Robinson Recording Laboratories in Philadelphia in October 1957. Rollee McGill played the saxophone break, and the arranger was Howard Biggs. Intended as the B-side to "I Am Lonely", "Get a Job" was initially released on Kae Williams' Junior label; Williams, who was also a Philadelphia disc-jockey, was the Silhouettes' manager. Doug Moody, an executive at Ember Records, acquired the rights to the song for that label, where it was licensed for national distribution.

In early 1958, the Silhouettes performed "Get a Job" several times on American Bandstand and once on The Dick Clark Show, appearances that contributed to the song's success by exposing it to a large audience. Ultimately the single sold more than a million copies.

The Silhouettes version


James Taylor version


The Mills Brothers version


The Boppers version


Vito & The Salutations version


Meet The Raisins version


The Delltones version


Neil Young & Crazy Horse version


The Hampton Rock String Quartet version


Sha Na Na version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 06-30-21, 04:40 PM
  #33  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: To The Aisle

"To the Aisle" is a 1957 song recorded by The Five Satins with songwriting credits to group members Jim Freeman, Jessie Murphy, Bill Baker, Tommy Killebrew, and John Brown. The arrangement included an alto saxophone and an oboe played in harmony during the bridge and the oboe at the song's closing, very unusual for the time.

The Five Satins version


Carla Thomas version


Nora Anour version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-01-21, 04:41 PM
  #34  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song; Do You Want To Dance

"Do You Want to Dance" is a song written by American singer Bobby Freeman and recorded by him in 1958. It reached number No. 5 on the United States Billboard Top 100 Sides pop chart and No. 2 on the Billboard R&B chart. Cliff Richard and the Shadows' version of the song reached No. 2 in the United Kingdom in 1962, despite being a B-side. The Beach Boys' version reached No. 12 as "Do You Wanna Dance?" in the United States in 1965, and a 1972 cover by Bette Midler ("Do You Want to Dance?") reached No. 17.

A different song called "Do You Wanna Dance?" was a UK hit for Barry Blue in 1973.

San Francisco-born teenager Bobby Freeman had been a member of doo-wop groups the Romancers and the Vocaleers. When asked by a local DJ if he had written any songs, he wrote several and recorded them as solo demos. These included "Do You Want to Dance", which was heard by a visiting record label executive, Mortimer Palitz of Jubilee Records. He signed Freeman to the label, and had the original recording overdubbed in New York by session musicians including guitarist Billy Mure. Released on the Jubilee subsidiary label Josie, "Do You Want to Dance" quickly rose to number 5 on the pop chart and number 2 on the R&B chart in early 1958, when Freeman was still only 17. Contrary to some reports, Jerry Garcia did not play on the record.[5]

The song was included in Robert Christgau's "Basic Record Library" of 1950s and 1960s recordings, published in Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981).

Bobby Freeman version


Cliff Richard & The Shadows version


Rachael MacFarlane version


Sonny & Cher version


Bobby Vee version


Andrew Suvalsky version


Sam Fazio version


We Five version


Johnny Rivers version


The Mamas & The Papas version


The Beach Boys version


The 4 Seasons version


Del Shannon version


Bette Midler version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-01-21, 10:52 PM
  #35  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Party Doll

"Party Doll" is a 1957 rock 'n' roll song written by Buddy Knox and Jimmy Bowen. It was performed by Buddy Knox with the Rhythm Orchids, recorded in April 1956, and it became a hit on the Roulette label.

Buddy Knox was a teenager living near Happy, Texas, in 1948 when he wrote the original verses of "Party Doll" behind a haystack on his family farm. While attending college at West Texas State University, he and two college friends, Jimmy Bowen and Don Lanier, traveled to Clovis, New Mexico, to record the song at the studio of Norman Petty. Knox's sister and two of her friends, Iraene Potts of Amarillo and a neighbor, sang background vocals on the song and a girl from the marching band of Clovis High School was recruited to play cymbal. After pressing copies of the record, a DJ in Amarillo began playing "Party Doll" in 1956 and it soon became a regional hit. After being contacted by Roulette Records in New York City, the song was distributed around the U.S. and became a chart-topping hit, spending a week at No. 1 on the Top 100 chart, the precursor to the Billboard Hot 100, in March 1957. Jerry Allison, drummer for The Crickets (who also recorded for Petty at Clovis), stated in an interview that the drum on Party Doll (which he said was played on a cardboard box) was the inspiration for the drum sound he used for "Not Fade Away".

Buddy Knox version


Jhonny Maestro & The Crests version


The Lucky Tomblin Band version


Teddie Palmer version


Mayf Nutter version


The Hullabaloos version


Don Ellis version


Barry Frank And Michael Stewart Quartett version


Steve Lawrence version


Bobby Vee & The Crickets version



Leroy Van **** version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-03-21, 06:10 AM
  #36  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Come Go With Me

"Come Go With Me" is a song written by C. E. Quick (a.k.a. Clarence Quick), an original member (bass vocalist) of the American doo-wop vocal group The Del-Vikings. The song was originally recorded by The Del-Vikings in 1956 and was released on Fee Bee Records.

Norman Wright was the lead vocalist on this song. When the group signed with Dot Records in 1957, the song became a hit, peaking at No. 4 on the US Billboard Hot 100. It also reached #2 on the R&B chart.

Written in just five minutes, "Come Go with Me" was recorded in the basement of Pittsburgh disc jockey Barry Kaye.

The song was later featured in the films American Graffiti (1973), Diner (1982), Stand by Me (1986), Joe Versus the Volcano (1990), and Set It Up (2018). It was included in Robert Christgau's "Basic Record Library" of 1950s and 1960s recordings, published in Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981). It sold over one million copies and was awarded a gold disc.

Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song No. 449 on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

The Del-Vikings version


What’s On Tap version


Craig Duncan & The Appalachian Orchestra version


The Alley Cats version


Sugar N’ Spice version


The Roommates version


Sunny Gale version


The Beach Boys version


David John – The Jordanaires version


MC6 version


Tennessee & Pink Ladies version


4:2: Five version


The Federals version


The Fleetwoods version


Dion version


The Orlons version


Pahinui Brothers version


Street Corner Renaissance version


The Tokens version


Maurice Williams & The Zodiacs version


Last edited by Garfield Cat; 07-03-21 at 06:21 AM.
Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-05-21, 11:57 PM
  #37  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: You're Sixteen

"You're Sixteen" is a song written by the Sherman Brothers (Robert B. Sherman and Richard M. Sherman). It was first performed by American rockabilly singer Johnny Burnette, whose version peaked at number eight on the US Billboard Hot 100 in December 1960 and number 3 in the UK in 1961.

Johnny Burnett version


Ringo Starr version


Daniel O’Donnell version


Marco da Silva version


OC Times version


Los Sonor version


Bobby Stevens version


Gary Lewis & The Playboys


Frank Rose version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-06-21, 09:29 AM
  #38  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Love Potent No 9

"Love Potion No. 9" is a song written in 1959 by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. It was originally performed by the Clovers, who took it to number 23 on the US as well as R&B charts that year.

The song was recorded by the Searchers in 1964. Their version reached number three on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and number two on Cash Box during the winter of 1965.

Herb Alpert and The Tijuana Brass did an instrumental version (side 2, track 1) on his 1965 album Whipped Cream and Other Delights.

The Coasters released a version in December 1971 with "D. W. Washburn" on the B-side. It reached No. 76 on the Billboard Pop chart and No. 96 on the Cash Box chart.

The song describes a man seeking help to find love. He enlists the help of a gypsy who determines, by means of palmistry, that he needs "love potion number 9". The potion, an aphrodisiac, causes him to fall in love with everything he sees, kissing whatever is in front of him, eventually kissing a policeman on the street corner, who breaks his bottle of love potion.

In one recorded version of the ending of the song, the Clovers used the alternative lyrics:

I had so much fun that I'm going back again,

I wonder what'll happen with Love Potion Number Ten?

The narrator describes himself as being "a flop with chicks … since 1956"; later recordings of the song have often changed the year to suit the year of recording or the age of the performer. An exception is the Australian alternative rock band Tlot Tlot's recording, which leaves the year in the song as 1956. It also uses the alternative "Love Potion No. 10" lyrics. The recording by the Searchers also leaves the year as 1956.

The song was the basic premise of the 1992 film of the same name starring Sandra Bullock and Tate Donovan.

The Clovers version


The Searchers version


The Coasters version


Neil Diamond version


4:2: five version


Cheryl Serio version


Fred Leslie’s Missing Link – The Diplomettes version


Giuliano Palma & The Bluebeaters version


Melissa Langton – Mark Jones version


Rockapella version


Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass version


The Boss Guitars version


Johnny Hammond Smith version


Enoch Light – The Light Brigade version


Las Moskas version


Allan Lieberman version


Paul Ponnudorai version


Vw Boys version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-06-21, 11:47 PM
  #39  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Since I Don't Have You

"Since I Don't Have You" is a song written and composed by Jackie Taylor, James Beaumont, Janet Vogel, Joseph Rock, Joe Verscharen, Lennie Martin, and Wally Lester. It was first a 1958 hit single for the doo-wop group the Skyliners on the Billboard Hot 100. Country music singer Ronnie Milsap had a hit with the song in 1991. American hard rock band Guns N' Roses also had some success in 1994 with their version of the song which reached the top 10 on the UK Singles Chart.

Taken from their self-titled album and released in late 1958, the single reached number 12 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and number 7 on the Cash Box Top 100. It was also a top five hit on the 1959 R&B chart. It was highlighted by lead singer Jimmy Beaumont's powerful vocals, and the counterpoint between his tenor and Janet Vogel's soprano, on her final chorus, when Beaumont repeats the word "YOU" 12 times. The song is noted for its string and wind sections, performed by the Lenny Martin Orchestra.

The Skyliners version


proGrammar – Mary Mackenzie version


Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons version


Betty Everett – Jerry Butler version


Rick Nelson version


Lou Christie version


Eddie Holman version


Spiral Starecase version


B.J. Thomas version


Barbra Streisand version


Patti LaBelle version


Art Garfunkel version


New Edition version


Under The Streetlamp version


Jake Concepcion version


David Osborne version


Don McLean version


Johnny Mathis version


Ronnie McDowell version


Mariano Massolo · Kevin Johansen version


Sam Levine version


Round Midnight version

Ronnie Milsap version


Last edited by Garfield Cat; 07-06-21 at 11:56 PM.
Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-08-21, 10:29 PM
  #40  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Teen Angel

"Teen Angel" is a teenage tragedy song written by Jean Dinning (1924–2011) and her husband, Red Surrey, and performed by both Jean's brother, Mark Dinning, and Alex Murray in 1959. "Teen Angel" was released in October 1959. The song was not an instant success, with radio stations in the U.S. banning the song, considering it too sad. Despite the reluctance of radio stations, the song continued to climb the charts. In the last week of 1959, the single jumped from number 100 to number 50 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It went on to reach number 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 (February 1960) and number 37 in the UK Singles Chart (even though it was banned from being played by the BBC). Billboard ranked it as the number 5 song of 1960.

The song is about a girl and her boyfriend (the song's narrator) who go out for a ride together. He pulls her to safety when their car is stalled on a railroad track in the path of an oncoming train. But then she runs back to the car, and is killed in the collision. When her body is recovered, the narrator's high school class ring is in her hand, which was apparently the reason she ran back. The last verse ends with the lyrics: "I'll never kiss your lips again/They buried you today." The final line in the coda asks the Teen Angel to: "Answer me, please."

"Teen Angel" and its two predecessors at the Hot 100's top spot, "El Paso" by Marty Robbins and "Running Bear" by Johnny Preston, continued a string of pop tunes in which someone dies tragically.

Mark Dinning (Movie) version


Robbins & Paxton version


Wednesday version


Jimmy Ellis version


Dickey Lee version


Leroy Van **** version


Jimmy Velvet version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-09-21, 05:48 AM
  #41  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Crying In The Chapel

"Crying in the Chapel" is a song written by Artie Glenn for his son Darrell to sing. According to Cliff Glenn, Artie Glenn's oldest grandson, Artie had written the song in 1951 but left it in a drawer for two years, until Darrell recorded it while still in high school in 1953, along with Artie's band the Rhythm Riders. The song was rejected by Hill and Range Songs and Acuff-Rose Music. The song was eventually published by Valley Publishers which also released the single featuring, Darrell Glenn. It became a local hit and then it went nationwide. The original version of the song (Valley V-11) was issued in June 1953. Darrell Glenn's original recording reached number one on the Cash Box chart (where all versions were amalgamated) and number six on Billboard. Glenn's version also hit number six on the Billboard pop singles chart and number four on the Billboard country and western chart, Rex Allen's number eight, The Orioles' number 11, Ella Fitzgerald number 15, and Art Lund reached number 23. Lee Lawrence took his version to number 7 in the United Kingdom.

June Valli recorded the song with an orchestra directed by Joe Reisman in New York City on June 11, 1953. RCA Victor Records released it as a single in the U.S. (catalog umber 20-5368) and elsewhere by EMI on the His Master's Voice label (catalog number B. 10568). This was the most successful pop version on the Billboard charts, at that time, reaching number four after charting for 17 weeks beginning August 1, 1953.

On October 31, 1960, Elvis Presley cut a version of the song with plans to put it on his RCA gospel album His Hand in Mine. Three takes were recorded, but neither Elvis nor the Jordanaires, who provided background vocals, were satisfied. Eventually it was decided to shelve the recordings and move on.

On April 6, 1965, "Crying In the Chapel" was issued on RCA's "Gold Standard Series." It became Elvis' first million seller since "Return to Sender" in 1962 and his greatest chart success over a six-year span. The single hit number three on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and topped the Easy Listening chart for seven weeks. It was later included as a bonus track on Presley's 1967 gospel album, How Great Thou Art.

Presley's version also was a hit in the U.K., where it spent two non-consecutive weeks at number one.

Darrell Glenn version


The Persuasions – Jerry Lawson version


Elvis Presley version


June Valli version


Santo & Johnny version


Art Lund – Ray Charles Singers version


Ella Fitzgerald version


The Orioles version


Rex Allen version


Craig Duncan version


Sister Rosetta Tharpe version


Little Richard version


Beegie Adair version


The Platters version


Tammy Wynette version


The Staple Singers version


Regina Carter version


B.J. Thomas version


The Jordanaires version


Charlie Waller & The Country Gentlemen version


Mel Carter version


Johnny Hansen version


Eddy Arnold version


Los 5 Latinos version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-09-21, 11:13 PM
  #42  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: A Thousand Miles Away

"A Thousand Miles Away" is a 1956 song recorded by the American doo-wop group The Heartbeats. The song was written by James Sheppard and William H. Miller.

James “Shep” Sheppard was known for his silky voice, for being a songwriter who liked to write his songs while in the bathtub, and for not always being the easiest person to work with. The Heartbeats, from Queens, New York, consisted of Sheppard, Wally Roker, Albert Crump, Vernon Seavers, and Robby Tatuum. They signed with Hull Record in New York and recorded this song (co-written by Sheppard and William Miller) in 1956. After Hull sold the master to Rama Records, the song reached #5 on the R&B chart and #53 on the Pop Chart. They had a follow-on song titled “500 Miles to Go.”

The group disbanded in 1959. Sheppard formed Shep and The Limelites with new group members and had success with “Daddy’s Home,” which was an answer song to “A Thousand Miles Away.”

The Heartbeats version


The Diamonds version


Harry Nilsson version


Danny & The Juniors version


The Fleetwoods version


Santo & Johnny version


Little Anthony & The Imperials version


Street Corner Renaissance version


Boyz II Men – Take 6 version


Bobby Vinton version


New Edition version


The Temprees version


George Clinton & His Gangsters of Love version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-10-21, 11:35 PM
  #43  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Heart and Soul

"Heart and Soul" is a popular song composed by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics by Frank Loesser. It charted with different artists between 1938 and 1961. A simplified version is a popular piano duet.

In 1938, it was performed by Larry Clinton and his orchestra with vocals by Bea Wain. In 1939, three versions reached the music charts: Larry Clinton (No. 1), Eddy Duchin (No. 12), and Al Donahue (No. 16). A version by The Four Aces with the Jack Pleis Orchestra reached No. 11 in 1952, and a version by Johnny Maddox reached No. 57 in 1956. In 1961, The Cleftones version reached No. 18 and the one by Jan and Dean reached No. 25.

The Four Aces version


Larry Clinton Orchestra – Bea Wain version


The Cleftones (Movie American Graffiti) version


The Silk Road Ensemble – YoY o Ma – Lisa Fischer – Gregory Porter version


Kenny G version


Guy Stroman – Jason Graae – Stan Chandler – David Engel (Original Off Broadway cast) version


The Clayton – Hamilton Jazz Orchestra version


Jan and Dean version



Ella Fitzgerald version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-11-21, 07:30 AM
  #44  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Chantilly Lace

"Chantilly Lace" is the name of a rock and roll song written by Jiles Perry "The Big Bopper" Richardson, who released the song in August 1958. The single was produced by Jerry Kennedy.

The song was included in Robert Christgau's "Basic Record Library" of 1950s and 1960s recordings, published in Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981).

Originally cut for Pappy Daily's D label, the recording was purchased by Mercury Records and released in the summer of 1958, just over six months after Chuck Berry released "Sweet Little Sixteen," which uses the same chord progression. The song reached #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 and spent 22 weeks on the national Top 40. It was the third most played song of 1958. On the Cash Box chart, "Chantilly Lace" reached number four.

The song depicts a young man flirting with his girlfriend on the telephone and listing things about her that he likes, including:

Chantilly lace and a pretty face

And a pony tail hangin' down

A wiggle in her walk and a giggle in her talk

Make the world go 'round.

The song begins with the sound of a telephone ringing, and is answered by the Big Bopper shouting:

"HELLO BABY"

The "Hello Baby" motif reappears in the Big Bopper's follow-up song "Big Bopper's Wedding," in which the singer is so distracted by the bridesmaids that the impatient preacher demands, "Do you or don't you take this woman?"

Big Bopper version


Bruce Channel version


The Atlantics version


Eddy Mitchell version


Alf Robertson version


Jerry Lee Lewis version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-11-21, 12:23 PM
  #45  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Green Onions

"Green Onions" is an instrumental composition recorded in 1962 by Booker T. & the M.G.'s, Steve Crooker, Al Jackson, Jr., Booker T. Jones, & Lewis Steinberg. Described as "one of the most popular instrumental rock and soul songs ever" and as one of "the most popular R&B instrumentals of its era", the tune is a twelve-bar blues with a rippling Hammond M3 organ line by Booker T. Jones that he wrote when he was 17, although the actual recording was largely improvised in the studio.

The track was originally issued in May 1962 on the Volt label (a subsidiary of Stax Records) as the B-side of "Behave Yourself" on Volt 102; it was quickly reissued in August 1962 as the A-side of Stax 127, and it also appeared on the album Green Onions that same year. The organ sound of the song became a feature of the "Memphis soul sound".

According to Booker T. Jones, the composition was originally to be called "Funky Onions", but the sister of Jim Stewart thought it "sounded like a cuss word"; it was therefore renamed "Green Onions". According to Cropper, the title is not a marijuana reference; rather, the track is named after the Green Badger's cat, Green Onions, whose way of walking inspired the riff. Songfacts.com, however, ascribes the track's title to Jones. When asked by Stax co-owner Jim Stewart why he had given the track this title, Songfacts reports, Jones replied, "Because that is the nastiest thing I can think of and it's something you throw away." On a broadcast of the radio program Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! on June 24, 2013, Jones was asked about the title and said, "The bass player thought it was so funky, he wanted to call it 'Funky Onions', but they thought that was too low-class, so we used 'Green Onions' instead."

"Green Onions" was ranked No. 181 by Rolling Stone in its list of the 500 greatest songs of all time; it is the only instrumental in the list. The track is currently ranked as the 134th greatest track of all time, as well as the best track of 1962, by Acclaimed Music.

In 1999, "Green Onions" was given a Grammy Hall of Fame Award.

Booker T & Friends version


Geno Washington & The Yo Yo’s version


Bill McElhiney and his Orchestra version


Jimmy Takeuchi version


Mongo Santamaria version


Luna Lee version


Henry Mancini version


King Curtis version


Count Basie version


Blues Brothers (Movie) version


Black Mountain Blues Band & Spinning Wheel Horns version


Steven Bernstein & Gary Lucas · Roswell Rudd · Gary Lucas · Steven Bernstein version


Peter Valera version


Reel & Soul Association


Paul Hardcastle version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-11-21, 11:51 PM
  #46  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Only You (And You Alone)

"Only You (And You Alone)" (often shortened to "Only You") is a pop song composed by Buck Ram. It was originally recorded by The Platters with lead vocals by Tony Williams in 1955.

The Platters first recorded the song for Federal Records on May 20, 1954, but the recording was not released. In 1955, after moving to Mercury Records, the band re-recorded the song (on April 26) and it scored a major hit when it was released in May. In November that year, Federal Records released the original recording as a single (B-side - "You Made Me Cry") which sold poorly. Platter’s bass singer Herb Reed later recalled how the group hit upon its successful version: "We tried it so many times, and it was terrible. One time we were rehearsing in the car ... and the car jerked. Tony went 'O-oHHHH-nly you.' We laughed at first, but when he sang that song – that was the sign we had hit on something." According to Buck Ram, Tony Williams' voice "broke" in rehearsal, but they decided to keep this effect in the recording. This was the only Platters recording on which songwriter and manager Ram played the piano.

The Platters version


Brenda Lee version


Louis Armstrong version


Ray Conniff Singers version


The Lettermen version


Wayne Newton version


Roy Orbison version


Johnny Mathis version


Reba McEntire version


Jay-Ray & Gee version


Papa Bue's Viking Jazzband version


Diana Ross version


Javier Elorrieta · Suilma Aali version


Jazzy Judy Clark version


Alan Paul version


Jack Jezzro & Sam Levine version


Los Cinco Latinos version


Acker Bilk version


IIIrd Tyme Out version


Jay Black version


Timi Yuro version


Bobby Vinton version


The Stylistics version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-12-21, 11:09 PM
  #47  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: Goodnite, Sweetheart, Goodnite

"Goodnite, Sweetheart, Goodnite" is a popular song that was a hit during the mid-1950s. It was written by Calvin Carter and James "Pookie" Hudson in 1951, and was first recorded by The Spaniels in 1953. It has also been released by some artists as "Goodnight, Well It's Time to Go".

The Spaniels' version was ranked No. 20 on Billboard's ranking of "1954's Top R&B Records according to Retail Sales" and No. 15 on Billboard's ranking of "1954's Top R&B Records according to Juke Box Plays". It was also ranked No. 16 in Cash Box's ranking of "1954's Top R&B Records as Voted in the Cash Box Poll".

They have been called the first successful Midwestern R&B group. Some historians of vocal groups consider Pookie Hudson to be the first frontman of a vocal group because the Spaniels pioneered the technique of having the main singer solo at his microphone while the rest of the group shared a second microphone.

The original members included:
  • Thornton James "Pookie" Hudson (June 11, 1934 – January 16, 2007)
  • Ernest Warren (December 2, 1933 – May 7, 2012)
  • Willie C. Jackson (died February 18, 2015; aged 79)
  • Opal Courtney Jr. (November 22, 1936 – September 18, 2008)
  • Gerald Gregory (June 10, 1934 - February 12, 1999)
The Spaniels version


Chuck Berry version


The Overtones version


Jazzy Judy Clark version


The McGuire Sisters version


Anne Shelton version


Gloria Mann & The Carter Rays version


The Platters version


4:2: Five version


MC6 version


The Swing Kittens version


Blend version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-12-21, 11:38 PM
  #48  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The song: All Summer Long

"All Summer Long" is a song written by Brian Wilson and Mike Love for the American rock band the Beach Boys. It was released on their 1964 album All Summer Long, and as a single in the UK in February 1965.

According to AllMusic, "All Summer Long" contains beguiling teen fantasy lyrics; the narrative catalogs a series of happy events enjoyed by a guy and his girlfriend during the summer and punctuates them with the observation "every now and then we hear our song/we been having fun all summer long." The cheery sentiment of the lyrics carries over to the melody whose swirling bounciness provides a solid musical backdrop for the narrative's sunny tone, while its instrumental track is driven by boogie-woogie piano lines and some xylophone hooks."

The Beach Boys version


The Hit Co. The Tribute Co version


Ron Dante version

Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 07-16-21, 02:11 AM
  #49  
tharlandth
Junior Member
 
tharlandth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
It looks cool!
tharlandth is offline  
Old 07-20-21, 05:58 AM
  #50  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,966

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
The A Capella versions: Part 1

Boyz II Men – Take 6 version


New Edition version


8 To the Bar version


The Alley Cats version


MC6 A Capella version


4:2: Five version


What’s On Tap version


Tennessee & Pink Ladies version


Street Corner Renaissance version

Garfield Cat is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.