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Vintage to Modern what to upgrade first

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Vintage to Modern what to upgrade first

Old 12-31-21, 02:12 PM
  #1  
BrianSal05
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Vintage to Modern what to upgrade first

Hi, I bought a Shogun Selectra a 2 months ago for around a $100 dlls, which is a good price for a working vintage in my area. I been using it to commute and I have began participating on group rides in my area, where i have noticed the age of the components and the quality began to show, I am having to go to the bike shop every other week to get my cranks tighten, true the wheels, and such. I really like the look of the bike, so I was thinking on modernizing it rather than buying a new one specialy 'cause it hurts me with the pandemic inflated prices. Pretty much everything is stock except the wheels that were 'upgraded' by the previous owner to a cheapo, 35mm deep 700c wheelset, and bought a saddle since the guy solded to me without one. Size 54cm current weight about 11.5kg (25lb).

Wanted to keep my budget under $600 but looking around the internet i don't think i'm going to find a groupset for around that price so might over a little bit.
What should I upgrade first rn I have $200 dlls saved up here are my options: (btw forgot to mention but tires also need to be changed)
  • looking around the internet I found a good deal in some fulcrum 900 wheelset for $180 which would make my current budget go all towards that, and leaves me without tyres which is no biggie since i still have a couple miles on the current ones and I would have to run single speed for a while too since i don't have cassettes.
  • or I could buy a new FSA Gossamer crankset, bottom bearing and tyres that I found for around 170 dlls.
  • I also found a sweet deal on some 105 shifters but since i wouldn't be able to use them right away i'm letting pass probably, 140 dlls. + tyres prob.
  • OR recommendations from you guys.
Also would like your opinion on the wheels, i think frankly that its a good deal but in other forums people where saying that they where a mushy mess and such, honestly way better than what i have rn and in my budget but appreciate any recommendations you guys give me.
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Old 12-31-21, 02:23 PM
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Safety first. I suggest getting better brakes and brake pads. Shimano or Tektro brakes with Koolstop pads should serve you well.
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Old 12-31-21, 02:40 PM
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You should learn how to do some of the work yourself. IF YOU ARE TAKING IT TO THE LOCAL BIKE SHOP EVERY FOURTEEN DAYS TO GET YOUR CRANKS TIGHTENED AND YOUR WHEELS TRUED, DO NOT GO BACK TO THAT SHOP EVER AGAIN. Your Shogun is a pretty nice bike.
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Old 12-31-21, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by philpeugeot View Post
Safety first. I suggest getting better brakes and brake pads. Shimano or Tektro brakes with Koolstop pads should serve you well.
I will take it into account, before this bike i was riding an old walmart mtb that braked surprisingly well, I thought that it had more to do with the fact that V brakes are just that more powerful, but maybe the pads haven't been change in a while, though a mechanic has never pointed it out.
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Old 12-31-21, 02:57 PM
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Check out this thread:
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ure-heavy.html
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Old 12-31-21, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by philpeugeot View Post
Safety first. I suggest getting better brakes and brake pads. Shimano or Tektro brakes with Koolstop pads should serve you well.
Why? I can understand upgrading the pads but why the whole caliper? I suspect people have cycled enough miles to reach the end of the universe and a back with all manner of brakes before DPs came along and it isn't like high percentage of them have been killed because the brakes failed.
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Old 12-31-21, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by BrianSal05 View Post
I will take it into account, before this bike i was riding an old walmart mtb that braked surprisingly well, I thought that it had more to do with the fact that V brakes are just that more powerful, but maybe the pads haven't been change in a while, though a mechanic has never pointed it out.
Yes properly adjusted V brakes are better stoppers but millions of people ride millions of miles a day with lower quality brakes than yours and live to tell about. A good cleaning of the rims with alcohol or nail polish remover along with quality new pads should greatly improve your brakes.

Try and these Kool Stops



I agree with Classtime you need to find a different shop
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Old 12-31-21, 04:09 PM
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If I am finding the correct bike, that model is basically light action SIS 6 speed, low level alloy Shimano or Sugino crank, and Z series brakes.

The best upgrades are going to come cheaply, then little by little you can change the rest if you get attached to it.

i am thinking this would be a cool everything bike...road, gravel, etc...

Brake pads, tires, cables, bar tape, comfy saddle and maybe chain. Then ride it.

Any modernizing is going to be pretty much domino effect. And the OP should probably get a vision of what it might look like.
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Old 12-31-21, 05:36 PM
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Don't forget to upgrade cables and cable housings, particularly for the brakes.
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Old 12-31-21, 09:42 PM
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What should I upgrade first rn I have $200 dlls saved up here are my options: (btw forgot to mention but tires also need to be changed)
  • looking around the internet I found a good deal in some fulcrum 900 wheelset for $180 which would make my current budget go all towards that, and leaves me without tyres which is no biggie since i still have a couple miles on the current ones and I would have to run single speed for a while too since i don't have cassettes.
  • or I could buy a new FSA Gossamer crankset, bottom bearing and tyres that I found for around 170 dlls.
  • I also found a sweet deal on some 105 shifters but since i wouldn't be able to use them right away i'm letting pass probably, 140 dlls. + tyres prob.
  • OR recommendations from you guys.
Also would like your opinion on the wheels, i think frankly that its a good deal but in other forums people where saying that they where a mushy mess and such, honestly way better than what i have rn and in my budget but appreciate any recommendations you guys give me.
...if you want to keep and ride this bike, put your money into decent wheels and tyres. All of the components I saw on the bike in the other referenced thread seem to be pretty serviceable, and if anything, an FSA Gossamer crankset is not an upgrade on the original. If you are taking that original crank in to have it retightened every two weeks it might be damaged. Sometimes the crank arm spindle sockets get damaged by someone riding them loose on the spindle, and the spindle gouges the flats. A crank once damaged like that will never stay tight.

Youi need someone knowledgeable who is ethical and on your side to evaluate the mechanical condition of everything on a used bike of this age, that you bought for 100 bucks. I would advise against buying anything for it unless/until you find that person and get some in person advice. No one on the internet can actually see what's going on with your bike, and you have no idea of the mechanical service history of it.

I can only say I have ridden similar bikes thousands of miles, and never "upgraded" anything, except maybe the tyres, and retensioning the spokes.
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Old 01-01-22, 12:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
Why? I can understand upgrading the pads but why the whole caliper? I suspect people have cycled enough miles to reach the end of the universe and a back with all manner of brakes before DPs came along and it isn't like high percentage of them have been killed because the brakes failed.
Fair enough, pads should do the trick. I just thought the OP might want to upgrade as much as possible. Also, more modern dual-pivot brakes might fit in visually with the newer wheelset.
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Old 01-01-22, 01:18 AM
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Originally Posted by BrianSal05 View Post
i have noticed the age of the components and the quality began to show, I am having to go to the bike shop every other week to get my cranks tighten, true the wheels, and such.
Needing constant re-adjustment of cranks and wheels isn't a sign of age, it's a sign that the parts are damaged and/or the mechanic doesn't know what they're doing.
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Old 01-01-22, 01:32 AM
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Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Needing constant re-adjustment of cranks and wheels isn't a sign of age, it's a sign that the parts are damaged and/or the mechanic doesn't know what they're doing.
Edit: thread crossover. Oops.

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Old 01-01-22, 03:03 AM
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@BrianSal05 if you can get to 10 posts, then you can post photos of your ride and that can help us help you a bit more/more easily. There is a Selectra at my local shop-grey with some cross-hatch graphics. Good looking bike.

To keep things cheap, it is good to learn and know how to do basic maintenance. Of course, needing the tools to do so costs money, so it's a bit of give and take as you save and spend for your bike--the upside being you keep your tool for later work on the bike--no spending money at a bike mechanic. Otherwise, you're at the mercy of either an incompetent mechanic or crummy components. How handy or skilled with tools are you (this is just a curious question)? Would you be willing to learn?

What is your local online marketplace like? Any good, or is online from a retailer or eBay better for you? As far as cheap groupsets, there are many used Shimano groupsets around. If looking for current or new, Shimano's R2000 generation of Claris (2x8 or 3x8 speed) is an excellent value. Beautiful components that have proven internals. Comfortable and capable. I have them on one of my bikes and I really like it. Shimano Sora as well. R3000 is the current generation, but there are previous ones that work just fine and no one cares about (meaning they are cheap to buy). I've never had issue with older 9-speed Sora shifters (3400 generation, IIRC), and they'll work with older Shimano SIS (indexing) derailleurs.

If you could prioritize what part of the bike needs the most help, that will help you and all of us sort your Shogun out. Mushy feeling brakes, weak brakes, hard to pull the levers, shifting is off, chain skips, tires are bald, wheels are loose or wobbly, chain squeaks, something is loose or clunks as you ride along, etc. Some things are safety-related, and those are generally good things to address first. Hope this helps.
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Old 01-01-22, 05:06 AM
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc View Post
Cotter pin issue?
I don't think this bike had cotter pins.


Everyone..... I wonder if the OP is saying cranks tightened but it is actually the BB coming loose?
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Old 01-01-22, 05:52 AM
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Cables , brake pads, tires, and bar tape.

Then start planning and saving
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Old 01-01-22, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
I don't think this bike had cotter pins.


Everyone..... I wonder if the OP is saying cranks tightened but it is actually the BB coming loose?
It could be a case of the crankarms coming loose. When a cotterless crankarm is insufficiently tightened and ridden loose, the steel spindle damages the tapered hole in the softer, aluminum crankarm. The damage can reach a point where loose crankarms become a chronic issue.

The most common damage is that the end of the spindle
creates a burr in the hole. This is visible and often (about 80% of the time) careful filing of the burr will resolve the problem. The problem is most common with the softer/less dense, melt forged cranksets. I saw it a lot on recently purchased department store bicycles.

However, the hole can also be distorted and this is usually visible to the naked eye only in extreme cases. Distorted holes are rarely repairable, except by a machine shop, and even then refinishing of the hole often results in the removal of enough material to cause the spindle
end to protrude beyond the bolt seat.

Regardless, I agree with member Classtime, the first thing that the OP needs to upgrade is his bicycle shop.

Last edited by T-Mar; 01-01-22 at 07:32 AM.
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Old 01-01-22, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
I don't think this bike had cotter pins.
Oops. Thread crossover disorder. Thought that post was in Atala thread.


Everyone..... I wonder if the OP is saying cranks tightened but it is actually the BB coming loose?
m

That seems likely unless the tapers are completely buggered.
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Old 01-01-22, 11:36 AM
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If you need a shop to do any and all work, buy a lightly used modern bike instead.
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Old 01-01-22, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
It could be a case of the crankarms coming loose. When a cotterless crankarm is insufficiently tightened and ridden loose, the steel spindle damages the tapered hole in the softer, aluminum crankarm. The damage can reach a point where loose crankarms become a chronic issue.

The most common damage is that the end of the spindle
creates a burr in the hole. This is visible and often (about 80% of the time) careful filing of the burr will resolve the problem. The problem is most common with the softer/less dense, melt forged cranksets. I saw it a lot on recently purchased department store bicycles.

However, the hole can also be distorted and this is usually visible to the naked eye only in extreme cases. Distorted holes are rarely repairable, except by a machine shop, and even then refinishing of the hole often results in the removal of enough material to cause the spindle
end to protrude beyond the bolt seat.

Regardless, I agree with member Classtime, the first thing that the OP needs to upgrade is his bicycle shop.
UH Yeah I know
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Old 01-01-22, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post
You should learn how to do some of the work yourself. IF YOU ARE TAKING IT TO THE LOCAL BIKE SHOP EVERY FOURTEEN DAYS TO GET YOUR CRANKS TIGHTENED AND YOUR WHEELS TRUED, DO NOT GO BACK TO THAT SHOP EVER AGAIN. Your Shogun is a pretty nice bike.
if the cranks are loosening then -
the tapers are / were damaged in the past.
there is a mismatch and the spindle is at or beyond the base of the crank arm bore.
the tapers were greased prior to assembly-
( an ever so slight amount of grease, like clear the taper bore of the arm and wipe off what you can with clean fingers - then assemble)
not sure of the type bolts or nuts, 40-45 nm was typical for bolts.

that all typed, with a $600 budget, I would look for a better whole bike. Say in the $500 range leaving you some $ for consumables or parts you might need.
then you might sell off the first bike, transferring the saddle you like best.
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Old 01-02-22, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by BrianSal05 View Post
I will take it into account, before this bike i was riding an old walmart mtb that braked surprisingly well, I thought that it had more to do with the fact that V brakes are just that more powerful, but maybe the pads haven't been change in a while, though a mechanic has never pointed it out.
V-brakes are perceived as more powerful because they are simply more "grabby", meaning they don't provide the same modulation or control as caliper or cantilevers. Properly set up and with good brake pads, any decent set of brakes are powerful enough to lock up your wheels and send you over the handlebars. Pads and setup are everything.
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Old 01-02-22, 07:46 AM
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You don't need new wheels just because the current ones keep going out of true. You need to find a good wheelbuilder that knows how to properly true and tension a wheel. What you're describing is THE classic symptom of uneven spoke tension. You're at risk of breaking spokes also, until you have that addressed by someone that knows what they're doing. You might find that your current bike shop doesn't even own a tensiometer, or have someone that knows how to use one. Ask them.

That said, wheels can definitely make a difference in the way a bike handles and performs so if the current ones are heavy or limit your tire choices, that's a valid reason to upgrade. But don't buy a new set of wheels because your current bike shop doesn't know what they're doing. The same is true for the rest of it. You don't need a new crankset just because your current bike shop can't properly diagnose why it keeps loosening. Maybe you just need a new bottom bracket.

If cost is no object that's one thing, but it sounds like you have a budget. I'd tend to focus on just getting it working in its current form, and just ride it. Then see what kinds of "upgrades" or modernization really make sense. That's a pretty decent bike and you might find that you like it better than you think you will. If you take it to a decent bike shop and have them do a complete overhaul, that should easily come in under $200 and might be the best way to spend money on that bike, for now.
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Old 01-03-22, 01:08 AM
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Tires. The performance bang for your buck is biggest here.

Don't know why anyone would suggest swapping out brakes when the OP didn't mention anything about poor braking. I had no idea what a Shogun Selectra was until I clicked on the link from a previous thread. Looks like it's a good mmid-range road bike from that era.

Next I'd buy some tools and learn how to use them.
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Old 01-03-22, 02:43 AM
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Hi, everyone. Just wanted to let you know we blasted the OP out of orbit with all our responses and am suggesting we wait until he responds (if at all) before we throw a million more things at him or repeat what others have said.

And since I am enjoying the complete lack of relevant photos, here are some Selectras for your viewing pleasure:

This is the same color scheme as the one at Bike Works. If you want to see it in person and wear glasses, it will be in focus...


I did not know these came in a freaking sweet pink color. I wish Shogun was not so stridently stingy with this model that they refused a second pair of bottle cage bosses throughout its years (however many there were).
RiddleOfSteel is offline  

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