Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

New 700c rims to replace 27x 1 1/4 wheels?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

New 700c rims to replace 27x 1 1/4 wheels?

Old 10-01-21, 07:21 AM
  #1  
777funk
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
New 700c rims to replace 27x 1 1/4 wheels?

I have a new to me old Austrian Sears (I think Puch made) road bike that I find comfortable but don't care for the wheels. Could I get away with using 700c rims on this thing? There's some vertical adjustment that can be made on the brake pads.

It needs tires anyways (the ones on there are likely 30 years old) and the rims are too hard to true due to warping of the sides. May be a good time to upgrade. It's a $20 bike and I don't want to put a ton of cash into it (say under $100 done). I don't mind buying used as long as they're straight. Is this a doable venture (rims and tires for $80)?
777funk is offline  
Old 10-01-21, 07:27 AM
  #2  
ClydeClydeson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,255
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 438 Post(s)
Liked 644 Times in 377 Posts
Yes. If the brake pads can be adjusted 4mm down then 700C wheels will fit no problem. This will sometimes allow you to fit a tire of a couple mm wider as well.

Keep in mind that the further the pads move from the pivots on the brake calipers, the less braking force you will get from any given amount of hand force at the levers.
ClydeClydeson is offline  
Likes For ClydeClydeson:
Old 10-01-21, 08:22 AM
  #3  
777funk
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
Yes. If the brake pads can be adjusted 4mm down then 700C wheels will fit no problem. This will sometimes allow you to fit a tire of a couple mm wider as well.

Keep in mind that the further the pads move from the pivots on the brake calipers, the less braking force you will get from any given amount of hand force at the levers.
I didn't think of that with the braking force. Makes sense. I would think going from chromed steel to aluminum would help bring up the braking force a good bit. I notice all my aluminum wheel bikes stop a lot better than these old steel rims. The steel rims make brakes almost non existent if a little bit wet. I've learned to stay off this bike when there's any moisture on the ground.
777funk is offline  
Old 10-01-21, 08:58 AM
  #4  
Lazyass
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minas Ithil
Posts: 9,330
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2425 Post(s)
Liked 609 Times in 379 Posts
If the wheels are decent with aluminum rims I would just get some nice tires like Panaracer Pasela's. 27 inch wheels ride real smooth since they're a larger diameter. That's why the MTB's went to larger diameter wheels. I've always thought the industry should revive them with some modern 27 inchers with wide disc rims and fat tires for gravel bikes.
Lazyass is offline  
Old 10-01-21, 10:17 AM
  #5  
ClydeClydeson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,255
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 438 Post(s)
Liked 644 Times in 377 Posts
The change in braking force is noticeable, but not catastrophic. The brakes are designed to work with the pads at any position in the slot, so you're still in the acceptable range. And, yes, changing from chrome steel to aluminum rims will likely make it so that the sum of all changes will result in an improvement in braking, especially in the wet.
ClydeClydeson is offline  
Old 10-01-21, 10:27 AM
  #6  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,759

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3494 Post(s)
Liked 1,814 Times in 1,167 Posts
Originally Posted by Lazyass View Post
If the wheels are decent with aluminum rims I would just get some nice tires like Panaracer Pasela's. 27 inch wheels ride real smooth since they're a larger diameter. That's why the MTB's went to larger diameter wheels. I've always thought the industry should revive them with some modern 27 inchers with wide disc rims and fat tires for gravel bikes.
For that matter, maybe 700A or 700B deserve another look.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 10-01-21, 12:50 PM
  #7  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,374

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4186 Post(s)
Liked 2,709 Times in 1,888 Posts
Your bikes with alloy rims that you say you notice a difference in the braking force might also have double pivot brakes which are also a big improvement at the time for brake technology. And such brakes are typically inexpensive so if yours aren't and you still desire better braking, you might try some double pivot rim brakes available in most all brands and flavors.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 10-01-21, 02:32 PM
  #8  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 13,580

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2017 Workswell 093, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 143 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6588 Post(s)
Liked 1,751 Times in 953 Posts
The grippiness of aluminum compared to steel .... if you have ever depended on your brakes on your steel-rimmed bike, you know how little use they are compared to Al.
Maelochs is offline  
Old 10-01-21, 06:36 PM
  #9  
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Posts: 2,630

Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 159 Times in 123 Posts
I think you are dreaming with a budget of $80 for a pair of used 700c wheels including tires. I checked out our local CL which serves a population of nearly 2M. There were no wheels for sale at any price. You might do the same on Facebook marketplace but I doubt you will have any better luck. If there is a bike co-op nearby, contact them. Sometimes people donate bikes to them and they use them for parts. My local Goodwill only seem to have junk these days. Once in a while I see wheels in the bins at my local Goodwill surplus store but that is very hit and miss.
VegasTriker is offline  
Likes For VegasTriker:
Old 10-01-21, 08:28 PM
  #10  
777funk
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
I think you are dreaming with a budget of $80 for a pair of used 700c wheels including tires. I checked out our local CL which serves a population of nearly 2M. There were no wheels for sale at any price. You might do the same on Facebook marketplace but I doubt you will have any better luck. If there is a bike co-op nearby, contact them. Sometimes people donate bikes to them and they use them for parts. My local Goodwill only seem to have junk these days. Once in a while I see wheels in the bins at my local Goodwill surplus store but that is very hit and miss.
Probably so. I did look on ebay in sold listings and saw one set for $69 (tires and wheels). I also found tires for around $40-$50 a pair. Rims can be had with spokes for $60 to $100 on the cheap end. So I'm not way off, but I did think the same after I posted the original top post.

I'll probably just live with the minor annoyances of the factory rims. It's really not that bad. New tires and they'll be fine.
777funk is offline  
Old 10-03-21, 08:00 AM
  #11  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 23,421

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 135 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2919 Post(s)
Liked 1,866 Times in 1,132 Posts
Originally Posted by 777funk View Post
I didn't think of that with the braking force. Makes sense. I would think going from chromed steel to aluminum would help bring up the braking force a good bit. I notice all my aluminum wheel bikes stop a lot better than these old steel rims. The steel rims make brakes almost non existent if a little bit wet. I've learned to stay off this bike when there's any moisture on the ground.
Yes, going to an aluminum rim will definitely help with wet weather braking performance. You might also consider replacing the brake calipers with dual-pivot calipers to improve mechanical advantage. Tektro makes an inexpensive, long-reach, dual-pivot caliper I've used for such conversions.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Likes For JohnDThompson:
Old 10-03-21, 08:40 AM
  #12  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 30,220

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1567 Post(s)
Liked 623 Times in 352 Posts
Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
Yes. If the brake pads can be adjusted 4mm down then 700C wheels will fit no problem. This will sometimes allow you to fit a tire of a couple mm wider as well.

Keep in mind that the further the pads move from the pivots on the brake calipers, the less braking force you will get from any given amount of hand force at the levers.
The trick is that you have to adjust the brakes all the way down onto the rim brakeing surface. If the brake pads touch your tire, even a little bit, you are asking for a blow out.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Likes For Retro Grouch:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.