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My Shade Tree Practices

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My Shade Tree Practices

Old 06-23-22, 11:07 PM
  #1  
greatbasin
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My Shade Tree Practices

I did some work on a bike today.
I don't have a bike stand, so I just lay the bike on the lawn under the maple tree.

I took the wheels off, removed the QR skewers, and unwound the nuts on the axles. I greased these hubs about 10 years ago and I could still see some red Staplex in there. I wiped that out and cleaned the 7 balls from each side. I don't have Staplex anymore, so I pumped the bearing race full of green Lucas X-tra (polyurea-based) grease. This isn't what I'd use in my skate bearings, but it should last a long time.

The spokes had uneven tension and the rims were out of round. I used my kid's tablet and pulled up a guitar tuning app. I rotated the wheel to put each spoke in the same position and plucked it with a chopstick. The app read out the frequency of the vibration in Megahertz. I went around the wheels and found an average frequency for the front, rear dish, and rear non-dish side and used a spoke wrench to make them all the same. When I was finished, the rear was a bit out of round laterally. I did about a half-turn on the spoke to pull the rim in where it was out, and then the opposing spokes on the opposite side of the wheel. I trued two areas that were out of round this way and called it good.

I took the stem off and took the nut off the headset. I pulled the fork out. I found the head had caged bearings but they didn't appear to be lubricated. There's not a lot of movement there, but I put a light coat of green grease on the races and packed the cages with my fingers.

Whenever I'm putting bearings back together, I like them to be as loose as possible without having any play. I really try to avoid denting the bearing races.

The bottom bracket was next. I don't have a puller for the cranks, but I found some kind of puller for something in the back of my toolbox. It's a two-finger puller, so I could get the non-drive side crank off. I have a claw wrench. It's actually for the nut on the head of a Triumph motorcycle, but it works for the bottom bracket nut too. My puller won't work on the drive side, so I just loosened everything up and took a big syringe of green grease with a big needle on a Luer-lock and stuck it through the bottom bracket shell into the bearing on the opposite side and pumped it full of grease. I filled the near side with the syringe too. I reassembled the crank, again making sure the bearings spun freely before and after I tightened the jam nut.

Next, I moved onto the freewheel. This one is an Atom 77 Compact. I don't have that tool, just like I don't have the 24-spline Maillard tool I needed last month. A problem on this bike was the aluminum dork disc was ripped up and bent and there was some really tough weeds wrapped around between the hub and the freewheel. It was almost like jute twine, but I remember riding through some tall grass and that's what it actually was. I used a propane torch to burn through the twine-like fibers. Then I cut the dork disc out with a cold chisel. Since I couldn't open the freewheel, I poured some 75W140 gear oil in there while spinning it around. That quieted the pawls. I think next time I will try injecting it with CV joint grease which is a blend of gear oil and lithium grease designed not to leak as much as gear oil.

I adjusted the toe on the brake pads, lever positions, and tire pressure. I put a new chain on it a couple weeks ago. Cables are lined Jagwire so I don't lube them. I adjusted the stops on the derailleurs, especially to make sure the chain wouldn't go off the big sprocket without the spoke protector.

So am I an idiot? What did I do wrong? What would you rip me for or rag on me about if you saw me doing any of this stuff? The bike, by the way, was my '87 Schwinn Traveler.
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Old 06-23-22, 11:14 PM
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Old 06-23-22, 11:34 PM
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Nice looking bike.

As for your methods, if you have the hub cones, headset nut, BB nut tightened correctly then it sounds fine.

Issues can arise, with things coming loose, when the hub or BB cone isnít held in place with the jam the nut or ring tightened against it; same with the headset, if not keyed.

If in your makeshift approach you did this, then good job.

John
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Old 06-24-22, 06:04 AM
  #4  
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An additional thing--keep the the aluminum seat post and handlebar stem greased so they don't seize against the steel.

My brother has that bike and I borrowed it from him during a visit, after it had been neglected for over twenty years. I did a similar service on it in his garage, with no stand or bike tools and got it working again. It's a real old workhorse, hard to abuse too much. His had a one piece crank though, so a few years older I bet, a little heavier, and easier to service with an adjustable wrench and screwdriver.
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Old 06-24-22, 06:12 AM
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Originally Posted by greatbasin View Post
I did some work on a bike today.
I don't have a bike stand, so I just lay the bike on the lawn under the maple tree.

I took the wheels off, removed the QR skewers, and unwound the nuts on the axles. I greased these hubs about 10 years ago and I could still see some red Staplex in there. I wiped that out and cleaned the 7 balls from each side. I don't have Staplex anymore, so I pumped the bearing race full of green Lucas X-tra (polyurea-based) grease. This isn't what I'd use in my skate bearings, but it should last a long time.

The spokes had uneven tension and the rims were out of round. I used my kid's tablet and pulled up a guitar tuning app. I rotated the wheel to put each spoke in the same position and plucked it with a chopstick. The app read out the frequency of the vibration in Megahertz. I went around the wheels and found an average frequency for the front, rear dish, and rear non-dish side and used a spoke wrench to make them all the same. When I was finished, the rear was a bit out of round laterally. I did about a half-turn on the spoke to pull the rim in where it was out, and then the opposing spokes on the opposite side of the wheel. I trued two areas that were out of round this way and called it good.

I took the stem off and took the nut off the headset. I pulled the fork out. I found the head had caged bearings but they didn't appear to be lubricated. There's not a lot of movement there, but I put a light coat of green grease on the races and packed the cages with my fingers.

Whenever I'm putting bearings back together, I like them to be as loose as possible without having any play. I really try to avoid denting the bearing races.

The bottom bracket was next. I don't have a puller for the cranks, but I found some kind of puller for something in the back of my toolbox. It's a two-finger puller, so I could get the non-drive side crank off. I have a claw wrench. It's actually for the nut on the head of a Triumph motorcycle, but it works for the bottom bracket nut too. My puller won't work on the drive side, so I just loosened everything up and took a big syringe of green grease with a big needle on a Luer-lock and stuck it through the bottom bracket shell into the bearing on the opposite side and pumped it full of grease. I filled the near side with the syringe too. I reassembled the crank, again making sure the bearings spun freely before and after I tightened the jam nut.

Next, I moved onto the freewheel. This one is an Atom 77 Compact. I don't have that tool, just like I don't have the 24-spline Maillard tool I needed last month. A problem on this bike was the aluminum dork disc was ripped up and bent and there was some really tough weeds wrapped around between the hub and the freewheel. It was almost like jute twine, but I remember riding through some tall grass and that's what it actually was. I used a propane torch to burn through the twine-like fibers. Then I cut the dork disc out with a cold chisel. Since I couldn't open the freewheel, I poured some 75W140 gear oil in there while spinning it around. That quieted the pawls. I think next time I will try injecting it with CV joint grease which is a blend of gear oil and lithium grease designed not to leak as much as gear oil.

I adjusted the toe on the brake pads, lever positions, and tire pressure. I put a new chain on it a couple weeks ago. Cables are lined Jagwire so I don't lube them. I adjusted the stops on the derailleurs, especially to make sure the chain wouldn't go off the big sprocket without the spoke protector.

So am I an idiot? What did I do wrong? What would you rip me for or rag on me about if you saw me doing any of this stuff? The bike, by the way, was my '87 Schwinn Traveler.
sounds like my typical bike overhaul before I got fancy with a repair stand and proper tools. It got the job done. BTWI doubt if your guitar tuning app was reading megahertz (millions of hertz) - thatís radio frequency. Guitar strings ring in the 100ís of hertz range
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Old 06-24-22, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Litespud View Post
BTWI doubt if your guitar tuning app was reading megahertz (millions of hertz) - thatís radio frequency. Guitar strings ring in the 100ís of hertz range
100hz is 0.0001 megahertz...
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Old 06-24-22, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Litespud View Post
......BTWI doubt if your guitar tuning app was reading megahertz (millions of hertz) - thatís radio frequency. Guitar strings ring in the 100ís of hertz range
Maybe they work for the news media?
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Old 06-24-22, 02:35 PM
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Using the guitar tuning app. is genius!
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Old 06-24-22, 05:21 PM
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Gear oil is a bit thick for freewheel pawls, especially if you live in or ride in cold weather. I personally flush with mineral spirits and break cleaner then lube with 10/30 synthetic motor oil
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